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THE $250,000 FUND 

THE SIXTH ST. MARY'S CONFERENCE 

HONORS TO ST. MARY'S GIRLS 

NEWS OF THE ALUMNAE AND THE FACULTY 



Vacation dumber 

&USU*t, 1016 

2nf Mary's School Libmy 



a 

3^7&,3 

Location Central for the Carolinas. 7/ j 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 



St. Marts School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

75th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBEK 15, 1916. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 22, 1917. 



1. THE COLLEGE 

2. THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
St. Mary's \ ^ TRE ART DEPARTMENT 

offers 
instruction ib THE ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 

in these j St THE SOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 
Departments / 

6. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL 

7. THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



In 1915-16 were enrolled 275 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 
Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 
Dormitories. 
Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 
slight to the Scholastic training. 
For catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, D. C. L., 

Rector. 

EDWARDS ft BROUGHTON PRINTING CO.. RALEIGH, N C 



The St. Mary's Muse 

VACATION NUMBER 

JVol. XXI August, 1916 Eo. 1 

The $250,000 Fund 



In the week following Commencement, at a meeting of the Cam- 
paign Committee, the President of the Board of Trustees and the 
Hector of St. Mary's, the Kev. Francis M. Osborne, of Charlotte, 
definitely accepted the offer of the Trustees to undertake the raising 
P the $250,000 Fund. While an official announcement to that effect 
las not yet been made, it is understood that $50,000 of this Fund is to 
|oe devoted to paying off the debt, $100,000 to putting the plant in 
i:he best possible condition and providing additional buildings and 
equipment; and $100,000 to beginning a permanent endowment fund 
|!or the School. 

It must be manifest to all friends of the School, and especially to 
hhe Alumnse who are most deeply concerned, that this is the most 
important step that has been taken in connection with St. Mary's 
idnce the School became the property of the Church nineteen years 
ago. 

The Rev. Mr. Osborne is not yet quite ready to announce the gen- 
eral plan of the campaign, which will be worked out by him in con- 
junction with the Campaign Committee of the Trustees, which con- 
sists of Rev. Isaac W. Hughes, of Henderson, Mr. Graham H. 
Andrews, of Raleigh, and Mr. George C. Roy all, of Goldsboro, 
rending further announcements all those interested would like to 
mow about Mr. Osborne and the work. 

The News and Observe?' of June 1 said: 

Mr. Osborne, who is the son of the Ven. Edwin A. Osborne, former arch- 
leacon of Charlotte, is a young man of striking personal appearance, and fine, 
iorceful character. 

! Two missions, at that time in the suburbs of Charlotte, placed in his charge 
seventeen years ago, by the Bishop of the Diocese, are now two strong, inde- 

14148 



The St. Mary's Muse 



pendent parishes — St. Martin's and the Church of the Holy Comforter — each 
with its own church and rector. 

Although time and again called to fields of what seemed more attractive 
service, and offering much greater material remuneration, with high loyalty 
and unswerving steadfastness, Mr. Osborne chose to devote both talents and 
energies to building up these missions until he had placed each upon a 
strong and independent foundation. 

The Holy Comforter, of which he is now rector, has a beautiful stone 
church, the Atkinson Memorial, made possible largely by Mr. Osborne's per- 
sonal activities. At the very inception of the project to raise two hundred 
and fifty thousand dollars for St. Mary's the Rev. Mr. Osborne was the choice 
of the trustees for the undertaking. 

Not only did the conventions of the Dioceses of North Carolina and East 
Carolina unanimously approve of the original action of the trustees, and 
pledge themselves to cooperation, but the Trustees at their subsequent annual 
meeting, reaffirmed their former determination, sustaining it by substantial 
money backing. 

At a recent gathering, in the Parish house of Christ Church, Raleigh, of the 
members of the vestries of that church and the Church of the Good Shepherd, 
with other loyal friends of St. Mary's, both men and women, a fine spirit of 
devoted interest was manifested; crystallizing in an enthusiastic resolution of 
active cooperation in time and money, to secure for St. Mary's the full 
amount proposed; that the School may not only have financial security, but 
may be placed where it may develop, untrammeled, and with the utmost 
efficiency, its exceptionally high potentiality. 

All friends not only of St. Mary's, but of the State, and that high type of 
Christian education for which St. Mary's stands, must rejoice at what has 
been done — the strong, virile movement, the choice and securing of a fit man 
to carry it on. 

They must not only look forward with assurance, but generously give con- 
tinuous and full support that there may be effected the desired resultant of 
two such happy forces. 

On Whit Sunday Mr. Osborne tendered his resignation as Rector 
of the Church of the Holy Comforter (the Bishop Atkinson Memorial) 
and asked that his resignation he accepted to become effective Sep- 
tember 15 th. 

In September Mr. Osborne will have completed twelve years of his 
ministry at work in Charlotte. During this time he has had the 
satisfaction of seeing the congregations of St. Martin's and the Holy 
Comforter grow from small missions to self-supporting and influential 
parishes, worshiping in a new and well appointed church. During 
the summer he hopes to complete the work of organization of St. 
Andrew's Chapel, up to this time an unorganized mission. Outside 



The St. Mary's Muse 



of his regular pastoral duties, Mr. Osborne has given much of his 
time to matters of local civic interest, being one of the organizers in 
Charlotte of the Associated Charities, the Boy Scout organization, 
and the Playground Movement. As editor and business manager of 
The Carolina Churchman, treasurer of St. Michael's School, trustee 
of the University of the South, and member of committees in the 
Convocation of Charlotte and the Diocese of North Carolina, he has 
borne his share of the Church's work of other than local character. 

In the July number of The Carolina Churchman, of which Mr. 
Osborne for a number of years has been editor, this announcement 
of his new work is published : 

A $250,000 Fund for St. Mary's School 

Rev. Francis M. Osborne to Organize and Lead a Movement 
to Secure This Amount. 

In response to a call of the Trustees of St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
Rev. Francis M. Osborne, on Whit Sunday, tendered his resignation 
as rector of the Church of the Holy Comforter (the Bishop Atkinson 
Memorial), Charlotte, and after the middle of September will devote 
his entire time and energies to organizing and leading the movement 
to secure a fund of "two hundred and fifty thousand dollars for the 
school. 

The campaign to be carried on by Mr. Osborne has been launched 
by the Board of Trustees under the wise direction of an efficient 
committee consisting of Mr. Graham H. Andrews, a prominent banker 
of Raleigh, Rev. Isaac W. Hughes, the popular and influential rector 
of the Church of the Holy Innocents, Henderson, 1ST. C, and Mr. 
G. C. Royall, a well known churchman and business man of Goldsboro. 
These will cooperate with Mr. Osborne in appointing other committees 
who will help in carrying the plan through to a successful conclusion. 

For several years the Trustees of St. Mary's School have been plan- 
ning this move, and have been on the lookout for a man and a pro- 
pitious time to inaugurate the undertaking. The time has now come 
that necessity makes the matter more urgent, and it remains to be 
seen how enthusiastically the alumnae and constituency of St. Mary's 
School will rally to the support of the leader. The Trustees of the 



The St. Mary's Muse 



School have already entered heartily into the movement, not only by 
their votes, but also by their subscriptions; and a meeting of men 
and women of Raleigh has been held and the determination expressed 
that the people of Raleigh will begin the campaign there, and set the 
pace for other North Carolina cities. North Carolina and South 
Carolina will first do their part loyally by this institution, and then 
the movement will extend to every place in the country where the 
alumna? and friends of the School cherish and value the influence of 
this noble institution, now in the seventy-fifth year of her work for 
Christian womanhood and the Church. 

The Need for the Fund. 

It is not hard for any one familiar with the requirements of institu- 
tions of higher learning to realize the vital necessity for a liberal 
financial support of St. Mary's. In the first place, the School must 
be relieved of the burden of the debt assumed several years ago for 
much-needed buildings and equipment. During the nineteen years 
the School has been the property of the Church, besides meeting obli- 
gations created by scholarships, eighty thousand dollars has been paid 
out of the current income of the School for buildings, equipment, 
improvements, interest, and other expenses, which should not have 
been paid out of the school income. Thus the full development of 
the School has to a certain extent been hampered, and though fine 
improvements have been made, the progress has been only through 
great anxiety and hard economy. 

Now further enlargement and improvement is imperative. Every 
live institution must be a progressive institution, or it ceases to live 
its full life. The constantly increasing cost of material, and the 
demand of the best teachers for better salaries, means one of two 
things : the School must have an endowment, or increase its fees. 
Retrenchment is not to be thought of. An increase of fifty per cent 
in fees would probably result very soon in just as large a School, but 
the School would not be carrying out its settled policy of giving a 
good educational preparation at moderate cost. The School can only 
serve the Church properly by giving the highest type of education at 
a cost equal to the average ability of the section of the country which 



The St. Mary's Muse 



it serves. In no high-class institution of learning, except a few select 
and expensive schools, is it to be expected that fees of the pupils pay 
the full cost of teaching, and interest on buildings and property 
invested. So endowment and funds for new buildings and equipment 
are a part of the present as well as the future liabilities of St. Mary's 
School. 

The Time is Ripe. 
The time for raising the St. Mary's Fund is now fully ripe. The 
Episcopal Church is aroused to her responsibility in the matter of 
education, and this conviction is growing stronger every day. An 
evidence of this may be seen in the prompt response which raised 
three hundred thousand dollars in three months to pay Sewanee's 
indebtedness. Proportionately, our Episcopalians have more money 
than any other body of Christians in this part of the country. The 
country is financially prosperous, and our people have acquired great 
wealth, and are fast growing richer. The South is no longer poor. 
Our Southern Churchmen have not yet given largely, but no doubt the 
time has now come when it will be considered the right thing for 
Southern men to give to Southern institutions of learning as gener- 
ously as Northern men have given to like institutions in the jSTorth. 
It is confidently expected that all will at once rally to the call of 
St. Mary's, and this School, loved by men and women alike, shall be 
second to none in her standards, opportunities, and ideals. The 
Church is not demanding that St. Mary's be a cheap school, but that 
St. Mary's be the best school, and within reach of all. 



An Introduction to the New Teachers 



There are few changes among the faculty and officers for the coming 
year. The academic faculty does not lose a member; Miss Abbott 
and Miss Shull retire from the music faculty, and in their places we 
shall have Mr. Hagedorn and Miss Thompson ; Miss Metcalf gives up 
the Household Arts Department and is succeeded by Miss Trow- 
bridge; Mrs. Bottum leaves the Infirmary and her successor is Miss 
Alexander. 



6 The St. Mary's Muse 



Mr. Gustav Hagedom, who will have charge of the Violin for the 
coming session, is widely known. He was for a number of years 
Professor of Violin and Orchestral Instruments at Meredith College, 
and Dean of the Meredith College School of Music from 1912-1915. 
He has been Director of Music at the University of North Carolina 
Summer School since 1912, and was President of the North Carolina 
Music Teachers' Association in 1913-14. He was also Director of 
the Chorus and Conductor at the recent North Carolina Music Fes- 
tival in Raleigh. Mr. Hagedorn is a pupil of Adolf Hahn and 
Leopold Lichtenberg, and later studied with Issay Barmas and Edgar 
Stillman Kelly in Berlin. Before coming to Raleigh in 1906 he was 
for five years a member of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. 
Mr. Hagedorn's home is in Cameron Park just west of the St. Mary's 
grounds. 

Miss Marian Thompson, who succeeds Miss Shull, studied in the 
H. Thane Miller School in Cincinnati and in the Institute of Musical 
Art of the State of New York. She completed the Supervisor's 
Course there in June, 1915, and the Singing Course in June, 1916. 
She is a pupil of Mr. Arthur Leroy Tebbs, of Dayton, Ohio, and of 
Sergei Klibansky and Mrs. Theodore J. Toedt in New York. Her 
home is at 716 W. State Street, Trenton, N. J. 

Miss Mildred Trowbridge, who assumes charge of the Home Eco- 
nomics Department, is a graduate of the Thomas Normal Training 
School in Detroit, Michigan. She received her high school education 
in the Manual Training High School in Kansas City, and in the 
McKinley High School in St. Louis, of which she is a graduate. She 
is very highly recommended by the authorities of the Thomas Train- 
ing School, and seems to be well adapted to the St. Mary's work. 
Her home is in St. Joseph's, Missouri. 

Miss Annie Dupree Alexander, who will have charge of the In- 
firmary is a graduate nurse. She graduated from St. Vincent's 
Hospital in Norfolk, and since that date has been practicing her 
profession. She is the daughter of Mrs. J. H. Alexander, of Chase 
City, Virginia, who was a St. Mary's girl, and is a first cousin of 
Miss Rebe Shields. 

The Muse, in behalf of all the members of the School, bids these 
incoming teachers a hearty welcome to St. Mary's. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



With the Rector 



The Rector was busy with the Conference for the fortnight after 
the close of school, and then turned his attention to filling the vacan- 
cies on the Faculty. He left for the North on June 19th, and after 
visiting New York, Boston and Detroit and spending Sunday in Erie, 
Pennsylvania, where he once was Rector of the Parish, he reached 
St. Paul's School the last of June. During the month of July he 
will have charge of the summer church at Rye, N. H., spending, 
however, a large part of each week with his brother's family at St. 
Paul's School. 

Nancy went north with Miss Davis to spend the early summer with 
her uncle, Mr. Beirne Lay, at St. Paul's, and expects to return to 
Raleigh with her father. Elizabeth took the college entrance examin- 
ations in Norfolk the third week in June and visited her relatives 
there for several weeks afterwards. Ellen went in July to Franconia, 
N. H., to spend a month with friends there. 

George Balch Lay, who was at home from Chapel Hill the first of 
the summer, left the middle of June for Fairport, Iowa, where he has 
a position for the summer in the U. S. Bureau of Fisheries. 

Mrs. Lay and the other children will be at home the greater part 
of the summer. 



With the Faculty 



The members of the faculty are spending the summer widely apart 
and in various ways. 

Miss Thomas, whose illness at Commencement was the one depress- 
ing feature of that season, was able to leave the School at the end of 
Commencement week and spent June with the family of her brother, 
Rev. A. S. Thomas, in Cheraw, South Carolina. Her health is very 
much improved. She went July 5 to Columbia University for the 
summer course of six weeks. Her New York City address is 417 
West 120th Street. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Mademoiselle Rudnicka went direct from the School to New York 
City where she took an active part in the Allied Bazaar which aroused 
so much interest in New York during the month of June, and was 
the means of raising more than a million and a half dollars for the 
needs of the sufferers in the countries of the Allies. Froni New York 
City she went to Chautauqua, N. Y., for a protracted stay. 

Mr. Owen, with Mrs. Owen and the young Miss Owen, left the first 
of June for Flat Rock, where he will spend the summer, having charge 
of the organ at the Church of St. John in the Wilderness in Flat 
Rock, and teaching a private class of music pupils. 

Miss Davis went from St. Mary's to Boston for her summer course 
with Miss Edith Herrick, and will spend the latter part of the summer 
at her home in Elmira, N. Y. 

Miss Bottum, after remaining at St. Mary's through the Confer- 
ence, left for Nashville, Tenn., where she will study for the twelve 
weeks session at the George Peabody School for Teachers. 

Miss Urquhart, after visiting friends in Raleigh and Winston- 
Salem, went early in July to her home at Ashfield, Mass., to be with 
her parents in the absence of her brother, who was called to the 
Mexican border with the New York soldiers. Miss den is spending 
the summer in New York ; and Miss Snook is at her home in Bagdad, 
Kentucky. 

"Miss Katie" is as yet in Fayetteville ; Miss Robins again accom- 
panied a number of her girls to Miss Gwyn's summer Camp Wayeh at 
Springdale, N. C, for July. 

Miss Abbott stopped over for a time in New York City before 
getting to her home at Union Springs, N. Y. ; Miss Shields is at 
home in Scotland Neck for the summer ; and Miss Roberts is studying 
in New York City. 

After visiting her friends, the Baynes, at Manchester, Miss Shull 
visited Miss Metcalf in Chicago, where they saw a good deal of Mrs. 
Bottum, who is also there ; and from Chicago Miss Shull went on to 
her home in Missoula, Montana. 

Miss Lillian Fenner finished her work at St. Mary's June 15th, 
and is visiting relatives in Washington and Baltimore, while Miss 
Clara expects to spend most of the summer at home in Raleigh. 



The St. Maby's Muse 9 

Miss Dowd, with her friend, Miss Hanckel, is spending the vaca- 
tion on the coast of Maine; Miss Seymour is at her home in New 
England, and Miss Lee is summering quietly at her home in Raleigh. 

Mr. Stone is traveling for the School during June and July, and 
Miss Sutton and Miss Margaret Bottum and Mr. Cruikshank are 
looking; after the summer work at the School. 



Alumnae Marriages 

Wallen'born-McKenzie. On Saturday, May 13th, at Salisbury, N. C, Miss 
Elizabeth Keeling McKenzie (1911-13) to Mr. Peter Ambrose Wallenborn. 

Whitneif-Waring. On Thursday, June 8th, at Bedford Hills, N. Y., Miss 
Elizabeth Waring (1912-13) to Mr. Charles Beals Whitney. 

Ottman-King. On Wednesday, June 14th, at Sewanee, Tenn., Miss Daisy 
Anderson King (1893-94) to Mr. Donald Radebaugh Ottman. 

Hargrove— Edwards . On Thursday, June 22d, at Spring Hope, N. C, Miss 
Helen Marie Edwards (1912-13) and Mr. Walter Clark Hargrove. At home: 
Hookerton, N. C. 

Hatch-Birdsong. On Saturday, June 24th, at Raleigh, N. C, Miss Heber 
Corinne Birdsong (1907) and Mr. James Freeman Hatch, both of Raleigh. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price - - » _ - » «■ - - - One Dollar. 

Single Copies - Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, 
in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

THE MONTHLY MUSE BOARD 

Officers-elect for 1916-17 

Virginia C. Allen, '17, Editor-in-Chief 

Emma H. Badham, '17, Business Manager 

The 1915-16 Board 
Annie Sutton Cameron, '16, Editor-in-Chief 

Senior Reporters 

Mart A. Floyd, '16 Rena Hott Harding, '16 

Junior Reporters 

Emma H. Badham, '17 Nellie A. Rose, '17 

Alice Cohn Latham, '17 

Katharine Wimberlt Bourne, '16 \ Rllaineag Managers 
Fannie Marie Stallings, '16 J J™ 3111633 Managers 

EDITORIAL 



This is the "in between" number of the Muse, for which neither 
the 1915-16 board nor their successors of 1916-17 need feel respon- 
sibility. 

It is, therefore, the opportunity for the Faculty Director to express 
to the Editors who have lately completed their work of love for the 
Muse, the appreciation of the School for the devotion they have shown 
and the efficient work they have done. In the eleven years since its 
resurrection in its present form, the Muse has had no better editor 
or business managers than those who have officiated the past year. 

The Muse and the School will ask no more of the editors and 
managers-to-be than to come up to the record of their immediate prede- 
cessors. 



The Annual Muse 

The eighteenth volume of the Annual Muse first appeared, as is 
the custom, at the Class Day exercises on the Monday of Commence- 
ment week and received its usual warm greeting. 



The St. Mary's Muse 11 

The first copy was presented at the Class Day exercises to Bishop 
Cheshire, to whom it was dedicated, and he spoke his acknowledgment 
in a few fitting words. The dedication says: 

To 

THE RT. REV. JOSEPH BLOUNT CHESHIRE, D.D. 

President of the Board of Trustees Since 1897 

And ever interested friend of St. Mary's 

This eighteenth volume of the Annual Muse is affectionately 

Dedicated by the Senior Class 

For the girls of 1916. 

The volume is of the standard size, hound in dark brown roan and 
stamped in gold. It was printed and bound by The Edwards & 
Broughton Printing Company, of Raleigh ; the photographic work is 
by Horton, of Raleigh ; and the engravings were made by the Electric 
City Engraving Company, of Buffalo, New York. 

The Muse had a warm friend in Mr. M. W. Tyree, whose fame as 
a photographer had spread through the land, and his death promised 
to be a severe blow to the photographic work, but this was ably taken 
over by Mr. Horton, who had long worked with Tyree and done the 
group work for the Muse, and the photographic work in this year's 
Annual is a proof of his artistic ability. The Edwards & Broughton 
Printing Company always puts forth its best effort in the production 
of the Muse which goes to it year by year as a rush job, and the 
thanks of the Muse is due to each of those who had part in its produc- 
tion, but our special thanks go to Mr. Keelin, the general superin- 
tendent, who in many emergencies and in the face of seeming impos- 
sibilities has never failed to produce the book when promised, and to 
Mr. Eldridge, who took the greatest interest in suggested criticism 
and in handling the make-up. 

The book itself, as a St. Mary's production, will go down to memory 
as the "Annie Cameron" Muse. Though the class were agreed in 
their wish for the color scheme and general arrangement as adopted, 
and the Muse Club and the School backed up the Business Manager 
loyally in financing the publication; though the energetic and very 
efficient work of Fannie Stallings as Business Manager in charge of 
the collections was the prime cause of the finances being only a minor 



12 The St. Mary's Muse 



problem ; and though Miss Frances Bottuin again "did herself proud" 
in the decorating scheme, it was the enthusiasm, the unfailing devotion 
and attention to the job and the personal work of Annie Cameron as 
Editor in Chief that made the book, as it has made also the Monthly 
Muse of the year which is now completed. 

The 1916 Annual is a "fat" book, following the style of the 1912 
Annual in having uncut double pages ; it is printed on rough paper 
with the half-tone pictures tipped in ; and the silk lining of the cover, 
the border design of trumpet flowers, and the pictures are all printed 
in tones of brown, making a very pleasing contrast with the black ink 
of the printed matter. 



The Sixth St. Mary's Conference 

In the first week in June, 1910, there was inaugurated at St. Mary's 
the St. Mary's Conference for the clergy and laity of the Carolinas. 
The Conference was the culmination of a plan which the Rector had 
discussed for a long time with many who were interested, and in 
which the Trustees of the School heartily cooperated. It was a plan 
to make use of the School buildings for a week shortly after the close 
of the session for the purpose of a closer bringing together of the 
clergy and lay workers of the two Carolinas for conference on mat- 
ters of interest in church work, especially on the practical side; for 
instruction from leaders in this work; and for general social inter- 
course during the week that they should be together. The Trustees 
extended the courtesy of the School and the guests were entertained 
during the week by the School entirely without cost to them except 
for their transportation to and from Raleigh. 

The first Conference was a success, with about 50 guests resident 
in the School, and except for one year the Conference has been held 
annually since, and it has now come to be regarded as an annual 
event. Only men were invited to the first three meetings, but in 
1914 the Conference was extended to include women. 

The Sixth Conference, in many ways the most successful that has 
been held, met this year from June 5th to 10th, and there were about 
120 house guests, besides a large number of visitors from the city. 



The St. Mart's Muse 13 

The chief topics in these Conferences year by year have been Social 
Service, the Sunday School, and Church Extension. The Conference 
has been very happy in its speakers and the speakers have made a 
deep and delightful impression on their hearers. From the scholarly 
lectures of Bishop Kinsman on Church History, given at the first 
Conference, to the interesting and inspiring addresses of Bishop Lloyd 
at the Sixth Conference lately over, there has been crowded a wealth 
of good for those in attendance, and through them for the interested 
ones at their homes. 

The chief speakers at the recent Conference were the Rt. Rev. 
Arthur S. Lloyd, D.D., President of the Board of Missions, the Rev. 
Augustine Elmendorf, executive Secrtary of the Social Service Com- 
mission of the Diocese of Newark, and the Rev. Llewellyn 1ST. Caley, 
Rector of the Church of St. Jude and the Nativity of Philadelphia. 
Mr. Elmendorf has given the addresses on Social Service at four of 
the Conferences, and wins increasing favor each year. Mr. Caley 
was present this year for the third time and again deeply impressed 
his hearers, lecturing chiefly on the Bible and the Sunday School. 

It was good to note among the women in attendance a considerable 
percentage of old St. Mary's girls, and it is our belief that if St. 
Mary's girls in general were better posted about the Conference and 
realized its value, there would be a largely increased number of them 
in attendance. 

The Conference is open to the clergy and lay people of the Caro- 
Unas, and St. Mary's girls have only to indicate their wish to be 
guests to receive personal invitations. The Conference is not play 
and is to be taken seriously, but the combination of instruction, 
deliberation and social enjoyment has proved a very delightful one. 

The Seventh Conference will presumably be held next year at the 
School in the week of June 4th to 9th, and in the intervening year 
we hope that St. Mary's girls will give it wide publicity. 



"Nell Wilson's" Visit 

The St. Mary's and Chapel Hill Commencement days usually fall 
close together, but this year the St. Mary's days were at their earliest 
point and most of the girls were well settled at home before the 



14 The St. Mary's Muse 



University Commencement began. In consequence, when Mrs. Mc- 
Adoo, with her husband, on her first visit to North Carolina since her 
school days at St. Mary's, stopped for a brief visit to the familiar 
scenes, she found only the ''summer family" still on hand to greet her. 
But she seemed to find things very natural and to enjoy feeling at 
home and introducing Secretary McAdoo to the old surroundings. 

Secretary McAdoo was the orator at the University Commencement 
and, accompanied by Mrs. McAdoo and Mrs. Josephus Daniels, 
reached Chapel Hill by way of Raleigh. They came to St. Mary's 
from the train and then went on to Chapel Hill. The following 
evening on their return Secretary McAdoo was entertained by the 
Chamber of Commerce at dinner, while Mrs. Bennehan Cameron gave 
a dinner for Mrs. McAdoo and a number of Raleigh ladies invited 
to meet her at the Cameron home opposite the School. Among Mrs. 
Cameron's guests were Mrs. Lay and Mrs. Joseph B. Cheshire, Jr., 
who was Ida Rogerson and was a schoolmate of Mrs. McAdoo at 
St. Mary's, and Miss Fenner, who was Mrs. McAdoo's teacher of Art 
while she was a student here. 

St. Mary's girls of today will be interested in recalling Mrs. 
McAdoo's school life at St. Mary's, both because as President Wilson's 
daughter, and the wife of Secretary McAdoo she has been very much 
in the limelight the last few years, and because in her St. Mary's 
days she was. a very active and interested member of the School. 

Miss Eleanor R. Wilson, known in her St. Mary's days as "Nell" Wilson, 
was a student of St. Mary's during the academic years 1906-07 and 1907-08. 

She came to St. Mary's after finishing at Miss Fine's School at Princeton, 
N. J., where her father was then President of the University. Miss Wilson's 
mother and Mrs. DuBose, the wife of the Rev. McNeely DuBose, who was 
then Rector of St. Mary's, were girlhood friends, and it was this connection 
which was the primary cause of bringing Miss Wilson to St. Mary's and 
Raleigh. Mr. DuBose retired as Rector at the end of her first year here and 
she spent her second year under the Rectorship of the present Rector, the 
Rev. George W. Lay. 

Miss Wilson took a deep interest in all the affairs of the St. Mary's life, 
and at the end of her course was awarded the English Certificate at the Com- 
mencement of 1908. St. Mary's girls do not often elect Greek, so that when 
Miss Wilson took up Greek at her father's wish she at once conveyed the im- 
pression of intellectuality, and in 1908 she was the "Statistics" choice of the 
students as the "Most Intellectual Girl." She was a member of the Alpha 
Kappa Psi Sorority, debated for the Sigma Lambda Literary Society in the 



The St. Mary's Muse 15 

annual Inter-society Debate of 1908, was a member of the Muse Club and one 
of the editors of the Muse, for which she contributed some of her drawings. 
She played tennis, organized the Riding Club, and belonged to the various 
little organizations of the day that contributed to make her a complete St. 
Mary's girl. 



Honors to St. Mary's Girls 

It is a pleasure to hear reports from various sources of honors won 
by St. Mary's girls and of the progress they are making in their 
various callings. The following notes will doubtless be read with a 
great deal of pleasure and interest by the friends and those who knew 
the ladies in their St. Mary's days, and will serve as an inspiration 
to other St. Mary's girls : 

Miss Emilie Rose Knox, daughter of Dr. A. W. Knox and Mrs. 
Knox, (Eliza Smecles, "79), who took a certificate in Violin at St. 
Mary's before continuing her music career at the Cincinnati Con- 
servatory of Music and has lately won honors in public recitals, con- 
tinues to receive much appreciative musical recognition. Recently, 
in applying for a scholarship in Frank Damrosch's Institution of 
Art in New York City she was sent by him to his violin director, 
Mr. Franz Kneisel of the Kneisel Quartette, it being a prerequisite 
that Mr. Kneisel should be willing to accept her as his pupil before 
Mr. Damrosch would consider the matter. She found Mr. Kneisel 
in Boston and played for him the difficult Paganini Concerto, and he 
congratulated her and accepted her. Returning to Mr. Damrosch she 
then played before him and was again congratulated. He showed 
her a list of five hundred applicants whom Mr. Kneisel had rejected 
as an indication of the honor which had come to her. Miss Knox 
goes to ISTew York in October to take up her studies in the Institute 
of Art. 

At Winthrop College, Rock Hill, S. C, the winner of the Com- 
mencement Inter-Society Oratorical Contest was Anne R. Mitchell 
(S. M. S.). In this contest, a representative from each of the three 
Literary Societies is chosen the previous year to prepare and deliver 
an original speech. The three speakers represent some nine hundred 
students. Miss Mitchell won for the Winthrop Society. 



16 The St. Mary's Muse 



"Anne Mitchell," who is a niece of Miss Thomas, was one of the 
most popular St. Mary's girls during her year here, 1913-14, was a 
member of the Muse Club, etc., and her honors at Winthrop are a 
source of much gratification at St. Mary's. 

At the commencement of Chicora College for Women, Columbia, 
S. C, it was announced that the winner of the short story contest, 
and, also, in poetry, was Frances Pender (S. M. S., 1913-14). The 
subject of her story was "An Underground Passage," and of her 
poem "The Artist Elf." 

Miss Jessica Vann, of Wilmington, for several years as a younger 
girl a student at St. Mary's (1908-11), and later a graduate of 
Elizabeth College, Charlotte, has just taken her B.A. degree at 
Cornell University. After graduating from Elizabeth she taught 
successfully for several years and is now specializing in Latin. This 
summer she is doing social work in the George Junior Republic, in 
Freeport, Xew York. 

To Miss May F. Jones, of Asheville, has come the very unusual 
honor of appointment as Private Secretary to the Governor. She 
has been in the Governor's office for a number of years, and is now 
promoted by Governor Craig from the post of Executive Secretary to 
that of Secretary. The News and Observer says editorially: 

Women Score Agaix. 

There must needs be congratulations, not alone to Miss Mary F. Jones, of 
Asheville, on her appointment as private secretary to the Governor, but to the 
women of the State as well, for the appointment, outside of any bearing which 
it may have upon the question of equal suffrage, is a recognition of the ability 
of women to hold positions which have heretofore been held as exclusively 
appertaining to men. 

Governor Locke Craig's appointment of Miss Jones as his private secretary 
is one made upon merit and upon service rendered. Under the administration 
of Governor Craig, as well as under other administrations, Miss May Jones 
has demonstrated her ability to hold positions of responsibility, and to per- 
form the duties involved with distinction. As executive secretary to Gov- 
ernor Craig Miss Jones has proven efficient in a high degree, her appointment 
to the position of private secretary being a promotion won by service. 






The St. Mary's Muse 17 

A Call to St. Mary's Girls Interested in Social Service 

St. Mary's girls of the past year will remember with pleasure the 
visit to the School and the talk of Dr. Mary J. Brewster, Dean of the 
La Grange Settlement Training School at La Grange, Ga. It will 
be remembered that the work at La Grange was the special work of 
Rev. H. D. Phillips before he was called to Sewanee as Chaplain, and 
he was succeeded at La Grange by the Rev. H. A. Willey, formerly 
at Mayodan, 1ST. C. 

Dr. Brewster promised the girls at St. Mary's who were especially 
interested in the La Grange work to write them more fully of the call 
to service there, but her letter was delayed until the close of School. 
This letter was not meant for publication, but to be passed around 
among the girls, but we are sure that she will not object to giving all 
the readers of the Muse an opportunity to read it. It is increasingly 
evident that St. Mary's girls year by year are more interested in 
sicial service and this letter is very suggestive. 
Dr. Brewster's Letter. 

My dear Girls at St. Mary's, Raleigh: May 19, 1916 ' 

This letter is at least three months late in being written. The reason is 
that a large mill has been started with double shifts, and the three mills 
already here have added night shifts. The population has doubled, and our 
work more than doubled. Our working force has not increased. All this 
makes me want to make a more forceful appeal to you than I did in January. 
We are hearing so much about preparedness these days. It is just that idea 
that needs to be brought home to the minds of the young people about to 
start out in life. Preparedness to fight for our ideals. We have only to 
look at Europe to see that the day of haphazard fighting is a thing of the 
past. Success for good or evil goes to the most efficient forces. Do we 
believe in the equality and liberty of a Christian democracy? Do we believe 
in an open opportunity to advance according to each one's ability? Do we 
believe in such mottoes as "Noblesse oblige," "Ich dien," "Non ministrari, sed 
ministrare"? Then let us turn from the present day estimate of education 
and special training, expressed in terms of how much money they will help 
us earn, and think of them as preperation to serve our day and generation. 
Only in that way can we come into our heritage as the daughters of the 
King. Otherwise we are nothing but hired servants. A democratic country 
cannot rise higher than the people lowest down, or rather than what they 
have the free opportunity to become. The south now stands in great need of 
a large army of trained men and women capable of doing the best kind of 
work in every department of church and social enterprise, able to be leaders, 
to set high standards, not only for the south but for the whole land. The 
present fluid state of the industrial population here gives a chance to intro- 



18 The St. Mary's Muse 



duce forces that will mold conditions so that in another generation, capital 
and labor will be so welded together with the bands of friendship, having a 
common* interest, that the strikes and labor wars of the north and west will 
be impossible. For this, highly educated girls who are willing to become 
kindergarten teachers and nurses, are needed. The great leavening force is 
Christ working through His body, the Church of his faithful. That is why in 
seeing this work to be done Mr. Phillips saw it as a work specially laid upon 
the church and he found it could not be done without women trained right in 
the field. The Training School here is not to have a school, but to supply, if 
possible, workers able to do the task that must be done if the south rises to 
the opportunity she now has of making a great contribution to the world's 
welfare. Just now the need for nurses is about twice that of kindergarten 
teachers. It is a field of service in which men can not compete. At present 
it is looked upon either as beneath a lady or as to be worked only for the 
money in it. Such ideas never made a Florence Nightingale. The District 
Nurse has called forth some fine women in the north. The Church Settle- 
ment Nurse can be made something even better by the girls of the south. Of 
course these are not the only ways of serving. Daily I long to have a first- 
class woman physician practicing in our community. But that means a 
preparation of four years at college, four years at a medical college, and two 
more years in a hospital as interne. 

This means a devotion and love for profession and work that is able to set 
all else aside; yet until there are women to give themselves to it there will 
be a tremendous amount of unrelieved suffering in the world. Only to a lim- 
ited degree can men as physicians reach the confidence that must be had in 
order to give relief. 

All of you who are interested in doing your part to help the working peo- 
ple come to their own, look about you this summer; make friends with a few 
at least — a sewing hour for a few children, embroidery for a group of neigh- 
bors, an hour of reading to some one who does not know how, and as you come 
to know them and see how they live and manage, ask yourself honestly 
whether you could do as well with the same income, household conveniences, 
water supply, space for eating and sleeping, and the number to be provided 
for. 

If you have the chance to do anything of this kind I would be so glad to 
hear from you about it giving me as clear a picture of it as you can, what 
you think ought to be changed and how those changes could be brought about 
without interfering with any one's personal rights. Don't let yourself get 
into the way of thinking that the wrongs in the world are the fault of any 
one person or class of persons. It is all a great network and there is no 
short cut to the ideal community where every one has all their rights. But 
that is the only thing worth working for. I hope that not one of you girls 
will rest content until you have found some way of making your lives count 
for the good of the community in which you live. You can not live anywhere 
without having the chance. To find it you only need to have your eyes open. 
Some day I look forward to having gradutes of St. Mary's taking a leading 
part in this movement. 

"With sincere regards to you all, Mary J. Brewster. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank, Alumnae Editor 

St. Mary's Alumnee Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

Honorary Vice-Presidents - / MrB - L McK - pittin g er - Raleigh. 

{ Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 
President - Mrs. Alice D. Grimes, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - Miss Lucile Murchison, Wilmington. 

Secretary - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



The McKimmon-Iredell Fund 

As announced in the commencement number of the Muse, at the 
recent annual meeting of the Alumnae Association at St. Mary's at 
Commencement it was decided that, in order not to interfere with 
any plans for the campaign for the $250,000 Fund, the work for the 
completion of the $6,000 McKimmon-Iredell Fund should stop when 
the sum of $4,500 was raised. At the time of the meeting there was 
something less than $4,400 in the Alumnae treasury. 

It will be remembered that the Alumnae started to raise the McKim- 
mon-Iredell Fund of $6,000 in honor of "Miss Katie" and Mrs. 
Irdell, "the two best loved and best known teachers of St. Mary's" 
who had given their lives freely to the work of the School, and for 
whom the Alumnae could not do too much. The plan was to invest 
the $6,000 as raised and pay the interest on the investment to the 
two beneficiaries during their lifetime, later establishing Alumnae 
scholarships in their honor. 

The sum of $3,000 was raised and invested several years ago, and 
spasmodic efforts since that time to increase the fund have not 
reflected special credit on the Alumnae. It was a regret to all those 
interested to feel it necessary to practically close the fund without 
having it completed, and especially at such an amount as $4,500, but 
this seemed the best thing that could be done. 

It is now a pleasure to record that through the payment of a pledge 
of $250 by Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, who had already given liberally 
to the fund, and through the wonderfully effective work of Mrs. 



20 The St. Mary's Muse 



Minnie Tucker Baker in arousing the Raleigh Alumnae to. the pay- 
ment of their dues, a task for which she had volunteered at a recent 
meeting, it is now deemed practicable to close the fund at $5,000 
instead of $4,500, while complying with the spirit of the recent 
resolution. 

Thanks to the Ealeigh Chapter, some $4,925 is now available, and 
it is earnestly desired that some of those interested will make a 
special effort at once to raise the $75 which is needed to complete the 
$2,000 in the savings bank. This $2,000 will then be invested along 
with the other $3,000 at six per cent, and form a permanent fund. 
It will be noted that the $500 which has become unexpectedly avail- 
able since Commencement did not come in any part from any of 
those sources which might have been looked to for the $75 needed at 
that time. 

This is a last word. It is hoped that as a last word it will bear 
fruit. Let us have the $75 paid into the treasury at once, and then 
let us feel that even though we have not accomplished all that we 
should, the McKimmon-Iredell Fund is at least permanently estab- 
lished on a fair basis. 



Honors to Miss McVea 

It was with a great deal of pleasure that the news was received at 
St. Mary's of the promotion of Miss Emilie W. McVea from the post 
of Dean of Women of the University of Cincinnati, which she has so 
ably filled for some years past, to the Presidency of Sweet Briar Col- 
lege at Sweet Briar, Virginia. 

ISTo St. Mary's graduate has achieved greater success in the field of 
education than that won by Miss McVea, and through her very inti- 
mate connection with the School for many years after her graduation 
she will always seem a part of St. Mary's, and all those connected 
with St. Mary's will always feel the deepest interest in all that con- 
cerns her. As only the more recent St. Mary's girls need to be re>- 
minded, Miss McVea gratuated from St. Mary's in the class, of 1884 
— the class of which Miss Dowd was also a member — returned to St. 
Mary's as teacher, later became Lady Principal, and continued to be 
Dr. Bennett Smedes' very valuable aid up to his death. 



The St. Mary's Muse 21 

She went from St. Mary's to study at Cornell University; 
she was a student for several years at George Washington Uni- 
versity in Washington City, and took the Bachelor's degree there 
in 1902, and the Master's degree in 1903. She was called to 
the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, of which institution Dr. 
Charles W. Dabney was President, and after two years of successful 
teaching there, went with Dr. Dabney to the University of Cincinnati, 
when he became President of that University. She was first assistant 
professor of English and later dean of women. She has played a 
very important part in the civic and educational life of Cincinnati, 
and that the University and the city give her up with regret is attested 
by the two contributions which we have the pleasure of reprinting 
here for the benefit of her friends and for the inspiration of other 
St. Mary's girls. The one is a farewell address of Dr. Chandler, 
Dean of the College of Liberal Arts of the University of Cincinnati, 
made at a joint meeting of the representatives of the various organiza- 
tions in which Miss McVea was interested, held in her honor, to bid 
her good-bye. The other is a letter from Miss McVea's friend, Miss 
Josephine Simrall, of Cincinnati, to Miss McVea's sister Helen, who 
is Mrs. Bosworth Smith, of Chattanooga. 

At the recent Commencement the University of Cincinnati con- 
ferred on Miss McVea the degree of Doctor of Letters (Litt.D.) as a 
mark of appreciation of her and her services. 



Dr. Chandler's Address at the Meeting in Honor of 
Miss McVea, June 3, 1916 

The poet Lamartine remarked that "There is a woman at the 
beginning of all good things." Certainly, a woman is at the begin- 
ning and end of our meeting tonight. We have assembled in sadness 
and in joy ; in sadness because we are to surfer the loss of one of our 
foremost citizens ; in joy because we recognize the worth of her service 
to the community and the fact that this service is appreciated beyond 
our borders. 

For twelve years Miss McVea has played an increasingly important 
role in the drama of daily life in Cincinnati. She has been an 



22 The St. Mary's Muse 



inspiring teacher, an administrator and leader in the higher education 
of women, the chief organizer of social amenities in our University, 
and a factor in every beneficent civic movement. She has displayed 
her skill in guiding the destinies of bodies large and small, from the 
Woman's Club to the Quills. She has interested herself in art and 
letters and equally in philanthropy and politics. She has been a 
fountain of judicious advice to public officials and to weeping school 
girls. I suppose that she has vicariously been in love a thousand 
times, so great has been her sympathy with the confiding young. 
She has been able, also, as few other women, to meet men upon their 
own terms, to discuss with them in a large way their own problems. 
She has disproved the saying of crabbed Martin Luther that, "There 
is no gown or garment that worse becomes a woman than when she 
will be wise." For Miss McVea has shown by her career that knowl- 
edge and wisdom in woman are compatible with sensibility and charm. 

The writers of the seventeenth century were fond of composing 
what they called "characters" — little essays anatomizing the traits 
of the miser, the town gallant, the prude. If I had the skill, I should 
like to paint for you a "character" of the perfect Dean of Women, 
but instead I need only point to Miss McVea. She has possessed, 
I think, six cardinal virtues : capaciousness of heart, capaciousness of 
mind, common sense, a sense of humor that is less common, character, 
and personality. 

Miss McVea has shown herself capacious of heart ; she has not been 
limited in her sympathies to any one class or even to any one sex. 
Most women, I am told, are drawn chiefly to men. But Miss McVea 
has been drawn to women also. Hence her faith in the rights of 
women to industrial and political equality with men, her belief in 
vocational as well as liberal education for women, and — softly be it 
spoken — in equal suffrage. It is her capaciousness of heart that has 
made her quick to feel the flutters and tremors in every virgin breast, 
all those aspirations and alarms of which it ill becomes a mere man 
to speak. It is this quality of heart that has made her the chief 
dispenser of university hospitality, quite beyond her means or any 
downright call to duty. 



The St. Mary's Muse 23 

Miss McVea, however, has been capacious not only of heart, but 
also of mind. Hence her readiness to understand life in its various 
manifestations. She has not been a narrow specialist, content to plod 
a single path in blinders ; she has trained her eye to look abroad and 
her judgment to pronounce upon matters as diverse as edibles and 
ethics, sonnets and sausages. 

Meredith has said that convictions are generally first impressions 
sealed by later prejudices. Miss McVea has had convictions and 
prejudices, but, unlike some women, she has been able to give reasons 
a-plenty for the faith that was in her. Her breadth of mind has been 
negatively shown in her freedom from petty jealousies and envy. She 
has been intellectually, as well as emotionally, generous. She has 
never been a self-protective association. Positively, too, her breadth 
of mind has been shown in her teaching. She has had the power to 
an extraordinary degree of quickening thought in brains endowed 
with an infinite capacity for resisting it. She has kindled in her 
pupils an enthusiasm for whatever is best in art, in science, and in 
conduct. To them she has communicated her ability to distinguish 
between the trivial and the significant, that ability which has been 
termed the touchstone of a liberal education. 

Closely connected with Miss McVea's capaciousness of mind has 
been her common sense. Sometimes this quality is conspicuously 
absent in your intellectualist. Even professors have been known to 
lack it. Victor Hugo held, indeed, that common sense exists in 
spite of, and not as the result of, education. Miss McVea, however, 
has harnessed utility with idealism. She has made clear the value 
of reconciling abstract truths with concrete facts, and she has faced 
practical difficulties in a practical fashion. By her common sense 
the bubbles of the visionary have been pricked and the tears of the 
sentimental have been dried. 

That which has greatly fortified Miss McVea's common sense is 
her sense of humor. Unlike many other fervent souls, she has known 
how to laugh, and laughter has saved her from becoming that por- 
tentous thing — the stern reforming female. In the best meaning of 
the term, Miss McVea has been a new woman ; and, needless to say, 
the task of a new woman in a conservative community is no sinecure. 



24 The St. Mary's Muse 



Her ability to smile with others at her own efforts, or to bear with 
good nature the gibes of opponents, or to laugh cheerily in defeat has 
kept her sane and evenly poised. Her sense of humor, too, has 
peculiarly fitted her to deal with the aberrations of the young, for 
instead of railing at folly, she has disposed of it by making folly 
ridiculous. 

I need not tell you that Miss McVea has shown unusual strength of 
character. With all her tact, common sense, and humor, she has 
never been a compromiser. To compromise would have been easy, 
but she has disdained to yield to pressure or to consult comfort and 
interest in lieu of duty. Of her natural gifts she has made the most 
with little aid from others. She has often done her work in hours 
of extreme weariness and worry. What she is, she has become by 
virtue of her own unflagging efforts — a fine, firm, independent char- 
acter, "A perfect woman, nobly planned, 

To warn, to comfort, and command." 

Finally, I see in Miss McVea not only character, humor, common 
sense, largeness of mind and heart ; I see in her that intangible yet 
invaluable asset — personality. The power of personality drives the 
world. Institutions are but the machinery to make it effective. A 
college counts for little, with all its equipment in buildings, books, 
and apparatus, unless it possesses potent personalities to give these 
meaning. What, after all, is the process of education but the awaken- 
ing to life of one personality through contact with another that is 
riper and richer by nature and experience ? I can assure you that 
in our University, as in our city, there has been no personality more 
magnetic than Miss Mc Yea's. 

But behold a paradox ! — the full force of personality can be under- 
stood only when it is a little withdrawn. It is then realized as a part 
of each of those who have felt it, and not merely as confined to the 
one from whom it radiates. So let this be our consolation, that 
Miss McVea will mean even more to us when she has withdrawn to a 
larger task and higher dignities. We shall not need to examine the 
visible achievements she has left — the woman's building at the Uni- 
versity, for example, now nearing completion as the result of her 



The St. Mary's Muse 25 

thought and enthusiasm. We shall feel her invisible influence still 
shaping our community life, an energy still active within our very 
souls. 



The Farewell Honors to Miss McVea in Cincinnati 

Cincinnati, June, 1916. 

My deae Helen: — I know you will like to hear something of the many 
honors which are being heaped upon Emilie during these last days of her 
twelve years stay in Cincinnati. It is really quite wonderful how, during 
these brief years, she has made herself a part of the life of the City. As Mr. 
Nelson said — after the civic reception which was given in her honor last 
week: "There is no one else in the city whose going would call forth such a 
demonstration as this." And over and over it has been said: "There is no 
one at the University whose departure would be such a loss to the institution 
as Miss McVea's." 

The University News, the Monthly Scribe, and the Lancet Clinic of the 
Academy of Medicine, and the daily papers have all carried headlined articles 
about her — and everybody is looking sad and disturbed and asking: "How are 
we going to get on in Cincinnati without Emilie McVea?" We have wished for 
you so many times these past days, for I know how you would have enjoyed 
and delighted in it all. The reception at the Business Men's Club was quite 
unique in the history of our city affairs. It was preceded by an elaborate 
dinner-party of about thirty covers, given by Dr. and Mrs. Kennon Dunham, 
in Emilie's honor. After dinner we went up to the Auditorium, where about 
three hundred people — a most representative group — were gathered by general 
invitation delivered through the various organizations who wished to offer to 
Emilie their tribute of appreciation and regret over her departure from Cin- 
cinnati. Sarah Withrow presided behind a flower-decked table, in the centre 
of which stood a wonderful old Florentine casket of the most exquisite work- 
manship — the gift of the Cincinnati Woman's Club. Sarah first called upon 
Dr. Dabney, who spoke of his long years of friendship with Emilie and of how 
much she had meant to him personally and to the University. Then a song 
was sung, composed — both words and music — in Emilie's honor and beauti- 
fully give by a chorus from the Conservatory. Then followed the presenta- 
tion of testimonials from the various organizations, and then placing the 
testimonials — some of them beautifully embossed and embellished — in the 
memory-box (the Florentine casket) : the Chamber of Commerce, the Busi- 
ness Men's Club, the Men's City Club, the Woman's City Club, the School- 
masters' Association, the Woman's Teachers' Association, the College Club, 
the A. C. A., the Quills, the McDowell Society, the Hamilton County Equal 
Suffrage Association, the Christ Church Woman's Club, the Social Workers' 
Club, the Faculty of the University — I cannot think of them all, but the names 
I have mentioned will give you some idea of the scope of her interests. You 
will read all the testimonials some day, of course; but Oh! I do icish you 
could have heard the things they said — the sincerity and feeling — the real 



26 The St. Mary's Muse 



appreciation of Emilie's influence and character and what they have stood for 
in our City. It would have filled you with pride, I know, as it did me. 

The program was closed by a speech from Mr. Chandler — one of the most 
beautiful tributes I have ever heard paid in a public speech to any one. 
After the other speeches Emilie herself spoke, of course, and spoke at her 
best, with the simplicity and directness and real fundamental modesty of 
spirit that are so characteristic of her. She is no more "puffed up," as the 
youngsters say, by all these honors than if they belonged to some one else. 
She is not even elated over them — but seems to be smilingly saying to her- 
self, as she said to her audience that night: "Laws-a-mercy on my soul, it 
surely can't be I!" 

When it was all over there were hand-shakings and refreshments; and 
then we were whirled home in a machine, as loaded down with flowers as a 
bridal party or a sweet girl graduate. 

The week has been full of goodbye functions given to Emilie — dinners, re- 
ceptions and teas — and her farewell gifts will surely give you a thrill when 
you see them, from the charming little silver vase presented by the Kinder- 
garten Alumnae, the fountain pen given by the Quills, the exquisite pearl and 
sapphire brooch from the Household Arts Alumnae, seniors and faculty, to 
the "bee-u-ti-ful" gold wrist-watch and bracelet presented by the woman 
students of the University and the lovely silver coffee-pot, exactly matching 
the silver set, from the faculty. Now you can claim your coffee-pot, without 
feeling that you are depriving Emilie. Aren't you glad? And I almost 
forgot the handsome Rookwood picture from the University Alumnae. 

Yesterday, however, was the crowning event of all; for at the University 
Commencement Emilie was given an honorary degree of Doctor of Letters. 
Dr. Alphonso Smith gave the commencement address and he was given the 
same degree, and Mr. John M. Lloyd was given the degree of Doctor of 
Science — but neither of them received anything like the ovation that Emilie 
did. When she was presented, the whole great audience cheered wildly, and as 
the gorgeous Doctor's hood in scarlet and black was put over her head, every- 
body in the great auditorium rose to their feet as though by a single impulse. 
She was one of the guests of honor at the luncheon afterwards and made 
another splendid speech. She has been speaking somewhere to some audi- 
ence or another nearly every day, and sometimes twice a day. At the end of 
the week she goes to Louisville to give an address, and early in July to 
Knoxville for a series of lectures. I do not see how she ever does it all. 

This is an overwhelmingly long letter, dear Helen, but I knew Emilie 
would never write you about her honors — nor even talk about them — and I 
knew dear Mrs. McVea couldn't; and somehow it didn't seem fair that you 
should not hear. I don't think any one in Cincinnati has ever received such 
an ovation. It has really been quite wonderful. Emilie starts forth into her 
new field of work with enough love and good wishes and good will to make a 
success of anything. 

With much love for yourself and the wish that you could have been here to 
share in all these exciting times, I am most affectionately yours, 

Josephine. 



The St. Mary's Muse 27 



IN MEMORIAM 



Mrs. Van Rensalaer C. King, 
Died May 21, 1916. 



Whereas, it has pleased our Heavenly Father to take from our 
midst our loved member, Mrs. Van Rensalaer C. King: 

Be it Resolved, That we, the members of St. Paul's Guild, St. 
Paul's Church, Wilmington, 1ST. C, have lost a valuable member and 
true friend, who, since its organization, has been ever active in all 
things pertaining to the Guild. She was of high Christian character 
and always foremost in any work of the Church, giving of her time 
and means freely in support of the Master's cause. 

Resolved, That foregoing be spread upon the minutes ; a copy be 
sent the family, and a copy sent the Church papers. 

(The foregoing resolutions submitted for publication in the Muse by St. 
Paul's Guild, Wilmington, will serve also as a token of the sympathy which 
the Muse would extend to the family. Mrs. King, as Miss Isabel Rountree, of 
Wilmington, was a valued member of the School in the session of 1900-01.) 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 



206-10 MASONIC TEMPLE 



Success in the Campaign for the Raising of the $250,000 
Fund to pay off the deht and provide additional new build- 
ings, and the beginning of an Endowment Fund is of the 
utmost importance to St. Mary's. 

Think of it, talk of it, and help in every way you can. 



The Dobbin-Ferrall Go. 


"You get them when promised" 


THE STORE OF QUALITY 

DRY GOODS OF ALL KINDS 


Horlroh s Studio 


MILLINERY 


Masonic Temple 


Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 


"Workers in Artistic Photography" 


LADIES' FINE SHOES & SLIPPERS 





Advertisements 



Raleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' 
and Misses' Ready-to-Wear Garments 

Ten per cent off to College Girls 



®fje Jf astfrioti 



Fayetteville 
Street 



KAPLAN BROS. CO. 



ESTABLISHED 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

D. D. JONES 

PURE FOOD STORE 
Phones 667 and 668 Raleigh, N. C. 



rgMMBS 




Exclusive 
Millinery 



RALEIGH- N.C 



THOMAS A PARTE* COMPANY 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Specialty of Ladies' Ready-to-Wear Gar- 
ments and Gossard's Lace Front Corsets 

THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

Candy, China, Toys 
Pictures, Stationery 

HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

Dry Goods, Notions, Suits, Millinery 

and Shoes 
208 Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. 0. 



THE SCHOOL AUTHORITIES 

are at all times pleased to send full information 
ahout St. Mary's on request without charge. 
We should like every one interested to have at 
least copies of 

The Illustrated Catalogue, 

The Books of Views, 

The Song Book. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



BOYUR-PEARCE 

COMPANY 

The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 



Advertisements 



Stationery— College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 

The Office Stationery Co. 

Bell Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. C. 


CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 
Power 

1377— BOTH PHONES— 1377 


JOHNSON & BROUGHTON 
Good Things to Eat 

122 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 


WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

Coal, Wood, Ice, Brick 
122 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. 0. 


S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 0. 






H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 


Wm. Heller 

THE FOOTERY SHOP 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THE ALUMNAE ARE REMINDED 
that a complete Alumnce Register, which should include 
information about all past students of St. Mary's, is 
now in course of preparation for publication. 

Information for this Register is solicited. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH., N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 

Safe, Secure, and Successful 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

R. S. BUSBEE, Secretary 

Insure Against Loss by Fire 
Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

The Mechanics Sayings Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 



Hafapette 



A Cafe which invites the patronage of 
ladies. The girls of St. Mary's will enjoy 
the beauty and convenience of our modern, 
well-appointed dining- place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

Raleigh, N. C. 

THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 

GOLF, TENNIS AND SPORTING GOODS 



MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

104 E. HARGETT ST. 



Advertisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STORE 

Phones 228 

T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies. 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 

DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

12 W. Hargett St. 

RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 
Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 

HOTEL GIERSCH 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 

ICE CREAM 

Phone 123 

CORNER SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS. 

REGINALD HAMLET DRUG STORE 

Saunders Street 

HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 

W. E. BONNER 
Shoe Repairing 1 



Subscriptions for the monthly Muse are very acceptable 
at all times. One dollar will bring the ten copies of the 
Muse published next after its receipt. 



M. Rosenthal 


MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 
VISITING CARDS 


& Co. 


CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY ENGRAVED 


Send for samples and prices 


GROCERS 


Edwards& Broughton Printing 

Company 


WILMINGTON and HARGETT STS. 


Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 




RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 



Raleigh's Leading and Largest Hotel 



Dinners and Banquets a'Specialty 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Co., Proprietors 



Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Cq. 

COLLEGE 
JEWELRY 

128 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


YOUNG & HUGHES 

Plumbers 

Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 

S. Wilmington Street 


WATSON PICTURE AND AET CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades. 


C. D. ARTHUR City Market 
FISH AND OYSTERS 


SHOES! WHOSE? 
BERNARD L. CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street 


KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 
AND SODA FOUNTAIN 


GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance and Investments 


Cor. Fayetteville and Hargett Sts. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tick- 
ets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, as well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
trip to any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. They will 
gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the 
cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you 

H. F. CARY, General Pass. Agent, 0. F. YORK, Traveling Pass. Agent, 

Washington, D. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements 



L. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MAEKET 

Meats of All Kinds 
Raleigh, N. C. 


The Place of Revelation in Ready-to-Wear 

THE BON MARCHE 

Garments of all Kinds for Discrimi- 
nating Ladies 

113 Fayetteville St. Telephone 687 


Calumet Tea and Coffee Company 

51 and 53 Franklin St. Chicago, 111. 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY 


PERRY'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington St. 


Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 

Phone 529 


California Fruit Store, 111 Fayettevllle St., Raleigh 

Fancy fruits and pure ice cream. Best equipped and most 
Sanitary ice cream factory in the state. Our cream is the 
"Quality Kind." Send us your orders. California Fruit 
•tore. 111 Fayettevllle St., Yurnakes* Co., Props., Raleigh. 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH. N. C. 
College Pennants, Pillows, Pictures, 
Frames, Novelties 


Ladies'and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishment 

Oabdwell & O'Kellt, Peopbiktoes 
204 S. Salisbury St. 


ROYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 

Made Fresh Every Day 


HATES & HALL— STUDIO 


JOHN C. DREWRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE" 



Remember the 75th Anniversary of St. Mary's, 
May 12, 1917. 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THK "NIGHT EXPRESS" 

Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



NORFOLK 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 

Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule, Best Service 



H. S. LEARD, G. P. A. 

Norfolk, Va. 



Double Daily Express Service 

J. F. MITCHELL, T. P. A. 

Raleigh, N. C. 




t jWarp's jftose 



Opening Jtuntfier 

(October, 1916 



St. Mary's Calendar, 19I6-M7 



OCTOBER-NOVEMBER. 



September 21: Session regularly opens. 

September 23, Saturday: Reception of tbe Old Girls to the New. Parlor. 8 p.m. 

September 30, Saturday: Annual Reception Alpha Rho Society. Muse Room. 

8 p. m. 
October 7, Saturday: Annual Reception, Epsilon Alpha Pi Society. Muse 

Room. 8 p. m. 
October 8-13: Raleigh Campaign for the $250,000 Fund. 
October 14, Saturday: Annual Reception, Sigma Lambda Society. Muse 

Room. 8 p. m. 
October 18, Wednesday: State Fair Day. Holiday. 
October 23, Monday: Elocution Recital. Miss Florence Davis. Auditorium. 

8:30 p. m. 
October 31, Tuesday: Hallowe'en Party. Gymnasium. 8 p. m. 
November 1: All Saints' Day; FOUNDERS' DAY. Holiday. 
November 4, Saturday: Class Parties. Seniors to the Sophomores; Juniors 

to the Freshmen. 
November 14, Tuesday: Davidson College Glee Club. Auditorium. 8:15 p.m. 
November 18, Saturday: Muse Club Carnival. 8 p. m. 



The St. Mary's Muse 

OPENING NUMBER 

Vol. XXI October, 1916 No. 2 



God, Holy Ghost, Sanctifier of the faithful, visit, we pray Thee, this 
School with Thy love and favor; enlighten our minds more and more with 
the light of the everlasting Gospel; graft in our hearts a love of the truth; 
increase in us true religion; nourish us with all goodness; and of Thy great 
mercy keep us in the same, O blessed Spirit, whom, with the Father and the 
Son, together, we worship and glorify as one God, world without end. Amen. 



Alma Mater 



(Tune: "Believe Me, if All Those Endearing Young Charms") 

St. Mary's! wherever thy daughters may be 

They love thy high praises to sing, 
And tell of thy beauties of campus and tree 

Around which sweet memories cling; 
They may wander afar, out of reach of thy name, 

Afar, out of sight of thy grove, 
But the thought of St. Mary's aye kindles a flame 

Of sweet recollections and love. 

Beloved St. Mary's! how great is our debt! 

Thou hast cared for thy daughters full well; 
They can never thy happy instructions forget, 

Nor fail of thy virtues to tell. 
The love that they feel is a heritage pure; 

An experience wholesome and sweet. 
Through fast rolling years it will grow and endure; 

Be a lamp and a guide to their feet. 

May the future unite all the good of thy past 

With the best that new knowledge can bring. 
Ever onward and upward thy course! To the last 

Be thou steadfast in every good thing. 
Generations to come may thy fair daughters still 

Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove 
And carry thy teachings — o'er woodland and hill — 

Of earnestness, wisdom, and love. 

H. E. H., 1905. 



30 The St. Maky's Muse 



A Personal Message to the Friends and Alumnae of 
St. Mary's School 



The campaign for the $250,000 fund for St. Mary's School has 
been inaugurated. On September 15th I gave up my parish duties 
in Charlotte in order to devote my full time, thought, and energy to 
the accomplishment of this large undertaking. It is a large enter- 
prise, but its very magnitude should inspire us to enthusiasm. I 
write now to ask you to feel as I do about the matter, and that my 
position may be clearly understood; otherwise, it will be impossible 
to accomplish a work of such large proportion. I am anxious that 
you should feel that I am in no sense a mere solicitor of funds, work- 
ing by force of personal energy and persuasion to collect so many 
dollars for this noble institution. Rather, I want you to feel, and I 
want you to make me feel, that I am your representative charged 
with the task and responsibility of organizing and leading a move- 
ment in which all of us are interested, heart and soul. If this course 
is followed the task will not be easy, but it will be possible. 

Not only am I anxious that every one should realize that this is 
a movement in which are interested and working hundreds of men 
and women in North and South Carolina, and wherever St. Mary's 
is known, but I am also anxious that all should feel as I do, viz. : 
that in entering upon this task we are working for the upbuilding 
of a most important part of the Church's work. The cause of Chris- 
tian education has in our generation entered into a new phase. The 
importance of the Church's contribution to the whole work of educa- 
tion is having new emphasis. The recent accomplishment of the 
University of the South at Sewanee, Tenn., in raising a debt of 
$300,000 during the spring is an indication of "the fullness of time."* 
The prosperity of the entire country and the wealth of the Church 
are encouraging assurances of the possibility of our task, if the friends 
of St. Mary's really believe in the value of her services. Seventy- 
five years of usefulness on the part of this institution should convince 
all that she deserves generous and liberal support. In point of serv- 



The St. Mary's Muse 31 

ice she has always stood in the front rank, and a quarter of a million 
dollars raised to remove her building debt, make needed improve- 
ments, and begin an endowment, will put her abreast of every educa- 
tional institution in the entire country. Gratitude and loyalty de- 
mand such recognition. 

The Plan of the Campaign 

A tentative plan of campaign has been worked out, and I hope will 
commend itself to the judgment of all. The work of canvassing will 
begin in Raleigh immediately. A representative gathering of Ra- 
leigh citizens has expressed the opinion that Raleigh should contrib- 
ute 10 per cent of the amount asked for. This speaks well for the 
confidence of the people of Raleigh in the institution. The school is 
filled to its capacity, and the people of Raleigh are anxious to see 
enlargement and improvement. From Raleigh the campaign will 
extend to other towns in ]STorth and South Carolina, inasmuch as the 
Church in these two States owns and is responsible for the school. 
Later on, when the people of North and South Carolina have indi- 
cated in a practical and generous way their willingness to support 
the school, friends elsewhere will be given an opportunity to con- 
tribute. Wherever a St. Mary's girl has gone throughout the whole 
country there is a point of contact with those who may contribute to 
the fund ; but first of all those nearest at home in that section of the 
country best served by St. Mary's School will be offered an oppor- 
tunity of contributing their share. Before the campaign actually 
began, the trustees of the school subscribed an amount that is prac- 
tically sufficient to defray the expenses of the campaign. In addi- 
tion to this a cash contribution of $50 from a woman and a pledge 
of $500 from a clergyman were sent unsolicited to your representa- 
tive. Such amounts and such contributions do not guarantee the 
fulfillment of our task, but they are indications of a ripeness of in- 
terest in the proposition. Larger contributions have already been 
made, and much larger contributions still are expected. 



32 The St. Mary's Muse 

As your representative I shall welcome suggestions as to your ideas 

and plans for the work. I beg that you do not feel that I can handle 

this alone, or that any other persons than yourselves can bear the 

responsibility of success or failure. Let us believe in success and 

pray for success. With God's blessing, success will come. God grant 

us His help in this work for His Kingdom ! 

Sincerely yours, 

Francis M. Osborne, 
Special Representative of the Trustees of St. Mary's. 



The Seventy-fifth Opening 



The seventy-fifth session of St. Mary's began Thursday morn- 
ing, September 21, 1916. The School was formally opened by the 
service in chapel, which was conducted by the rector, assisted by the 
bishop. 

Bishop Cheshire in his address cordially welcomed the students, 
both new and old, and spoke words of inspiration and encourage- 
ment to help them during their life at St. Mary's. 

Besides Bishop Cheshire, Bev. J. C. Ingle, Bev. Dr. A. B. Hunter, 
Bev. Edgar Goold, Col. Charles E. Johnson, Dr. Charles E. Brewer, 
president of Meredith College, and Dr. George J. Bamsey, former 
president of Peace Institute, were present for the opening service in 
the chapel. 

After the chapel exercise the students assembled in the School 
Boom, where they were assigned to their various duties, and the 
school routine was soon in perfect working order. 

There are more students in the School this year than ever before, 
with the exception of the year 1912-13. Eighteen States and twenty- 
four Dioceses are represented. 

With such a large number we hope that this will be a banner year 
for St. Mary's, and that each will do her part in making this seventy- 
fifth anniversary year the best in the history of the School. 



The St. Mary's Muse 33 

Bishop Cheshire's Address 

At the 75th Opening of St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, September 21, 1916 

As representing the corporation of St. Mary's School, I welcome 
you all to the duties and privileges of a new school year. 

As we stand thus upon the threshold of the new year there seems 
to be so much pressing upon us which must be done, so much work 
for busy brains and diligent hands, so many steps to be taken by 
hurrying feet, that there is no time left for talk. Why should we 
waste any of these precious moments in idle words ? We should 
waste no time in idle words. For every idle word God shall call us 
to account. But words need not be idle. Even words of conven- 
tional greeting, of shallow compliment, of social trivialities, are not 
necessarily "idle words." They may speak an amiable and kindly 
spirit ; they may express a real good will ; they may help us to turn 
the sharp corners of daily intercourse without a jar or a rub. They 
are a part of the existence appointed for us by God, in which His 
infinite goodness and wisdom have provided that there shall be small 
things as well as great. Let no one despise the small things of life, 
and let us not begrudge the time we give to kindly greetings and 
to the courteous welcoming of friends, teachers and pupils on this 
first day of our new year at St. Mary's. 

I welcome our teachers, new and old. We miss some familiar 
faces ; we are sorry to miss them. But all gladly welcome their suc- 
cessors. There must be changes ; it is the law of life, the condition 
of progress. The old preserve the traditions of the past, the new 
help us to adjust ourselves to the demands of the future. Old and 
new are incorporated into the life and work of our school. 

We welcome the pupils, new and old, to the opportunities of the 
new year. All over the country schools and colleges are opening, 
and pupils by hundreds and by thousands are crowding their halls. 
JSTothing, I believe, has been known in the past to be compared with 
the general interest in education throughout our part of the country 
during the past few years. There is no need to urge people forward. 
The interest is all but universal. Our own State, which used to be 
accounted one of the most backward, is now setting an example in 



34 The St. Mary's Muse 

enterprise and liberality. Our common schools, our academies and 
higher institutions, public and private, our colleges and our State 
university — all overflow. There is hardly room to accommodate the 
yearly increasing numbers of eager youth of both sexes. Let us 
rejoice that this is so. The young should be diligent and zealous 
in preparing for the responsibilities of the life before them. 

Let me sound just one note of warning — if not of warning, at least 
of caution, of advice! 

To illustrate what I am about to say — The last few years has seen 
a very marked change, especially among people in the North, towards 
the problem of the education of the negro. It is now generally 
understood and admitted by all that it is a mistake to educate a whole 
class of the population without any reference to the actual conditions 
and duties of their daily life. 

I believe there is always a danger of making a somewhat similar 
mistake in the education of the highest classes of our white people — 
the mistake of educating them without any real thought of the actual 
conditions and duties of human life, as God has created and ordered 
it. 

There is need to guard against the tendency to exalt the idea of 
purely personal culture, intellectual and social, as the great aim of 
education without reference to any duty or responsibility to the in- 
dividual, to other individuals, or to society at large. Culture sepa- 
rate from service ! Indeed, the pursuits of the supposed higher 
culture of the individual is considered by many a sufficient excuse for 
the neglect of the most sacred duties and relationships. Self is too 
often made the chief end of culture ! 

Now the true principle of life, sanctifying all culture, is the prin- 
ciple of service — service to God, service to man, service to society, 
service to father, to mother, to husband, to wife, to brother, to sister, 
to friend, to poor and needy. Nothing is too high, too good, too 
precious, to be added to our life and attainments that we may 
thereby the better serve, and be the more profit to others. And noth- 
ing, however high, however good, however precious but is debased 
and debasing when it is sought and enjoyed for mere personal adorn- 
ment or pleasure. 



The St. Mary's Muse 35 

I used to think that it was an unworthy end in our education to be 
seeking that which will return us a gain in after life by fitting us 
for profitable employments. I have now come to feel that even the 
most utilitarian scheme of education which makes a man a useful 
member of society while pursuing his own particular ends is nobler 
than any course of intellectual and Eesthetical culture, pursued and 
valued by the man or woman whose refinement and sensibility re- 
move them from the sphere of the useful relationships and duties of 
life. 

And who, that knows and thinks, but a little of the art and litera- 
ture of the day, is not constantly shocked by the evidences of this 
spirit — of this revival of the old pagan spirit, of a culture whose pro- 
found egotism recognizes no bounds of Christian truth and virtue, 
or even of social modesty, as limiting the exercise of its pernicious 
freedom! All this strong tarnish of the flesh and the devil comes 
from that false principle of culture for culture's sake, untrammelled 
by obligations to God or to man. It is the individual seeking his 
own will and his own pleasures, emancipated from allegiance to God, 
and to God's order in this world. 

ISTow, if St. Mary's School stands for anything, it stands for the 
individual as God's child in God's world, bound to service therein. 
All departments of human thought and human attainments are sub- 
ject to Him, and to His laws of truth and righteousness and purity. 
Nothing is ours to use for ourselves. Nothing is ours except as He 
gives it to us to use, that we may use it for Him and for His pur- 
poses. Culture is a vain thing unless it brings us nearer to Him 
and makes us the better serve in this world in the relationships of 
human life and society. The girl who here developes into woman, 
and learns here the lessons of life as we try to teach them, goes out 
into the world from these walls to be a more faithful and devout 
and humble child of God and servant of His Church, by means of 
what she has here acquired, to be more gentle and patient and mod- 
est, and obedient to the highest law of holy womanhood; to be a 
better daughter, a better sister and more unselfish friend; if God so 
wills, to be a patient and loving wife, and a noble, self forgetting 



36 The St. Maky's Muse 

and self sacrificing mother — by means of the knowledge and training 
she has here acquired, and the lofty ideals she has here learned to 
contemplate. 

Her purpose is service, her inspiration is love, her strength faith, 
her confidence the promises of God, her consolations the communion 
and fellowship of His Church! 

This is what I believe St. Mary's School stands for — this concep- 
tion of Christian nurture and Christian womanhood. I thank God 
that I have confidence that our leader and his associates will main- 
tain it, and advance it higher yet ! 



SCHOOL NEWS 



Saturday, September 23 — The Opening Reception 

The first social event of the year was the opening reception given 
by the old girls to the new on Saturday the 23d. Cards were made 
out previous to the occasion for progressive conversation and dancing. 
Punch was served in the Muse Room, which was attractively decor- 
ated in goldenrod and ferns. On leaving the Muse Room guests 
were requested to register in the Memory Book kept there from year 
to year. 

The reception afforded an excellent opportunity for making ac- 
quaintances and the evening seemed to be thoroughly enjoyed by 
everyone. A. H. R., '17. 

Saturday, September 30— Alpha Rho Reception 

The first of the Annual Literary Society receptions was held by 
the Alpha Rhos in the Muse Room, Saturday night, September 30, 
in honor of the new members. Besides the members of the Alpha 
Rho Literary Society, the faculty and officers of the Sigma Lambda 
and Epsilon Alpha Pi societies were present. 

The Muse Room was tastefully decorated in goldenrod and the 
society banners and pennants. The guests were met at the door and 
welcomed by Nellie Rose, president, and after having passed down 
the receiving line, which was composed of Nellie Rose, president; 
Eva Peele, vice-president; Prances Hillman, secretary; Aline 



The St. Mary's Muse 37 

Hughes, treasurer; Elmyra Jenkins, president of Epsilon Alpha Pi, 
and Eleanor Relyea, president of Sigma Lambda. They were then 
served delicious punch by Josephine Myers and Estelle Ravenel. 

Later a tempting salad course was served by some of the old girls. 
On the side of the plate were favors hidden in a nut shell, which 
caused much merriment. The 9 :30 bell rang all too soon, and every- 
one left with regret. E. J., '17. 



With the Class of 1916 

The Class of 1916 seems to be working hard this year. We wish 
each one success in her particular vocation and want to tell them 
that "all of them are missed." The most popular occupation seems 
to be that of imparting knowledge to the youthful brain as there are 
quite a few teachers among their number. 

Mary Floyd is teaching in St. Stephens, South Carolina. 

Annie Cameron has the first grade of the graded school of Hills- 
boro. 

Selena Galbraith is teaching the fifth grade of the McClellansville 
Public School, McClellansville, S. C. 

Sue Lamb is teaching at home in Henderson. 

Katharine Bourne is principle of the school at Vultare, ~N. C, and 
is assisted by Elizabeth Lay who has charge of the primary depart- 
ment. 

Jo Wilson continues her studies at Goucher College. 

Helen Wright, Rena Harding and Frances Geitner are spending 
the winter at home. 

Fannie Stallings is also at home where she is taking a business 
course. 



With the Girls of Last Year 

The girls of last year who are not back with us are scattered far 
and wide: 

Laura Beatty is in Baltimore taking a special course in gymnas- 
tics; Sara Bacon makes her debut this winter in Savannah society; 



38 The St. Mary's Muse 

Elizabeth Barber is taking a business course at the State Normal 
at Greensboro. 

Margaret Best, Sara Borden, Annabelle Converse, and Hattie K. 
Copeland are at Gunston Hall in Washington ; Violet Bray is busy 
with home duties in Tryon; Anne Brinley makes her bow to society 
in New York. 

Annie Budd and Marye DePass are at the State College for 
Women, Tallahassee, Fla. 

Elizabeth Corbitt goes to New York in November to continue her 
musical studies. We enjoyed a visit from her recently. Elizabeth 
Cross and Charlotte Johnson are at Miss Gwynn's School in Spar- 
tanburg, S. C. ; Katherine Elliott is at Hannah Moore ; Josephine 
Frohne at the State Normal School, Valley City, North Dakota. 

Dorothy Henry, after a long siege of typhoid this summer, is at 
home in Columbia, S. C, for the winter ; Clara Mardre is at home in 
Windsor. She also paid us a brief visit in October. 

Martha McLaughlin is at Salem College; Clara Paul is at G. C. 
W., Greensboro; Frances Tillotson is at home in Moorehead, Minn., 
but expects to continue her music in St. Paul or Chicago a little 
later ; Caroline Walker was very anxious to return to St. Mary's, but 
her health would not permit, and she is at home in Columbia, as is 
Jewel Register in Savannah. 

Frances Waters is teaching in Connecticut near her home; Helen 
Weakley, who has just enjoyed a delightful visit to North Carolina, 
during which we were very glad to see her at St. Mary's, is at home 
in Phcenix, Md. 

We are interested in the others, of whose whereabouts we are not 
sufficiently informed to speak, but we hope to post their friends 
about them later. 

Mrs. Bottum is located this session at Mankato, Minn., where she 
is in charge of Daniel Buck Hall of the State Normal School. Miss 
Abbott has been detained at home and at Saranac, N. Y., all summer 
by the very serious illness of her sister who died in September. 
Miss Holmes is at home in Asheville this winter with her mother. 



The St. Mary's Muse 39 

With the Girls of This Year 

The old girls, of course, are all rejoiced to be back again, and the 
hundred new girls now feel themselves very well established at St. 
Mary's and very much at home. They have made an excellent im- 
pression, which will doubtless be strengthened as time goes on. 

While a large part of the girls, as usual, come from North Caro- 
lina, there is a larger representation from Virginia and the same 
good representation from Georgia, while the Florida girls are not as 
numerous as it was hoped they would be. 

Pauline Donlon, from Oxnard, California, holds the "long dis- 
tance record," while Beatrice Sheldon, of Pawtucket, R. I., and 
Theodosia Foot, of Red Wing, Minn., are "farthest North," and 
Evelyn Lacey, of Sarasita, Fla., is "farthest South." 

Virginia Pope Allen, who left St. Mary's for Randolph-Macon a 
year ago, returns to St. Mary's to graduate. And Marion Edwards 
and Maude Miller, graduates of the Raleigh High School, having 
taken the necessary examinations this summer, are entering as full 
Juniors. 

This year's Seniors, the candidates for graduation, number fif- 
teen ; Virginia C. Allen, Virginia P. Allen, Emma Badham, Frances 
Cheatham, Jeanet Fairley, Georgia Foster, Elmyra Jenkins, Golda 
Judd, Alice Latham, Eva Peel, Eleanor Relyea, Annie Robinson, 
Nellie Rose, Rubie Thorn and Ethel Yates. 

The girls, as usual, are chiefly from the larger towns, and the 
Rocky Mount group has this year the largest number. It includes 
Lou Spencer Avent, Mary Chavasse, Helen Cooper, Mary Divine, 
Helen Mason, Louise Pearsall, Elsie Snipes, and Louise Toler. 

A number of the new girls are following their sisters here. They 
include Mabel Adams, Helen Battle, Emily Sue Butt, Mary Divine, 
Marian Drane, Jennie Dunn, Mildred Ferebee, Margaret French, 
Margaret B. Gold, Laura Hawkins, Sallie Hyman Lamb, Catherine 
Mott, Ella Pender, Susan Smith, and Elizabeth Tredwell. 

Others of the new girls are bound to St. Mary's, along with other 
reasons, by the friendship and influence of older St. Mary's girls, as 
yet better known to the Muse readers. A part at least of Pauline 
Donlon's interest in St. Mary's came from Jennie Bell Boyden who, 



40 The St. Mart's Muse 

herself from Tennessee, spent last winter in California ; and while 
Theodosia Foot was turned to St. Mary's by other considerations, it 
is interesting to know that her mother and Nina Burke's mother 
were girlhood friends, though one of the girls comes to St. Mary's 
from Minnesota and the other from Louisiana. 

The entire Gloucester County group — Emily Sue Butt, Catherine 
Mott, Anne and Elizabeth Withers and Mollie Taliaferro seem to us 
as the younger sisters of Ellen Mott and Catherine Butt, our friends 
of a year or two ago. While Beatrice Sheldon follows in the foot- 
steps of Edith Blodgett of last year. 

Elizabeth Bowne, and Mary Lindsey owe part of their enthusiasm 
to Violet Bray, while Jennie Dunn, Dorothy Powell and Janet 
White are, as it were, descendants of the long list of girls from Scot- 
land Neck. 

Elizabeth Rembert is a niece of "Gussie Jones" (Mrs. D. D. 
Taber), who was an important figure in St. Mary's during her school 
days here, and Mary Louise Nixon is a niece of Janie Patrick (Mrs. 
William Bland, of Petersburg), a great favorite in her St. Mary's 
days. Mamie Richardson is a cousin of Mary Louise Manning, and 
her aunts, the Amyettes ,(Mrs. Stephen Bragaw, of Washington, and 
Mrs. Dr. Manning, of Durham), are St. Mary's girls of a slightly 
earlier day. 

Emmett Curtis and Clara Martin, of Columbus, Ga., are friends 
of Miss Georgia Wilkins, who revived her school day impressions of 
St. Mary's by much appreciated visits last year and this. Katherine 
Coker, of Hartsville, S. C, knows much of St. Mary's from Arabelle 
Thomas, and the group of Charlotte girls, Bessie Durham, Helen 
McCoy, Susan Smith, Carrie Mclver Wilkes and Margaret Yorke 
also naturally feel her influence. 

Carrie Mclver Wilkes is a granddaughter of St. Mary's as her 
mother, Carrie Mclver, was a St. Mary's girl, as was also Margaret 
Yorke's mother, who was Fannie Rogers. 

Alice Williams, of Tarboro, is a first cousin of Katharine Bourne, 
and Penelope Stiles, of Rome, Ga., is a first cousin of the two Elise 
Stiles. 



The St. Mary's Muse 41 

These incidences might be multiplied several fold, but they will 
give some idea of the close connection and community of interest 
which binds St. Mary's girls so closely together. 



Dr. Lay's Visit to Lynchburg 

The Rector takes a great interest in educational matters in general 
and has been especially interested the past year in the plans of the 
Rev. Robert C. Jett, in starting the Virginia Episcopal School for 
Boys near Lynchburg. Dr. Jett is an old friend of Dr. Lay's and in 
formulating his plans he several times consulted with him and in- 
spected St. Mary's. 

The Virginia School opened for students this fall beginning its 
first year in the 75th year of St. Mary's. By special invitation of 
Dr. Jett, who is the first Rector of the school, Dr. Lay was present 
at the formal opening exercises on September 28th. Dr. Lay was 
much pleased with the school which is well planned and beautifully 
located. 

From Lynchburg, by invitation of Miss McVea, the new presi- 
dent of Sweetbriar College, he visited Sweetbriar for the first time, 
and was again very agreeably impressed. Of course all St. Mary's 
girls know that Miss McVea is a St. Mary's girl, a graduate with 
Miss Dowd in the Class of '84, and was for many years Lady Prin- 
cipal here before going to her more recent work as Dean of Women 
at the University of Cincinnati. 

On the return trip to Greensboro, Dr. Lay was a fellow-traveller 
with Bishop Nelson, of Atlanta, ever an interested friend of St. 
Mary's. 



The St. Mary's Conference 

The Executive Committee of the Trustees have authorized the 
holding of the Seventh St. Mary's Conference, which will meet at 
the School, the week of June 4-10, 1917. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price **,,,.,,* One Dollar 

Single Copies - * ' ' » * » * - ' * r Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's 
School, Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and alumnas, under the 
editorial management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1916-17. 

Virginia Caroline Allen, '17 Editor-in-Chief 

Elmyra Jenkins, '17 Exchange Editor 

Alice Cohn Latham, '17 

\ Senior Reporters 

Annie Huske Robinson, '17 



1 



Estelle Strozier Ravenel, '18 ) ,_ 

I Junior Reporters 

Katharine Parker Drane, '18 I 

Emma Hudgins Badham, '17 Business Manager 

Frances Howe Cheatham, '17 

Sara Louise Wood, '18 



.Assistant Business Managers 



EDITORIAL 



A New Volume 

With this issue the twenty-first volume of the Muse is begun under 
a new Editorial Board. Of course we should like this volume to be 
the best that has ever been published, but realizing our limitations 
we aspire only to reach the standard set by those who have gone 
before us. But we are going to try our utmost to have a Muse that 
will be worth while and one that our subscribers will enjoy reading. 

To have a Muse that is worth while requires work and we wish 
to solicit the support and encouragement of our friends. We need 
the help of those who have gone before us as well as those who are 
here at present. From those who are in school now we need stories, 
sketches and poems ; from the Alumnse any news of themselves that 
they can give to add interest to our pages. 



The St. Mary's Muse 43 

It would be an ideal state never to have to speak of financial mat- 
ters, but as we have not yet reached that state it is necessary to re- 
peat the petition of our predecessors for subscriptions. Of course 
we know that all of the present day girls are going to subscribe to 
the Muse, as they always do. We want each girl to feel that the 
Muse belongs to her as much as to those who have the responsibility 
of publishing it. If she feels that it is her Muse she will naturally 
wish to do all that she can to make it a success. The price of the 
Muse is a very small matter compared with the money spent for 
other things, and of course each girl wants a record to look over 
when she leaves St. Mary's. And we wish to ask that the Alumnse 
make a small dollar sacrifice in order that they may not only be a 
help to us, but that they may have news of their friends here at St. 
Mary's. Subscriptions and news will always be appreciated. 



Anniversary Year 

The school is seventy-five years old this year. I am sure that we 
are all glad that it is our good fortune to be here during the seventy- 
fifth anniversary of the opening of school, the tenth anniversary of 
the present Rector's connection with the school, and the fiftieth anni- 
versary of Miss Katie. Every girl should feel that she has an es- 
pecial responsibility in making this a great year for St. Mary's. 
The old girls are all proud to be called St. Mary's girls. We wel- 
come the new ones and hope that each will enter into all the activities 
of the year with the spirit of a true "St. Mary's girl." 



LooKing Ahead 



In view of the early possibility of beginning improvements, new 
buildings and equipment that will be made possible by the gifts that 
it is hoped will soon be available, the Executive Committee has 
appointed a Committee on Improvements consisting of Bishop Ches- 
hire, Judge Hoke, and Mr. Graham Andrews. This Committee will 



44 The St. Mart's Muse 

at once begin a study of the needs and possibilities of the school on 
a comprehensive plan that will provide not only for the immediate 
needs, but also for more remote possibilities. This will facilitate any 
final action by the Executive Committee and the Board of Trustees. 



A Word to tbe Aluronae Frorn th;e Rector 

The Alumna?, I am sure, are intensely interested in the welfare 
of the School and all that concerns it. Loyalty is not sufficient. 
Intelligent knowledge is also necessary. I again wish to entreat the 
Alumna? to inform themselves more fully about the school. The 
first and obvious method of securing this end is to subscribe regularly 
to the Muse. Another way is to write promptly to the School for 
any information not contained in the Muse, especially when imagina- 
tive stories, not founded on fact, seem to be abroad. I always wel- 
come inquiries or suggestions from anyone and especially from the 
alumna?. George W. Lay, Rector. 



Resident Students 

Adams, Mabel Janie Arbogast, Louise Hart. 

Albertson, Bertha Sears Ayent, Lou Spencer. . . . 

Allen, Virginia Caroline Avera, Charlotte Fort. 

Allen, Virginia Pope Ayres, Elizabeth Hack. 

Arbogast, Katherine Hutton 



Badham. Emma Httiwtns Brigham, Helen S 

Battle, Helen VanWyck Burke, Cornelia Hine .... 

Batts, Katherine Galloway Butler, Florence Faison . , 

Bowne, Marie Elizabeth Butt, Emily Sue 

Braxton, Sadie Charles 

Chavasse, Mary Irene Cooper, Bertha Dewey. . . . 

Cheatham, Frances Howe Cooper, Helen Clifford 

Clarke, Louise Vo^el Cooper, Stella Eiizabeth . 

Coker, Katharine Chambers Copeland, Hattie Wootten. 

Collins, Mildred Curtis, Emmett 



Daniels, Nettie Carol Dent, Louvenia Jackson. . 

Darden, Katharine Pretlow Divine, Mary Ruth 

Davis, Emilye Donlon, Pauline James . . 

Davis, Sara Lorton Dougherty, Muriel 

Drane, Katharine Parker Dunn, Jennie Walthall. . 

Drane, Marian Durham, Bessie Winston. 



The St. Mary's Muse 45 



Fairley, Jeanet Forester, Margaret Tate. . . . 

Ferebee, Mildred Olive Foster, Georgia 

Fishel, Selma Eugene Freeland, Isabelle Elsie . . . 

Folk, Elizabeth McMorine French, Margaret 

Foot, Theodosia Vernon Lawther .... 

Gebert, Ruth Ward Gold, Margaret Howard 

Gilmer. Catherine Ottley Gregg, Nina , 

Glass, Rainsford Fairbanks Griffith, Marjorie Stewart 

Gold, Margaret Banes Griffith, Mellie Eugenia. . . 

Hawkins, Laura Snowden Hood, Martha Young 

Hillman, Frances Bennett Hughes, Adeline Edmonds . . 

Hines, Brookie Mae Hyman, Laura Bryan 

Holt, Mary DeRosset Hartely, Josephine 

Ivey, Annie S Ivey, Annie 



Jenkins, Elmyra Jones, Mildred Lord 

Jensen, Lucy Katherine 

Kent, Constance Williams Kirtland, Mildred Elizabeth. . 

Kern, Frances May Knight, Emiliza Braswell. . . . 

King, Louise Brady 

Lacey, Evelyn Laughinghouse, Helen 

Lamb, Sallie Hyman Lefferts, Catherine Howland . 

Lassiter, Virginia Heath Lindsay, Mary Ely 

Latham, Alice Cohn Lynah, Marion 

McCoy, Helen Marie McMullan, Emily Camilla . . . 

McDuffie, Annie Ivey McNeill, Hazel Howland 

McLaws, Lallie Hobby McNeill, Helen Crawford 

Marsh, Mary Ellen Morgan, Henrietta Marshall. . 

Marsh, Rebekah Moss, Evelyn Byrd 

Marston, Margaret Spencer Moss, Maude Valentine 

Martin, Clara Mott, Catherine Sanders. 

Mason, Helen Carhart Moye, Novella Higgs 

Merrimon, Gertrude Glaister Mullins, Mary 

Morgan, Florie Bell Myers, Josephine Macon 

Neal, Mary Foote Northrop, Sue Carey 

Nixon, Mary Louise 

Odom, Willie Pierce 

Palmer, Mary Van Cortlandt Pleasants, Rose Madeleine. . . . 

Patch, Anna Whitney Polk, Mary Tasker 

Paul, Lola Almeta Pottle, Minerva Virginia .... 

Pearsall, Rachel Louise Powell, Dorothy Elizabeth . . . 

Peel, Eva Irene Pratt, Agnes Theresa , 

Pender, Ella Banning Pruden, Lina Tucker 

Ravenel, Estelle Strozier Richardson, Mamie Latham. . 

Rawlings, Sarah Littlejohn Robinson, Annie Huske 

Relyea, Eleanor Rose, Nellie Cooper 

Rembert, Elizabeth Harriet Ruffin, Jane Reynolds 



Seed, Alice Creswell Snipes, Elsie Blanche 

Seemuller, Isabelle Jackson Snyder, Helen 

Sheldon, Beatrice Adeline Springs, Margaret Elizabeth. 

Shuford, Kathryn Campbell Stanley, Marianna 

Shumate, Arline Staten, Virginia Hamilton . . 

Slade, Mary Lucia Stiles, Penelope 



46 The St. Maky's Muse 



Smith, Anita Elizabeth Stone, Audrey 

Smith, Jacquelin Sublett, Judith Eleanor 

Smith, Susan Evans Swett, Ruth Doris , 

Taliaferro, Mollte Willford Toler, Carrie Louise 

Taylor, Allyne Hargrove Tredwell, Elizabeth Dalton 

Thorne, Rubie Logan Tredwell, May Baker 

Waddell, Elizabeth Nash Wilson, Mary Collett 

Walker, Caroline May Wingate, Elizabeth Sumner 

Walker, Margaret Louise Withers, Anne Franklin Morris 

White, Janet Paull Withers, Elizabeth Vandegbift 

Wiley, Sarah Virginia Wood, Dorothy Portlock 

Wilkes, Carrie McIver Wood, Sara Louise 

Williams, Alice Howard Woolford, Nancy Polk 

Williams, Elizabeth Virginia .Wright, Josie Grainger 

Willingham, Rosa Lee Craddock Wright, Martha Boardman 

Wilson, Anne Chrystelle Wright, Rena Mason 

Yates, Ethel Caroline Yorke, Margaret Berenice 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank, Alumnse Editor 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

Honorary Vice-Presidents - / Mrs - L McK - Pi«k>eer. Raleigh. 

I Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 
President - Mrs. W. D. Lindsay, Spartanburg, S. C. 

Vice-President - Mrs A. L. Baker, Raleigh 

Secretary - - - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



EDITORIAL 



Tl)e F'Oaocial Can)paigt) 

The Alumnse who are readers of the Muse of course remember 
that the year which is before us is one of very special importance 
to their Alma Mater. Since they heard last spring of the decision 
of the Trustees to take the all necessary step of inaugurating a com- 
paign on a large scale to provide the School with the funds which it 
imperatively needs, if it is to go forward in the way in which all 
those who are interested in St. Mary's feel sure that it must go for- 
ward, they have doubtless remembered that this fall the campaign 
will be on in earnest and that by next Alumnse Day, May 12th, we 
should be able to get a pretty clear idea of what it is to accomplish. 

The acceptance in June of the Rev. Francis M. Osborne of the 
work of directing and pushing the work of this campaign for $250,- 
000, and his promise to give it his undivided time and energy in the 
months ahead, assured those interested that the matter would be 
pushed with energy and ability. Mr. Osborne completed his work 
in Charlotte in August and took up the work of the St. Mary's cam- 
paign in September. He came to the School shortly after the open- 
ing and has been staying here as much as possible since to familiarize 
himself with present conditions and to get even more fully the atmos- 
phere of the place. 

As an evidence of their interest in the matter in hand and their 
estimate of its importance the local Trustees instituted the local 



48 The St. Mary's Muse 

campaign with liberal gifts to the fund. $25,000 was set as a 
worthy share of Raleigh towards the $250,000, and the first active 
step in the campaign was the Raleigh canvass which took place the 
week beginning October 8th. After the completion of the work set 
for Raleigh Mr. Osborne will extend the campaign from town to 
town with the idea of going out from Raleigh to the Carolinas, and 
from the Carolinas to the other parts of the country. It will be a 
number of months before it will be possible to estimate the results 
of the campaign even in the Carolinas, but meantime, every alumna 
and every friend of the School will be thinking about the work and 
furthering it in every way possible. 



Founders' Day Meeting 

It is hoped that this year as far as possible the Alumnse in the 
several towns will make a special effort to gather on Founders' Day 
for at least brief meetings. With the campaign on hand and the 
celebration of the Seventy-fifth Anniversary coming next May there 
ought to be much talk over and no difficulty in arranging a program. 
If however, Alumnse in any town would like to have suggestions as 
to program, or material for a program we shall be very glad to advise 
with them or to forward material. 

Wherever the meetings are held we hope that the letter of Mr. 
Osborne's published in this number of the Muse will as a matter of 
course be read at the meeting and that the Alumnse will cooperate as 
fully as possible. 



The McK'mmon-Iredell Fund 

The McKimmon-Iredell Fund is now complete as amended and 
the Alumnse generally can congratulate themselves on the satisfac- 
tory fulfillment of the purpose for which the fund was primarily 
instituted. 

While not reaching the $6,000 originally sought, thanks to the 
Raleigh Chapter and especially to the work of Mrs. A. L. Baker, we 



The St. Mary's Muse 49 

have gone $500 beyond the $4,500 mark set at the Alumnss meeting 
in May. The Treasurer has invested the $2,000 in 6% bonds in 
accordance with her instructions and now holds for the Association 
$5,000 in 6% bonds. The $300 income will be divided, as has been 
the case with the smaller income heretofore, between the two bene- 
ficiaries. It was the pleasure of the Muse Club from the funds of 
the Muse to contribute the last $35 necessary to complete the $5,000, 
as an evidence of the interest and cooperation of the girls of today 
in Alumnse matters. 



Changes 



Possibly the most striking of the changes of the summer in the 
physical arrangements of the School was the conversion of one-half 
of the old West Rock Dormitory into rooms. It was always felt 
that "Miss Katie's Dormitory" would be the last to be affected by 
the loss of favor of the alcove system, and its conversion into rooms 
marks the close of a process which has been going on gradually now 
at St. Mary's for more than twenty years. The older Alumnse will 
remember that originally the first floor of East Rock and both floors 
of West Rock 3 as well as the third floor of Main Building were all 
large dormitories with the familiar alcoves. This year there are 
only eight alcoves left to mark the old system. "Miss Katie" gave 
up charge of the West Rock Dormitory several years ago, but it will 
bear her name in the affectionate memories of St. Mary's girls as 
long as it exists. 

As the dormitory change marks a passing from the old, so the new 
lights in the school room and library are an emphatic evidence of 
the advantages in some matters of the new. The problem of lighting 
these two rooms has not been well solved in recent years, but the new 
indirect light is very satisfying. The lamps are attractive in appear- 
ance and the lighting is both abundant and agreeable. The lights 
in the library are a class gift of the Class of 1912 which had its 
reunion at the School last May, Miss Patsey Smith and Miss Eliza- 
beth Hughes of Raleigh being the leading spirits, while the lights in 
the school room were installed by the School. 



50 The St. Mary's Muse 

Alumnae Weddings 

Moore-Chamberlain. On Tuesday, August 15th, at Woods Hole, Mass., Miss 
Mary Mitchell Chamberlain (1910) and Dr. Arthur Russell Moore. At home, 
Brunswick, N. J. 

Belvin-Lacy. On Tuesday, October 3d, at Andersonville, Ga., Miss Alice Lo- 
retta Lacy (1913) and Mr. Edward Dobbin Belvin. At home, Meridian, Miss. 

Mueller-Gray son. On Tuesday, October 3d, in St. Paul's Church, Savannah, 
Ga., Miss Lynne Grayson (S. M. S., 1912-13) and Lieut Leo Charles Mueller, 
U. S. C. G. 

Crowder-Sears. On Tuesday, October 10th, at Raleigh, Miss Evelyn Sears 
(S. M. S., 1910-13) and Mr. Raymond Crowder, of Pittsburg, Pa. At home. 

Ragland-Hodgson. On Tuesday, October 10th, in Good Shepherd Chapel, 
Jacksonville, Fla., Miss Anna Rogers Hodgson (S. M. S., 1912-14) and Mr. 
Reuben Ragland. At home, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Zollicoffer-Cooper. On Wednesday, October 11th, at Henderson, N. C, Miss 
Fannie Spotswood Cooper (S. M. S., 1911-13) and Mr. Algernon Augustus 
Zollicoffer. At home, Henderson, N. C. 

Hussey-Pennington. On Wednesday, October 11th, in Calvary Church, Tar- 
boro, N. C, Miss Margaret Pennington (S. M. S., 1906-09) and Mr. Howard 
Summerell Hussey. At home, Tarboro, N. C. 

Smith-Warren. On Wednesday, October 18th, in St. Paul's Church, Green- 
ville, N. C, Miss Myrtle Warren (1914) and Mr. Harry Smith. At home, 
Weldon, N. C. 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to Advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 



206-10 MASONIC TEMPLE 



Success in the Campaign for the Raising of the $250,000 
Fund to pay off the debt and provide additional new build- 
ings, and the beginning of an Endowment Fund is of the 
utmost importance to St. Mary's. 

Think of it, talk of it, and help in every way you can. 



'You get them when promised' 



Hortoh s Stud 

Masonic Temple 



10 



"Workers in Artistic Photography' 



Mary's School Library 



Advertisements 







m 6MME9 






5 

a 



ITARENCH 


> 




m 


j Exclusive 

§ ilillmery 






RALEIGH M.C 








ESTABLISHED 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 


THOMAS A PARTIN COMPANY 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Specialty of Ladies' Ready-to-Wear Gar- 
ments and Gossard's Lace Front Corsets 

THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

Candy, China, Toys 
Pictures, Stationery 






JONES & BLAND 

PURE FOOD STORE 
Phones 667 and 668 Raleigh, N. C. 


HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

Dry Goods, Notions, Suits, Millinery 
and Shoes 

208 Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. 0. 



THE SCHOOL AUTHORITIES 

are at all times pleased to send full information 
about St. Mary's on request without charge. 
We should like every one interested to have at 
least copies of 

The Illustrated Catalogue, 

The Books of Views, 

The Song Book. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



BOYLAN-PEARCE 

COMPANY 

The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 



Advertisements 



Stationery — College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 

The Office Stationery Co. 

Bell Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. 0. 


CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 
Power 

1377— BOTH PHONES— 1377 


JOHNSON & BROUGHTON 
Good Things to Eat 

122 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 


WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

Coal, Wood, Ice, Brick 

122 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. 0. 


S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 0. 


H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 


Wm. Heller 

THE FOOTERY SHOP 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THE ALUMNiE ARE REMINDED 
that a complete Alumnw Register, which should include 
information about all past students of St. Mary's, is 
now in course of preparation for publication. 

Information for this Register is solicited. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 
Safe, Secure, and Successful 

OHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

R. S. BUSBEE, Secretary 


Hafapette 

A Cafe 'which invites the patronage of 
ladies. The girls of St. Mary's will enjoy 
the beauty and convenience of our modern, 
well -appointed dining- place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 


Insure Against Loss by Fire 
Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

The Mechanics Sayings Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

Raleigh, N. C. 

THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 

GOLF, TENNIS, AND SPORTING GOODS 


HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 


MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
104 E. HARGETT ST. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STORE 

Phones 228 


WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 

ICE CREAM 

Phone 123 

CORNER SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS. 


T. P. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies. 
Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 


DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

12 W. Hargett St. 


REGINALD HAMLET DRUG STORE 

Saunders Street 


RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 


HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 


Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 


Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 


W. E. BONNER 
Shoe Repairing- 


HOTEL GIERSCH 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


New Girl (going to Senior Hall) — "Do you always have to ring the bell 
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Miss D. — "I simply cannot tell the Domestic Science teacher from the as- 
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Send for samples and prices 

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RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 



Dinners and Banquets a Specialty 



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Cor. Fayetteville and Hargett Sts. 



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Washington, D. C. 



J. 0. JONES, Traveling Pass. Agent, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements 



L. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

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EOYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 

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HATES & HALL— STUDIO 



Mr. S. — "Fraulein M., you may read." 
K. S. — Looking for E. in the Muse Room. 
C. M. — "Excuse me, my name is Camilla." 
E. J. — "Where did you go to look for E.?" 
K. S. — "I went down in the Museum." 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 



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DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



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NEW BERN 

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Norfolk, Va. 



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Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Marts School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

75th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 21, 1916. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 9, 1917. 



1. THE COLLEGE 

2. THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
St. Mary's \ ^ THE ART DEPARTMENT 

offers „ 

instruction { k* THE ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 

in these J 5# THE HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 
1 6. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL 
7. THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



In 1915-16 were enrolled 275 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 
Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 
Dormitories. 
Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 
slight to the Scholastic training. 
For catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, D. C. L., 

Rector. 

EDWARDS a BROUGHION PRINTING CO.. RALEIGH. N C 




Cfce 



Ealctgi), J2. C. 



•&>. 



■I ■ 



V 1Q1A « 

K S 




Cfjrfetmaa Jlumfcer 



The St. Mary's Muse 



CHRISTMAS NUMBER 



Vol. XXI 



November-December, 1916 



No. 3 




" God Rest You, Merry Gentlemen " 

(Old Christmas Carol) 



God rest you, merry gentlemen; 

Let nothing you dismay. 
Remember Christ, our Savior, 

Was born on Christmas day, 
To save us all from Satan's pow'r, 

When we were gone astray. 
Oh, tidings of comfort and joy, comfort and joy, 
Oh, tidings of comfort and joy. 

From God, our heavenly Father, 

A blessed Angel came, 
And unto certain shepherds 

Brought tidings of the same: 
How that in Bethlehem was born 

The Son of God by Name. 
Oh, tidings, etc. 



The Shepherds at those tidings 

Rejoiced much in mind, 
And left their flocks a-feeding, 

In tempest, storm, and wind, 
And went to Bethlehem straightway 

The Son of God to find. 
Oh, tidings, etc. 



52 The St. Mary's Muse 



And when they came to Bethlehem, 
Where our dear Saviour lay, 

They found Him in a manger, 
Where oxen feed on hay; 

His Mother Mary, kneeling down, 
Unto the Lord did pray. 

Oh, tidings, etc. 

Now to the Lord sing praises, 
All you within this place, 

And with true love and brotherhood 
Each other now embrace; 

This holy tide of Christmas 
All other doth deface. 

Oh, tidings, etc. 



A Christmas Story 

Alline Hughes, '18. 

Across the clear coldness of the December afternoon the setting sun 
sent its rosy beams to rest on the wan face of an invalid. At the 
warm touch of these last rays the sufferer glanced up and caught sight 
of the crimson glow. 

"Ah !" she exclaimed, bitterly, "it is bloody. Help me to bed, 
Betty ; I cannot bear these gorgeous sunsets. To think of him there 
on the field of battle, perhaps casting his last glance at this very 
sunset ! Oh, my son, my son ! Why must you go into this cruel 
war?" 

Biting her lips to keep back the bitter, sarcastic words, the little 
white-robed nurse gently assisted Lady Gray to the big carved bed 
which she prized greatly as having been used by generations of 
Grays. 

After the proud, lonely old gentlewoman fell into a brief disturbed 
slumber the gentle face of the little nurse broke into a pitying smile 
as she gazed tenderly at the wan, aristocratic face on the pillow. 
Then seating herself by the window, she took advantage of the linger- 
ing daylight to sew busily on a childish toy, and dreamed of things 
far away. 



The St. Mary's Muse 53 

"Child, why are you crying ?" Betty started, to find the old lady 
in the bed watching her with an unusually gentle expression on her 
face. "Come, tell me all about it, Betty, my dear." She smiled 
encouragingly. 

"Lady Gray, I should not disturb you with my troubles ; but some- 
times I cannot keep them from my mind. Sister Grace has not heard 
from John in months, and she wrote me today that little Grace and 
Jack cry for their father and talk of Santa Claus, when she has not 
the heart to prepare for Christmas. And, oh, Lady Gray, my father, 
my dear old, gray-haired father, lying in the trenches amidst the 
bursting shells, and suffering, may be, far away from me! I was 
wild to go with him, but Grace and her children need me here, and I 
was forced to stay in England." 

At this outburst Lady Gray fortunately forgot that she was the 
widow of the late Lord Eldredge Gray, and the two women wept in 
each others' arms with the common sympathy which knits all human- 
kind. 

Indeed, so absorbed were they that they had not even heard the 
excitement outside. There was the sound of running feet and ex- 
cited voices, a peculiar clattering sound, and then the door burst open. 
Blinded by the sudden light from the open door, Lady Gray looked 
guiltily up into the merry face of a tall man on crutches. 

"My son !" "Robert !" "Betty !" And before either of the women 
could speak they were almost smothered in a bearlike hug, and all 
three gabbled at once in their efforts to explain. 

"Mother," said Robert, happily, at last, "this is Miss Elizabeth 
Trenton, the daughter of the notable Colonel Herbert Trenton of the 
Eighteenth Regiment. I must confess that just before I sailed she 
promised to marry me on my return, and that we planned this idea 
of her staying with you. And now, mother, please forgive us, and 
let's all have a happy Christmas together." 

"My son," said Lady Gray happily, "I would almost forgive you 
for anything now ; and, remember, we must not forget to bring Santa 
Claus to those poor, dear little children." 



54 The St. Mary's Muse 

How Jinl^s Saved th)e Day 

Elizabeth Bowne, '19 

It was Christmas Eve, and the Merryville town clock was striking 
eight. Before it had finished the good folk of the village were gath- 
ering rapidly in the market place and talking together excitedly. 

For fifty years it had been the custom of the Merryville people to 
meet once a year on Christmas Eve, in this same place and at this 
same hour, while Elder Dunwiddy, who had been elder of the town 
church ever since the oldest inhabitant could remember, read the 
Christinas law, which was that every man, woman, and child in 
Merryville put aside all sorrow and trouble on Christmas Day and be 
merry. It was the pride of the people that this law had been kept 
for fifty years. 

In Merryville Christmas Eve had always been a time for rejoicing, 
but tonight the honest people looked troubled; they shook their 
heads and pointed to the great Manor House which stood on a hill in 
the center of the town. They spoke in whispers of the new lord of 
the manor, who it was well known hated mirth and merrymaking, 
and even Christmas itself. It could not be expected that he would 
join in the Christmas revels as his ancestors had always done. 

As they stood talking, a small boy on a mule came riding towards 
them, with a very red face and a mop of sandy hair much disarranged 
from constant jolting. It was Jinks Travers, the stable boy at the 
Manor House. 

It's a great wonder his Lordship would give you a holiday tonight, 
Jinks," said old Elder Dunwiddy as the mule bobbed up. 

"It's no holiday I'm having," Jinks burst out, indignantly; "I'm 
sent to tell you that Merryville must be draped in black tomorrow, 
and that there is to be no mirth in the town on Christmas Day. Those 
are his Lordship's orders, and it's the bold man that will dare to dis- 
obey them." 

He turned the old mule's head and, bouncing up and down on her 
bare back, was soon out of sight, leaving the market place full of 
astounded, bewildered people. The elder was the first to speak. 

"There's nought to be done for it but to do as his Lordship says," 



The St. Mary's Muse 55 

he muttered, and the good people of Merryville departed silently to 
their own little homes. 

Christmas morning came, but with it no signs of mirth ; the shut- 
ters were closed and the doors hung with black, for no one dared to 
disobey the Lord. 

Out in an open field back of the Manor House a group of boys had 
gathered to brood over their troubles. Jinks Travers sat on the 
fence with his chin buried in his hands. Suddenly a small object 
on the ground caught his eye. He jumped down to pick it up and 
was astonished to find that it was a whistle in the shape of a queer 
little man with a queer little mouth. As soon as he began to blow 
on it the boys began to laugh. They laughed and laughed until they 
could not stand up any more, and then they lay down and laughed. 

Presently people began to gather about, and every one who came 
joined in the laughter until it grew so loud that the Lord heard it. 
He started out in great wrath towards the merrymakers, and by the 
time he reached the field he was so angry that Jinks stopped whis- 
tling and the people stopped laughing, and all gazed at the Lord in 
awe. It is very evident to this day that something very terrible 
would have happened if Jinks had not acted as he did. But nothing 
did happen, because Jinks suddenly began to whistle again and the 
grim Lord of the Manor began to laugh, and all the people took hands 
and laughed, too. They laughed till they choked, and they choked 
till they wept until the ground was wet with their tears, and they all 
declared it was the jolliest Christmas they had ever known. 



Mister "Pun^in's" Face 

(With Apologies to Uncle Remus) 

Ethel Yates, '17 

It was on All Hallows night, after the party in the big parlors, 
when the little boy stole away to Uncle Remus's cabin. The old man 
had just come in from the corn-shucking in the barn and had settled 
himself for a peaceful smoke. The little boy laid a friendly hand 
on the old negro's shoulder and his inquisitive mind could remain 
quiet no longer. 



56 The St. Mary's Muse 

"Uncle Remus," he commenced, "why does my mother have those 
ugly, grinning faces on the front step posts on Hallowe'en night ?" 

"Law, honey, ain't you know'd about dat ?" replied the old darkey, 
taking a long puff at his corn-cob pipe. 

"Wal, it happened dis yer way. Der warn't nothin to eat in der 
fields. De corn all wizened up en died, de ter backer jest rot in de 
furrows, en t'awn't nothin' a-tall fer Mister Field Rat en his'n 
family to eat. Honey, you don't know how it feels fer yer middle 
ter be lak a dried-up fig kaze you ain't got nothin' en it ter make it 
bulge out. Too much cookies ain't good fer a little boy, nohow," 
said the sly old man, who had seen the little boy sneak a tea-cake 
from his pocket. Envious Uncle Remus couldn't resist this retort, 
for cookies, and especially Miss Sally's cookies, "hit jest der right 
spot in yer 'natomy." 

"Well, what did Mister Field Rat eat, Uncle Remus ?" The little 
boy was becoming anxious. 

"Yer gimme time en I'll come ter dat, bimeby. One mornin' 
Mister Field Rat come a-hoppin' along en he spy, he did, a big yaller 
punkin' a-settin' in der field. Der ain't no use sayin' how fast dat 
rat did run ter git home. He jest got der 'fore you or me could say 
'Uncle Remus.' He sez, sezee, 'I dun found a nice punkin a-settin' 
in der field,' en with dat de little teeny rats squeaked en run around 
a powerful lot. Dey so glad dey jump up en cut de pidginwing. 

"Dey went to dat punkin, en Mister an' Miss Field Rat dey 
gnawed straight thru de rin', en dey eat it en round holes. De two 
big sons eats de nose, en de little ones couldn't reach way up, so dey 
gnaws along de bottom. De baby rat jest dug his teef a little bit tru 
de yaller, en hit made dat punkin look lak he was a grinnin' en 
showin' his teefies, too. 

"Now, honey, beings youer a little boy, you ain't knowed dat Mister 
Field Rat en hisn family sleeps all day long en jest creeps around at 
night, en you ain't know dat lightnin' bugs sleeps in de day, too ; but 
dey do." 

"What are lightning bugs, Uncle Remus ?" interrupted the curious 
little boy. 

"Wal, some high-ca-fluting folks calls em fireflies, an dey wink der 



The St. Mary's Muse 57 

cannles around yer near 'bout ebery night. Der lightning bugs hap- 
pened for to see dat nice hollow punkin, en dey 'low maybe hit would 
be convenient to live dar ; so dey took up der quarters in dat punkin. 
En bless yo soul, dat bery next night what come, Mister Field Hat 
en hisn family come ter eat dat punkin. De lightning bugs all wunk 
der cannles at de same time en dey scrape en scuffle der wings in a 
noise lak, 'Jack-yack-yack-yack, Jack-yack-yack-yack,' en de light 
shine out uv der eyes en de nose en der mouf of de punkin en blinded 
Mr. Field Rat en hisn family so dat dey can't see 'cept in dey night. 
Dey neber went back ter eat dat punkin any mo, en news got encircu- 
lated round dat a ghost named Jack hants dat punkin." 

There was a long silence, then the little boy tremulously asked, 
"Uncle Bemus, won't you take me home tonight ?" 



SCHOOL NEWS 



October 7 — EpsiSon Alpha Pi Receptior) 

On Saturday evening, October 7th, the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary 
Society gave its annual reception in the Muse Room to the new mem- 
bers. The guests were cordially welcomed by Elmyra Jenkins, the 
president, and the other officers of the society, and by Mr. Cruik- 
shank, the Society Adviser. Nina Burke and Eleanor Sublett served 
delicious punch, and the tempting salad course with tiny Japanese 
fans as souvenirs was greatly enjoyed by all. The evening closed 
all too soon and every one left with regret. A. C. L., '17. 

October 7 — The Bloomer Party 

The very "pep-piest" occasion of the term was the party given in 
the "Gym" by the old members of the Sigma and Mu Athletic Clubs 
to their new members, on Saturday afternoon, October 7th. 

Promptly at four o'clock an enthusiastic crowd of girls assembled, 
wearing bloomers and middies with ribbons and ties of red and blue, 
the colors of the Sigma and Mu Clubs respectively. 

At first sides were chosen for Captain Ball ; then followed a relay 
race between the old girls. The girls along the side lines were most 
hearty in their shrieks of applause, and they kept up an almost deaf- 



58 The St. Mary's Muse 

ening roar the whole time. The basket-ball game between the new 
girls followed, and it was watched with the keenest interest by the 
girls of last year, who were "just crazy about" the way in which the 
new girls entered into the game. After a short intermission, during 
which dancing was enjoyed, there was a game of basket-ball between 
the last year's girls. Both sides did splendid work and hard playing. 
Between the several games delicious punch was served, and, Whew! 
didn't it taste good and cold ! At five o'clock the girls left, cheering, 
"Bah ! Bah ! Bah ! Sigma !"— "Bah ! Bah ! Bah ! Mu !" 

K. D., '18. 

October 14 — Sigma Lambda Reception 

The Sigma Lambda Literary Society gave its annual reception to 
the new members Saturday evening, October 14th. The Muse Boom 
was beautifully decorated in ferns and purple flowers, the color 
scheme carrying out the colors of the society. The punch table was 
most attractive with its cover of tiny lavender blooms. It was pre- 
sided over by Helen Brigham and Jacques Smith. 

After the tempting salad course was served, the guests departed, 
carrying with them small black cats as souvenirs of the evening. 

A. L., '17. 

October 18-20— The Fair 

Who wouldn't willingly go to school every Monday if we could only 
have a few more Wednesdays and Thursdays holiday? Didn't we 
have the best time ever at the Fair ? 

For days before the school was filled with suppressed excitement. 
"Just think ! Mother's coming Wednesday morning!" and "But my 
mother and father are both coming, and in the car !" and "Aren't you 
thrilled to death ?" was all you could hear. 

The celebration really began Tuesday night, when we had no study 
hall, and when some of the girls entertained "suitors" while the rest 
of us danced. Wednesday morning we sat around the Grove in 
excited groups and watched the crowds go by. About eleven o'clock 
the band was heard, and everybody scrambled down to the front walk 
to see the parade. In the meantime, mothers and friends were com- 



The St. Mary's Muse 59 

ing and going, taking their daughters out, and bringing their friends 
to say "Hello." 

Lunch was a half hour earlier than usual, and at one o'clock the 
happy crowd of us were off to the Fair, the long-looked-forward-to 
event. Late in the afternoon we came slowly home, loaded down 
with balloons, candy, etc., and high spirits not at all dampened by the 
rain. 

Thursday was a day of much-needed rest for most of us ; but some 
few girls went out again with parents, and others to the A. and M.- 
Wake Forest football game. 

It seemed awfully hard to settle down after such a glorious holiday, 
but it had to be done, and promptly at 8 p. m. St. Mary's started back 
to work. A. H. K. 

October 23 — Dramatic Recital — Miss Florence Davis 

On Monday evening, October 23d, in the St. Mary's Auditorium, 
Miss Florence Cathaline Davis, Director of the Department of Ex- 
pression, gave a delightful reading of "Cousin Kate," the amusing 
comedy of Hubert Henry Davies, in which Miss Barrymore played 
the title role a few years ago. 

Miss Davis showed true dramatic talent in her interpretation and 
presentation of the characters of the play, whether impersonating the 
comic part of the anxious mother in Mrs. Spencer or the charming 
character of womanly "Cousin Kate." The reader's ease and sim- 
plicity of manner and pleasing modulation of voice made a strong 
appeal to the artistic appreciation of her audience. 

These were the characters and scenes of the play : 

DEAMATIS PERSONiE 

Heath Desmond -,...«, A young artist of Irish birth 

Rev. James Bartlett The new curate 

Amy Spencer An unsophisticated young countrywoman 

Mrs. Spencer Her mother 

Bobby Spencer Her brother 

Cousin Kate < A bachelor girl from the city 

SYNOPSIS 

Act I 
The scene is laid in the drawing-room of the Spencer homte. 



60 The St. Mary's Muse 

Act II 
Scene: A sitting-room at Owlscot. 

Act III 
The scene is the same as Act I. About half an hour has elapsed since Act II. 

October 30— Trje Fall Athletic Meet 

The Athletic Meet between the Sigmas and Mus came off on Mon- 
day afternoon, October 30th, and was a great success. Notwith- 
standing the threatening weather, both sides had many enthusiastic 
supporters who were "right there" when it came to yelling and cheer- 
ing, and this did a great deal toward making the occasion so suc- 
cessful. 

The first event was the running broad jump, which was won by the 
Mus, though Helen Battle (S) broke all the records of former years 
by her jump of 15 ft, 6 in. 

Second came a very interesting game of dodge ball, in which both 
sides showed up splendidly, but the Sigmas won, thus about evening 
the general score and adding to the interest and excitement. 

In the high jump again the Mus won with the better average, 
though Helen Battle (S) again broke the records with a jump of 
4 ft. 1 in. in which she was closely followed by Nellie Rose (M) and 
Lillias Shepherd (M), each of whom jumped 4 feet. 

The bean-bag race was one of the closest events of the meet, the 
score being Mu 18, Sigma 15. 

Another record was broken by Helen Brigham (M) in long dis- 
tance basket-ball throwing, her throw being 69 f t. ; and the Mus were 
victorious. 

The last event was the relay race, highly exciting as usual. The 
teams were well selected and did credit to themselves and their clubs, 
the Mus being victorious. 

The final score of the meet was announced that night in Study Hall 

amid much hand-clapping, and of course the Mus were very properly 

elated by the 98-55 score in their favor. 

The score was made up as follows : 

Mu Sigma 

1. Bean Bag Race 18 13 

2. Running Broad Jump 15 5 



The St. Mary's Muse 61 

3. Dodge Ball 20 

4. Basket-Ball Throw 20 

5. Running High Jump 25 17 

6. Relay Race 20 

The individual records were: 

Running High Jump.—H. Battle (S), 4 ft. 1 in. (1915 record, 3 ft. 11 in.) 

Running Broad Jump. — H. Battle (S), 15 ft. 6 in.; L. Shepherd (M), 14 ft. 
2 in.; T. Foot (S), 13 ft. 9 in. (1915 record, 13 ft. 1 in.) 

Basket-Ban Throw.— H. Brigham (M), 69 ft.; L. Shepherd (M), 63 ft. 4 in.; 
E. Waddell (S), 61 ft. 4 in.; A. Robinson (S), 60 ft. 6 in.; N. Burke (M)> 
58 ft; T. Foot (S) 56 ft. 6 in.; D. Powell (M), 53 ft. 9 in.; N. Woolford 
(S), 53 ft. 6 in.; M. Hoke (S), 52 ft. 7 in.; ,N. Rose (M)> 52 ft. 6 in.; 
E. B. Lay (M), 52 ft. 2 in.; A. Taylor (S), 51 ft. 3 in. (1915 record, Wad- 
dell, 67 ft. 8 in.) 

October 30 — Y\a\lovie'en 

Hallowe'en was celebrated this year with an unusually gay and 
attractive costume party in the Gymnasium. The great high-ceil- 
inged room was but dimly lighted as Miss Sutton began the Grand 
March and the first of the motley procession entered, their fantastic 
costumes casting on the dark background grotesque shadows that 
were extremely suggestive of spirits and the more than human "hants" 
that walk around on Hallowe'en. Then the lights flashed on, illumi- 
nating a scene of brilliant variety. There were gypsies and royalty, 
Quakers, Puritans and ballet dancers, clowns and gentlemen, adver- 
tisements and Mother Goose Rhymes. All classes, all times met, 
and they laughed together in true spirit fashion. The costumes 
were extremely original, and every participant deserves much credit 
for the skill and ingenuity exercised in her vivid presentation of 
striking types or familiar character. The colored wedding — Miss 
Fenner and Mrs. Cruikshank, with Miss Alexander and Miss Lil 
Fenner in attendance — won much applause, as did also Mr. and Mrs. 
Owen as our friends the "Campbell Kids." The Senior Class went 
in a body, each impersonating some Mother Goose rhyme. Alice 
Latham — the venerable "Mother" herself — capably marshaled her 
forces to the center of the room, where Little Boy Blue announced 
each succeeding rhyme with a lusty blow of his horn. There came 
in turn, Little Bo-Peep, Jack Be Nimble, the Milk Maid, Old Mother 



62 The St. Maey's Muse 

Hubbard, Simple Simon, lean Jack Sprat and his very fat wife, and 
lastly, Mary with her little lamb, which, at every chance Mary gave 
it, baa-ed with becoming expressions of devotion. Another group 
very appropriate when feeling was high with regard to the approach- 
ing Presidential election and most of us were so enthusiastically 
wishing for the reelection of President Wilson, was the party which 
represented Mr. Hughes, an invalid and supported by trained nurses 
on a stretcher, as a part of the triumphal procession in honor of the 
victorious Wilson. 

After the Grand March many made trips through the Witches' 
Cave, undergoing various vicissitudes on the way, but nevertheless 
enjoying the experience. Others paid visits to the various gypsy 
tents and had their fortunes told, or threaded the labyrinth of the 
mystic maze to obtain, at the end, a fortune and a picture of their 
future husbands. Dancing continued pretty steadily throughout the 
evening, and apples, peanuts, and popcorn were served as refresh- 
ments. It was a delightful party, and the large number of spectators, 
if we may judge by their applause and expressions of praise, enjoyed 
it as thoroughly as we who could forget ourselves and be in spirit as 
well as costume beings of a different time and class. 

November I — pounders' Day 

The Feast of All Saints, November 1st, is one of the two days of 
the year which we regard as special St. Mary's days, the other being 
May 12th, the School's "birthday," which we call Alumnse Day. 

Founders' Day is a School holiday, and the spirit of the day was 
especially remembered in the Early Celebration and the later Morn- 
ing Service, when the Rector preached an appropriate sermon. 

The usual Intersociety Meeting was held in the Parlor after 
lunch, where Annie Robinson expressed the sentiment of present 
day girls in her brief sketch of "What St. Mary's Means to Us," 
which is published further over in this number of the Muse. 

November 4 — Inter-Class Parties 
An Autumn Paety 
Most enjoyable was the Class party given by the Seniors to the 
Sophomores Saturday night, November 4th, in the Muse Room. 



The St. Mary's Muse 63 

The room was artistically decorated in leaves, chrysanthemums, and 
long-leaf pine, with "1918" inscribed on leaves on one wall. On a 
table in the center of the room there was a large pie filled with small 
birds which we pulled out by red and lavender ribbon. Each little 
bird was numbered, and those who had the same numbers acted 
charades, which were the main feature of the evening. After much 
merriment the prize, a pear filled with candy-corn, was awarded to 
Ruble Thorne who gracefully presented it to Estelle Eavenel, the 
President of the Sophomore Class. 

Tea and sandwiches were served, and "Miss Katie" made an appro- 
priate toast to the girls of 1918. 

The Juniors to the Freshmen 

The parlor was the scene of much merriment on Saturday, Novem- 
ber 4th, when the Juniors entertained the Freshmen at a "Tacky 
Party." Everybody came dressed appropriately and the ridiculous 
costumes were a source of great amusement. Various games were 
played and during the "Grand March" funny little birds were pre- 
sented as souvenirs. Later lemonade and peppermint stick candy 
and apples were passed around. 

Miss Emilye Davis was awarded the prize for "the tackiest" — a 
lovely tin cup and spoon. When the bell rang at 9 :30, all left with a 
great deal of regret, declaring this to have been "one of the most 
enjoyable occasions of the season." B. Folk. 

Novernber 10 — Thje Tollefsen Trio: Peace-St. Mary's 
Concert Series 

On Friday evening, November 10th, in the St. Mary's Auditorium, 
the fifth series of Peace-St. Mary's Concerts was inaugurated with 
a delightful concert by the Tollefsen Trio — Mr. Carl IT. Tollefsen, 
violin, Mme, Schnabel-Tollefsen, piano, and Mr. Willem Durieux, 
violoncello. 

The Peace-St. Mary's Concerts, bringing together the student- 
bodies of the two schools each year, are always very pleasant occa- 
sions, and the fine musicianship of the artists made this concert 
especially enjoyable. 

This was the program: 



64 The St. Mary's Muse 



I. Trio in E Major, Opus 99 Mozart 

Allegro 

Andante grazioso 
Allegro 
II. Trios: 

(a) Bolero Femandez-Arbos 

(b) Elegie (in Memoriam) Arensky 

(c) Vivace from Opus 72 Godard 

III. Trio, A Minor, Opus 50 Tschaikowsky 

Tema con variazioni 

November II — A Muse Club Party 

Mr. Cruikshank entertained the members of the Muse Club Satur- 
day evening, jSTovember 11th, in the Muse Eoom. The lights were 
covered with delicately tinted lanterns which shed a soft glow over 
the room. The tablecloth was bordered with turkeys, and the doilies 
were alternately of leaves and small turkeys. A huge bowl of yellow 
chrysanthemums with brass candlesticks on either side was in the 
center of the table. Candles were also placed at each corner of the 
table. 

A "three-course supper" was served by Mrs. Cruikshank, Miss 
Sutton, Alice Latham, and Virginia C. Allen. 

November 13 — Basket-Ball: Mu, 12; Sigma, 5 

One of the most exciting basket-ball games seen at St. Mary's was 
played on Monday, November 13th, being the first game of the season 
between the first teams of the Sigmas and Mus. The score at the 
end of the first half was 8-0 in favor of the Mus. In the second half 
Waddell for the Sigmas threw two beautiful long field goals and a 
foul ; but McMullan would not be outdone, and threw two more for 
the Mus, making the final score 12-5. 

The features of the game were the unusually good team-work and 
the passing of both sides, and the good playing of McMullan for the 
Mus and of Battle for the Sigmas. 

The line-up was : 

Mu Sigma 

Rawlings c Ravenel 

Powell, Brigham s. c Mullins 

Brigham, Glass I. g Battle 



The St. Mary's Muse 65 

Burke r. g Robinson 

McMullan l.f Woolford (c) 

Shepherd r.f Waddell 

November 18 — "The Circus" 

A novel form of entertainment was provided in the circus held 
Saturday night, November 18th, at 8:15, in the Gymnasium. The 
first performance in the "big ring," conducted according to proper 
circus form by a ring-master with a long whip, included a skillful 
display of stunts by accomplished acrobats, an exhibition of perform- 
ing animals, and other circus delights, and in conclusion a grand 
parade of all the participants — clowns, elephants, sea lions, monkeys, 
and acrobats. During the intermission the animal stalls and boxes 
were visited; peanuts, popcorn, and pink lemonade were indulged 
in ; "hot dogs" went faster than hot cakes ever did ; and the side- 
shows — "Madame Trazini, the living wonder," the "Boneless Wo- 
man," and "the head without a body," "Moving pictures of Charlie 
Chaplin and other famous favorites" — were all visited with such 
diligence and by such crowds as proved the success of the artistic 
advertisements and the true attractions of the shows themselves. 

The second performance in the big ring was opened by the Glee 
Club, and there followed a humorous monologue entitled "High Cul- 
ture in Dixie," in which Annie Robinson, large and very black, de- 
picted, to every one's amusement, the old-time mammy's opinion of 
"high culture" and the "cemetery" in which her daughter had ob- 
tained that culture. The same mammy, having sung several songs 
as encores, was followed by a beautiful dance given by Margaret 
Yorke and Elizabeth Tredwell, the Glee Club furnishing the music; 
and then the lights flashed, "Home, Sweet Home" was played, and 
the circus was over, and pronounced a great success. 

November 20 — Faculty Recital of the Music Department 

On the evening of Monday, November 20th, the first Faculty 
Recital of the Musical Season of 1916-17 was given in the x\udi- 
torium by Misses Seymour, Shields, and Thompson, and Mr. Hage- 
dorn, with Mr. Owen and Miss Seymour as accompanists. 

This recital introduced Miss Thompson, mezzo-contralto, and Mr. 



66 The St. Mary's Muse 

Hagedorn, violinist, to St. Mary's audiences, and they, as well as 
the longer-known members of the Faculty, were greeted with much 
enthusiasm. The artistic rendition of the program was greatly en- 
joyed. 

The program was as follows : 

I 

Valse in E major, Op. 34, No. 1 MoszkowsJci 

Miss Rebecca Hill Shields 

II 

(a) "Rinaldo," Recitative and Aria Handel 

( & ) Mignonette Wekerlin 

(c) Gottes Zeit Bach 

Miss Marion Thompson 

III 

Introduction et Rondo Capriccioso Saint-Saens 

Me. Gustav Hagedorn 

IV 

(a) Novelette in E major, Op. 21 Schumann 

(&) Etude D flat major Liszt 

Miss Louise Seymour 

V 

(a) "When I Bring to You Colored Toys" Carpenter 

( b ) Japanese Death Song Sharp 

(c) April Weather Rogers 

Miss Marion Thompson 

November 30 — Thanksgiving Day 

Thanksgiving Day and the brief Thanksgiving holiday passed very- 
much as usual this year, and with the usual enjoyment. The day 
coinciding with St. Andrew's Day began with the well attended Early 
Celebration at 7:50, followed by the special Thanksgiving Service 
at 11 o'clock, when the Rector's sermon impressed the responsibilities 
and privileges of Thanksgiving in this day of world-stress and our 
present prosperity. The annual offering for the Thompson Orphan- 
age had been well remembered and amounted to $65. 

In the afternoon "boxes" were the order of the day for those who 
remained at the School, while a goodly number enjoyed various sorts 



The St. Mary's Muse 67 

of outings with their parents or other visiting relatives, most of these, 
as well as a large party direct from the School, attending the A. and 
M.-Washington and Lee football game, which did not turn out as most 
of them hoped that it would. 

The "pick-up" supper in the Domestic Art Room and more "boxes," 
or the evening at the Auditorium, where the Choir under the direc- 
tion of Mr. Owen rendered a selection in opening the session of the 
Teachers' Assembly, completed the day. 

November 30 — Basket-Ball: Mu, 10; Sigma, 5 

The second game between the first team of the Sigmas and Mus 
was played Thanksgiving morning at 9 :30. At the beginning of the 
first half the score was 2-2. At the beginning of the second half 
Waddell threw one of her special long-distance balls, making the 
score 4-2 in favor of the Sigmas ; immediately McMullan put the ball 
in, again tying the score. Then a foul made by Waddell put the 
Sigmas ahead by one point. Again McMullan threw two long-dis- 
tance goals, one right after the other. Then the whistle blew and the 
game was over, the score being 10-5 in favor of the Mus. 

This was the line-up : 

Sigmas Mus 

Ravenel Center Lay, E. B. 

Mullins , .Side-center (Capt.) Brigham 

Waddell Right forward Shepherd 

Woolford (Capt.) i. .Left forward McMullan 

Robinson Right guard Glass 

Chavassee Left guard , Burke 

December 4 — Jurjior Basl^et-Bal : Sigrrja, 25; Mu, 10 

The Junior teams of the Sigma and Mu Athletic Clubs played 
their first basket-ball game on Monday, December 4th. It was most 
exciting and exceedingly well played. At the end of the first half 
the score was 14-10 in favor of the Sigmas. This made the Mus 
fight with greater efforts in the second half; but the Sigmas still 
proved too much for them, and at the end of the game the score was 
25-10 in favor of the Sigmas. 

The game was characterized by the splendid team-work of both 



68 The St. Maky's Muse 

! 

teams. Special mention must be made of the playing of Foot, Hoke, 
and Tredwell, Sigma, and Powell, Kern, and 1ST. Lay of the Mu. 
The line-up was as follows : 

Sigma Mu 

Powell, Wilson c Foot, Robbins 

Hill, Dougherty I. c Royster 

N. Lay r.f Hoke 

Kern 1, f Tredwell 

Barber r.g Freeland, Lassiter 

Wilson, Hill 1. g Dent, Foot 

December 4 — Miss Llora rioffroar): Peace-St. Mary's 
Corjcert Series 

On the evening of Monday, December 4th, Miss Llora Hoffman, 
prima donna soprano, gave a delightful concert in the St. Mary's 
Auditorium as the second of this season's series of Peace-St. Mary's 
Concerts. She was well accompanied by Mr. R. Blinn Owen of the 
St, Mary's Faculty. 

The News and Observer said of Miss Hoffman's concert: 
Last night, before a discriminating audience at Saint Mary's, a new soprano 
charmed those who appreciate the highest form of vocal art and song litera- 
ture. Reports of Miss Hoffman's recent successes in concert had already pre- 
ceded her appearance here, but the audience was hardly prepared for such 
a magnificent voice nor such a superb interpretative art as that which Miss 
Hoffman disclosed last night. The gods have been kind to Miss Hoffman, 
for they have given her a voice of entrancing beauty, which takes one back 
to the days of Lehmann and Nordica in their prime. The voice is one of 
those luscious sopranos, pure in tone and beautifully colored, and so ample 
is the volume and the range that it is easy to predict that Miss Hoffman 
will walk in the footsteps of her brilliant predecessors who, as Wagnerian 
heroines, were supreme. 

There is a fine intelligence back of everything Miss Hoffman does — first in 
the choosing of her program, and then in the development of the varying 
emotional phases. The program was one which could not fail to meet every 
taste. There was the charming "Lovely Celia" of Munro, delivered with 
simplicity and beauty of tone, and Bach's "My Heart Ever Faithful," with 
more than a suggestion of the classic style. So beautifully and authori- 
tatively did Miss Hoffman sing the Lieder group that one wonders if this 
remarkable young soprano could not set new standards in the singing of 
the German lied exclusively, since she possesses not only the instinct and 
true feeling for German song, but, what is rarest of all nowadays a beautiful 
voice with which to express the wonderful songs of Schumann, Schubert, 
Strauss, and Brahms. 



The St. Mary's Muse 69 



For sheer beauty of tone and tender feeling, Miss Hoffman's singing of 
Dvorak's lovely, "Wird doch die Liebe" might be ranked as the finest sing- 
ing of the evening, while Schumann's "Stille Thranen" has never been sung 
here with more beautiful effect. No less beautiful is Miss Hoffman's singing 
of French, for in her delivery of the aria from Charpentier's "Louise" she 
displayed the full volume of her extraordinary voice and her sensitive regard 
for modern French song. 

The songs in English were beautifully chosen and beautifully sung, 
especially attractive being the "Nightingale" song of Whelpley and "A Lovely 
Maiden Roaming" of Branscombe. 



SCHOOL NOTES 



The greatest theatrical event of some years in Raleigh was the 
visit of Maude Adams. She appeared in "The Little Minister" at 
the Academy of Music on Friday, November 24th, and a hundred 
and twenty-five of the girls and teachers enjoyed the evening im- 
mensely. 

The following week, on Tuesday, November 28th, the Russian 
Symphony Orchestra appeared at the City Auditorium, under the 
auspices of Meredith College, and. more than a hundred from St. 
Mary's were in attendance. 

At the annual meeting of the North Carolina Folk-lore Society 
held in Raleigh the first week in December in connection with the 
meeting of the State Literary and Historical Society, the Rev. Dr. 
George W. Lay, Rector of St. Mary's, was elected president for the 
coming year. 

Dr. Lay was in Norfolk for the greater part of the second week 
in December in attendance at the meetings of the Southern Com- 
mercial Congress, which meetings were of great interest and im- 
portance. 

Miss Janet B. Glen of the English Department, who returned to 
the St. Mary's Faculty at the beginning of last year, has resigned 
her work here to take a position in New Jersey, and so will not be 
with us after the holidays. Her successor has not yet been announced. 

Mrs. Cruikshank delightfully entertained the Faculty and a few 
friends at a tea on Friday, November 10th, in honor of her cousin, 



70 The St. Mary's Muse 

Miss Helen Benners of Birmingham, Ala. The refreshments were 
served by Alice Latham, Virginia Allen, and Annie Robinson of the 
Senior Class. 

Thanksgiving was made the more pleasant for us by the visit of a 
number of the old girls who were here over Thanksgiving Day or for 
the week-end. Fannie Stallings, Annie Cameron, Katherine Bourne, 
and Francis Geitner of last year's class were back, the first three 
having a "day off" from their duties as teachers. Elizabeth Lay, '15, 
was home from Vultare for the holiday. Carol Collier, J 15, and 
Katharine Fairley, both now teachers in the Durham schools, were 
in Raleigh for the Teachers' Assembly, and the guests of St. Mary's. 
Arabelle Thomas was up from Charlotte just because she "couldn't 
stay away," and Miss Elise Stiles, now in training in St. Luke's 
Hospital, I\ T ew York City, stopped over with her friends on her way 
to her home in Georgia for her three weeks vacation from the hos- 
pital. Marie Solomons, now again of Savannah, and who had been 
visiting Louise Harris in Roanoke, stopped over with Rubie Thorn 
on her way home. It was good to see them all, and this year's Seniors 
especially "did themselves proud" in looking after them, mindful of 
the day when they, too, shall be graduated out into the world and 
wanting to come back for a reminder of the good things of St. Mary's. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price ,,,,,,,,, One Dollar 

Single Copies <• ' ' ' - - Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's 
School, Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the 
editorial management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1916-17. 

Virginia Caroline Allen, '17 Editor-in-Chief 

Elmyea Jenkins, '17 Exchange Editor 

Alice Cohn Latham, '17 ") „ 

I Senior Reporters 

Annie Huske Robinson, '17 I 

Estelle Stkozieb Ravenel, '18 ) 

L Junior Reporters 

Katharine Parker Drane, '18 \ 

Emma Hudgins Badham, '17 Business Manager 

Frances Howe Cheatham, '17 ) 

_ J. Assistant Business Managers 

Sara Louise Wood, '18 ( 



EDITORIAL 



And so the time has come at last — the beautiful, wonderful, longed- 
for time! We have counted down to hours and minutes; we have 
scratched off the days one by one on the backs of our "English pads" ; 
and now, at last, our dream is to come true, and we are really going 
home. 

But while we are having such a lovely time let us not forget St. 
Mary's. Let us keep our eyes and ears wide open for any new ideas 
or suggestions we may come across — attractive things to do at parties, 
interesting topics of discussion for society meetings, and all sorts of 
good suggestions for the Monthly and the Annual Muse. 

This is the jolliest time in all the year, and in the midst of all the 
gladness and rejoicing the Muse wishes to be among the first to wish 
everybody a merry, merry Christmas, and hopes to welcome back each 
and every one after the holidays. 



72 The St. Mary's Muse 

Ecoooroy 

What is harder to do than to practice economy on one's allowance ? 
Money behaves in a most peculiar manner; it fades away, one knows 
not where, leaving no footprints — no substitutes — only an empty and 
wondering question in the mind of the spender, "What shall I do 
until the first of next month, when the next allowance comes?" The 
thought of economy is strong for the first few hours after the arrival 
of the girl's check. "I intend to save as much of it as I can," she 
vaguely states, "so I will have some money when I really need it." 

Such pleasant and (for parents) encouraging resolutions are dis- 
pelled with the rapidity of lightning, the moment she finds herself in 
a street with the drug store on her right, the book store on her left, 
and the bakery across the way. 

Girls in general are thoughtless creatures ! They seem to think 
that their fathers have only to turn a crank and money will be forth- 
coming in as large quantities as are needed; at least, one would 
imagine this to be their idea on the subject, if one could judge from 
the careless, thoughtless way in which they spend it. It does seem 
as though there must be something vitally wrong in their make-ups, 
when they are so unwilling to help in the economy which, in eight 
cases out of ten, is necessary for the parents in order that their daugh- 
ters may have the advantages of boarding-school life. 

" [_ V. M. B. 

Belgian Relief WorK 

It has been a great pleasure to have our share in the Belgian Relief 
Movement during these weeks before Christmas. On Sunday even- 
ing, December 2, the interest of the people of the city was evidenced 
by the large audience which gathered in the Auditorium to hear the 
Sacred Concert, arranged by a local committee under the leadership 
of Mrs. Margaret Busbee Shipp, for the Belief of the Permanent 
Blind. The musical program was under the direction of Mr. R. 
Blinn Owen of St. Mary's and Christ Church, and his combined 
choirs appeared in the program, in which Miss Marion Thompson of 
our Voice Department also sang. The Bector had arranged that the 
offering at the morning service on that day, the first Sunday in Ad- 



The St. Mary's Muse 73 

vent, should be given to the same fund, and this offering amounted to 
$20, while the offering at the Auditorium was more than $400. 

As the special St. Mary's contribution to the Belgian Relief Fund 
Miss Thomas suggested to the girls, in November, that each make a 
gift for presentation and sale at a Belgian Relief Bazaar before the 
holidays. All entered heartily into the spirit of the matter, and the 
Bazaar held in the Parlor on the evening of Saturday, December 
9th, was a very inspiring occasion as well as a great success. The 
proceeds amounted to more than $100. 

As a further evidence of interest, at the suggestion of the Rector, 
the girls decided to give up for this year the Christmas Tree presents, 
arranged by the several "Tables" for exchange as friendly "knocks" 
on Christmas Tree Night, and give the amount of this saving to the 
Belgian Fund. 

The entire contribution forwarded by Miss Thomas to the Dollar 
Christmas Fund for the Relief of Destitute Belgian Children, there- 
fore, totaled $118. 



SKETCHES 



What St. Mary's Means to Us, and What We Mean to 
St. Mary's 

Before we came here to school, St. Mary's meant to a great many 
of us the school which our mothers attended, the school at which our 
sisters graduated a year or two ago, and the school to which we cer- 
tainly intended to go. How great a. privilege we felt it to be allowed 
to come to St. Mary's ! 

We are proud, and justly so, of belonging to an institution whose 
traditions and ideals are the highest. What an individual derives 
from the feeling that he is born of an old and illustrious race, this in 
a lesser degree belongs to every member of St. Mary's. But this 
feeling of pride in our predecessors and in what our school has been 
imposes upon us, the girls of this generation and of this year, a great 
responsibility. A year in which a low and foolish spirit prevails 
would do its best to lower the standing of the School, and if there 



74 The St. Mary's Muse 

were many such years, persons who appreciate the elevating influence 
of a great and ancient foundation would no longer send their daugh- 
ters to a place which had lost its most valuable influence. So it is 
for us to see to it that the St. Mary's spirit and standards are faith- 
fully preserved. 

For, after all, it is we, the student-body, who are responsible for 
the reputation of St. Mary's. It is not alone buildings, it is not alone 
the Faculty, it is largely the girls and what they are, that determine 
what the School is. So let us girls be up and doing; let us reflect 
credit upon ourselves, upon our school year, upon St. Mary's and 
her beloved Founders, whom we wish to honor especially today. 

Annie IT. Robinson. 

"Fudging" in t\)e Mail Line 

I think almost every girl at St. Mary's knows what we mean by 
"Fudging" in the mail line. But for the benefit of those who do not, 
I am going to try and give an idea. After breakfast in the morning 
and after chapel at night you see and hear a great confusion — girls 
pushing and screaming, running and calling. Is it a fire or an 
A. and M. serenade? JSTot at all; only the mail is up. Now, you 
happen to be lucky and get a fine place, probably the twenty-first 
from the front. Then you see two or three girls stroll lazily up the 
steps and stand by the radiator in the hall. Those girls' places are 
really at the end of the line, but instead they manage to squirm in 
just about the fifth or sixth place in the line. How do they manage 
it? They say to one of their best friends among the first in the 
rank : "Oh ! I have a letter from so and so, and I am just crazy 
to read it. Do, honey, let me here behind you, 'cause I am just wild 
to see when he is coming." And she tenderly embraces her friend. 
The girl or "fudger" generally has the politeness to ask both the 
girl in front of her and the girl behind her if they mind. ISTo, of 
course they don't, because one person doesn't make much difference 
so near the first. 

But do you ever think about cheating the ninety and nine other 
girls out of their legitimate places when you slipped in ? Do you 
ever tbink about how often, how every day you "fudge"? Do you 



The St. Mary's Muse 75 

ever consider how anxious some other girls are to hear from mother 
and friends ? Do you ever think how those other girls hurry for 
their envied places when sometimes they don't feel like hurrying 
any more than you do ? Then, if you, Dorothy, Susie, Phyllis, Kath- 
erine, Annie May, and Mildred have been "fudgers" in the past, 
please in the future either walk a little faster or stay at the end of 
the mail line where you belong, so that other girls cannot complain 
of your "fudging" in the mail line. E. Y., '17. 



The Honor R°" 

The Honor Eoll for the first two months was announced as follows : 

October 

1. Mary B. Wilson, '22 (15) 92.7 

2. Bessie M. Polk, '18 (15) 92.5 

3. Henrietta Morgan, '18 (17) 93.9 

4. Marian Edwards, '18 (20) 91.8 

5. Eva I. Peele, '17 (13) 91.8 

6. Elizabeth Cooper, '20 (14) 91.2 

7. Henrietta Morgan, '18 (17) 90.9 

8. Elizabeth Baker, '22 (13) 90.3 

9. Eleanor Relyea, '17 (19) 90.2 

10. Annie H. Robinson, '17 (13) 90.2 

11. Lucy F. Lay, '22 (15) 90.0 

November 

1. Bessie M, Folk, '18 (15) 94.6 

2. Eva I. Peele, '17 , (13) 94.2 

3. Henrietta Morgan, '18 (17) 93.9 

4. Katharine Drane, '18 (18) 93.5 

5. Elizabeth Cooper, '20 (14) 93.5 

6. Marian Edwards, '18 (20) 92.6 

7. Eleanor Relyea, '17 (19) 92.1 

8. Mary B. Wilson, '22 (15) 91.2 

9. Muriel Dougherty, '22 (14) 91.2 

10. Elizabeth Baker, '22 (13) 91.0 

11. Allene Hughes, '18 (22) 90.5 

12. Katharine Batts, '20 (18) 90.5 

13. Katharine Alston, '21 (17) 90.5 

14. Helen Battle, '20 (21) 90.2 

15. Emma H. Badham, '17 (15) 90.1 

16. Mary Lindsay, '20 (16) 90.0 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Croikshank, Alumnae Editor 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

Honorary Vice-Presidents - ( Mrs - L McK - Kttinger. Raleigh. 

I Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham 
President - Mrs. W. E. Lindsay, Spartanburg, S. C 

Vice-President - Mrs. A. L. Baker, Raleigh. 

Secretary - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



EDITORIAL 



Tlje Two Hundred and Fifty Thousand Dollar Fund* 

The campaign to raise the all-important fund for new buildings 
and endowment is now well under way. It was not planned for a 
quick effort, but under the active direction of the Rev. Francis M. 
Osborne, the special representative of the Trustees, is being worked 
out along broad lines, Mr. Osborne's belief being that the more solid 
the foundations which are laid the greater the assurance of perma- 
nent success. 

The active work in the movement began with the canvass in 
Raleigh which was carried on actively during October. As a result 
of this campaign, which was pursued with much energy by a large 
active committee of both men and women, with the hearty support 
of the Ealeigh Alumnse, and under the active direction of Mr. 
Osborne and the Committee of the Trustees, the first $20,000 of the 
fund was pledged. 

The campaign was waged along the lines of a Y. M. C. A. cam- 
paign, being instituted by sermons in the Raleigh churches on the 
Sunday preceding the canvass, preparations for these services in 
turn having been made by the goodly amount of information relative 
to the movement gladly published by the Raleigh papers. 

At the Sunday services the Rev. George W. Lay, D.C.L., the 
Rector of the School, presented the matter at the Church of the Good 
Shepherd, where the St. Mary's girls were in attendance, and the 



The St. Mary's Muse 77 

Rev. Mr. Osborne at Christ Church. In the afternoon there was a 
meeting of the General Committee at the Christ Church Parish 
House. 

On the five succeeding week days during which the campaign was 
pushed there were daily luncheons in Christ Church Parish House 
furnished by the Raleigh Chapter of the Alumna? and served by 
them, special speakers making brief addresses at these luncheons. 
At the Monday luncheon President J. I. Foust, of the State Normal 
and Industrial College of Greensboro, was the speaker. The active 
canvass was made by seven committees working in friendly rivalry 
and making daily reports at the luncheons. 

At the conclusion of the campaign the General Committee turned 
the work in Raleigh over to a new special committee which will con- 
tinue in charge with a view to adding $5,000 to the $20,000 already 
pledged and making the contribution of Raleigh $25,000. 

Having instituted the campaign in North Carolina with this can- 
vass in Raleigh, Mr. Osborne goes next to the Diocese of East Caro- 
lina, where he has been doing preliminary work in Wilmington, 
and other points. He is now busy in that Diocese. 



The Seventy -F'fth Anniversary 

The seventy-fifth birthday of St. Mary's on Saturday, May 12th, 
should be a great occasion for the School. The active interest of the 
Alumnae will assure this. 

Early in the new year the details for the celebration will be ar- 
ranged, and announcements of them may be expected in succeeding 
numbers of the Muse. 



Class Letters 

In a school like St. Mary's, where the Senior Class averages in 
number only about fifteen and lives in a building apart, the Seniors 
naturally are thrown very closely together and get to know one 
another very well. While it is hardly natural to expect equally close 
relationship to continue after graduation, there is no question that 
the active interest of each member of the class in each of the others 



78 The St. Mary's Muse 

will continue to a greater or less extent if the class is kept in touch. 
To furnish this means of keeping in touch is the purpose of the Class 
Letter, and it is gratifying to see an apparently greater interest in 
this means of furthering the friendships of St. Mary's days. Despite 
the vicissitudes which these letters undergo as they pass from girl 
to girl, the Class of 1915 has been able to keep their Class Letter alive 
since graduation, and the Class of 1916 has made a good start with 
theirs. It is more striking to see the revival of the Class Letter of 
1905 after it has been nonexistent for a number of years. 

The seventy-fifth Anniversary affords a good occasion for the 
reviving of touch between the members of various other classes, and 
we are sure that it would prove both interesting and profitable if 
class letters were established with the new year, looking to class 
reunions at the School Anniversary. 

A form of Class Letter differing from the ordinary form, which 
circulates from member to member, and is necessarily less intimate 
and therefore less valuable, is found below : 

A November News-Letter of the Class of 1915. 

"They may wander afar, out of reach of thy name — 
Afar out of sight of thy grove, 
But the thought of St. Mary's aye kindles a flame 
Of sweet recollections and love." 

The Class of 1915 has been two years away from the dear shelter of St. 
Mary's. Each one has gone out upon her life work; some are teaching, 
others are in college, while the remaining few are at home or in business 
offices; but wherever they may be, each one feels that St. Mary's is as near 
and as dear as on our own Commencement day. The letters that have come 
to me are overflowing with interest in St. Mary's and good wishes for each 
member of the class. 

Mattie Moye Adams, Elizabeth Carrison, Dorothy Fairley, Louise Merritt, 
Matilda Hancock, Gladys Yates, Sadie Vinson, Florence Stone, and Helen 
Peoples are staying at home this winter. 

At least, Mattie Moye is at home when she is not visiting. Her motto, 
"Pleasure at the helm," is still guiding her from one fair to another, with 
visits to Raleigh, Rocky Mount, Richmond, and Hickory thrown in. She 
spent most of the summer at home with several old girls visiting her, among 
whom was Courtney Crowther. 

Elizabeth Carrison went up to New York by boat the first of July, and 
after a few days strenuous shopping, went on to Newport, to visit her sister 



The St. Mary's Muse 79 

at the training station. As the whole Atlantic fleet was there, everything 
was very gay. She attended a particularly brilliant reception on the flag- 
ship, Wyoming. From Newport, Elizabeth visited a friend at Narragansett 
Pier for a month. She motored over all that part of the country, and, as a 
climax, went on a long trip through Massachusetts, Vermont, and the White 
Mountains of New Hampshire. As she had to give up her plans for going 
away to school, she is studying at home this winter. 

As Dorothy Fairley expresses it, she "hasn't any money-making job as* 
most of the others have," but is content at home. This summer she spent 
several weeks in Asheville and, as usual, enjoyed the mountains. 

Louise Merritt is continuing her music studies at St. Mary's. She is still 
taking piano and organ and plays in Chapel occasionally. 

After having had a very pleasant summer, Matilda Hancock has been to 
several out-of-town dances this winter, the nicest one being at Goldsboro, 
where she saw several old St. Mary's friends. She was highly elated over 
her part in her cousin's wedding on November 17, and stopped at St. Mary's 
on her way back. The pleasure she is looking forward to most is a trip to 
Richmond through the country, Thanksgiving. As a redeeming feature for 
all her frivolous doings, Matilda teaches Sunday school Sunday mornings. 

Gladys Yates is enjoying herself at home this winter. Sadie Vinson spent 
a month of the summer at Littleton, and the rest of the summer at home, 
with several little trips thrown in. She is now at home again. Helen Peo- 
ples is also at home. She paid a visit to St. Mary's a short time ago. 

The last of May, Florence Stone went to Chapel Hill for Commencement, 
then after having a little house party, went back to "The Hill" for summer 
school. Life was most enjoyable there, with several dances a week, picnics, 
etc., thrown in. Florence took Playground work and the Kindergarten 
course, and also University English. Her plans for the rest of the summer 
were given up because of her grandmother's death. This fall she has a small 
kindergarten, and expects to go to Chapel Hill for the Thanksgiving dances; 
also to Washington City at Christmas and to Annapolis for the dances. 

Our college girls are Courtney Crowther, Agnes Barton, and Margaret 
Mann. Courtney is at Radcliffe this year. 

Agnes Barton will graduate at Chapel Hill, and so college is a terribly 
busy place for her. On her way home, this summer "Gyp" stopped over 
on Long Island a few days. After staying home a short time, her good 
times began when she went to visit her sister at Newport, where she had a 
wonderful time swimming, dancing, and driving. She also attended the 
reception on the "Wyoming," and she and Elizabeth Carrison were delighted 
to meet. 

At last Margaret Mann has realized the ideal of her dreams, and is entered 
at Columbia University. She has found New York a wonderful place; feel- 
ing the need of slight exercise, she climbed to the top of the Statue of Lib- 
erty. Margaret likes the school life at Whittier very much, but finds it 
quite different from that at St. Mary's. She intends spending Christmas 
there at Columbia. 



80 The St. Mary's Muse 

Florence Clarke is still in St. Vincent's Hospital at Norfolk. It was quite 
interesting to have her write me a letter while on duty at 2 a. m, ; at that 
hour her patients are quietest. Although the hospital life is very confining, 
Florence enjoys it. She spent the summer there except for two weeks at 
home, and will stay in the hospital Christmas, for she has only three hours' 
off, just as on Sundays. . 

Frances Strong, Maude Hotchkiss, Margaret Bottum, and I are in business 
offices. Frances works for her father. She sends best wishes to every one. 
Maude Hotchkiss is spending the winter with her uncle in Richmond, and is 
private secretary for him on the side. 

Margaret Bottum is our connecting link between the past and St. Mary's 
at present. As Mattie Moye expressed it, "What would we do when we go 
back to St. Mary's if it were not for dear old Margaret Bottum?" 

I am with Mrs. W. N. Hutt, one of the editors of the Progressive Farmer, 
a well known farm paper. The work is intensely interesting, and I am 
more than pleased with my good fortune in being with so delightful a 
woman. 

Now for our legion of teachers: 

Lanie Hales is teaching in the High School in Wilson; Allene Thornburgh 
is teaching in Bay Leaf, a small place a few miles from Raleigh. Edith and 
Edna Mann are both teaching — Edith in a two-teacher school at White Oak, 
where she has the higher grades and music, Edna the primary grades and 
music in a school in Elizabethtown. The "Little Men" spent the summer at 
their country home and of course "enjoyed every minute of it." They like 
teaching so much that they think they will stick to that. 

Carol Collier was just ready to leave for Little Switzerland this summer, 
when the flood came and she was marooned in Goldsboro. She assures me 
that she enjoyed "visiting the family" and doing nothing but eat, sleep, 
and read. Later, she went to Fayetteville for two weeks, and now she is 
back in Durham, teaching. 

After visiting for some time, Anna Belle King attended the summer school 
at Chapel Hill. She went home the last of July and spent the month of 
August going to dances, parties, etc. Now, she is substitute teacher in the 
graded school in Louisburg. She is kept busy all the time and "enjoys 
watching the little minds unfold." 

Pencie Warren has the fourth grade in her home town, Edenton. She has 
to "step lively" to keep her forty-three little youngsters straight. This sum- 
mer she had a lovely trip, spending six weeks at Atlantic City, "The World's 
Playground," two weeks in Washington, and two days in Baltimore. 

"Liz, as was — Miss Lay, as is" says that "for experience, novel, instruct- 
ing, be a country school teacher. This summer she spent six weeks at Vir- 
ginia Beach, attended the Teachers' Institute at Cary, and then went up to 
Vultare. After playing the piano for school marches, teaching the singing 
class, giving a lesson to her private piano pupil, and leading the singing at 
Sunday school, she has no time left for "tears, idle tears, as even a red- 



The St. Mary's Muse 81 



haired schoolmarm is guilty of reading a little poetry now and then, and 
■who could forget Miss Thomas's English lessons!" I forgot to say that 
Elizabeth does a little teaching on the side — just from nine to four. 

Every one sends her love to every one else; is looking forward to one 
more class letter, and to a big class reunion next Commencement. 

Sincerely, Virginia Bonner, '15, 

Class Secretary. 



St. Mary's in the Teachers' Assembly 

The annual sessions of the North Carolina Teachers' Assembly 
are now held regularly in Raleigh on the Wednesday, Thursday, and 
Friday of Thanksgiving Day week, and are the occasion of great 
gatherings of the teachers of the State. Among these teachers are 
always a number of St. Mary's girls, whose coming adds to the pleas- 
ure of the school life. 

A feature of the Assembly which was more emphasized this year 
than heretofore was the "Get-Together Dinners" of the alumnae of 
the State colleges present among the visitors, with a view to reviving 
and strengthening their college ties. Many of the more important 
of the State colleges held these dinners at the late Assembly, and they 
proved very enjoyable and stimulating. 

The St. Mary's gathering was very informal but was much enjoyed 
by those present, and was a good beginning for similar occasions in 
future years. A special table, specially decorated, was set apart for 
the guests in the School Dining Room, where, in the absence of the 
Rector, who was kept by a previous prior engagement from being 
present, they were welcomed by Miss Thomas and Mr. Cruikshank, 
and had dinner with the School. At the conclusion of the meal, the 
guests remained after the departure of the girls, and all present had 
the opportunity of expressing themselves. Miss Thomas made a 
delightful brief talk on the duty of St. Mary's girls as teachers and 
the relation of the Assembly gathering to the School, and further 
remarks were made by Miss Nannie Lee, Miss Katharine Bourne, 
and Mr. Cruikshank. The alumnae present included Misses Kath- 
erine Bourne and Elizabeth Lay of the Vultare School, Misses Carol 
Collier and Lizzie Lee of the Durham Schools, Miss Annie Cameron 



82 The St. Mary's Muse 



of the Hillsboro Schools, Miss Fannie Stallings of the Broadway 
School, Miss Nannie Lee of the Raleigh Schools, Miss Frances Geit- 
ner of Hickory, and Miss Frances Bottum of St. Mary's. 

Miss Martha A. Dowd, Director of Music at St. Mary's, was Presi- 
dent of the Music Teachers' Section of the Assembly the past year 
and presided over its sessions at the recent meeting, and she, Mr. 
Owen, Miss Shields, and Miss Roberts, of the St. Mary's Faculty, 
all had important parts in the deliberations. Miss Dowd's successor 
as President for the coming year is Miss Chelian H. Pixley, Director 
of Music at Fassifern, Hendersonville, who went some years ago from 
the St. Mary's Faculty to Fassifern, and who was Miss Dowd's guest 
during the Assembly. 



The Founders' Day Meetings of 1916 

There was no concerted effort made this year to bring about the 
celebration of Founders' Day on All Saints, November 1st, by the 
Alumnse Chapters, but the day was fittingly celebrated by the Chap- 
ters in a numbers of places, and where there were no Chapter meet- 
ings the thought of St. Mary's and of the anniversary here doubtless 
mingled in the minds of the Alumnse with the memories suggested 
by All Saints. Reports from several of the Chapters have been for- 
warded to the Muse and are here given : 

Raleigh Chapter 

Miss Sallie Dortch Chairman 

Miss Lula T. Btjsbee Secretary 

The usual fall Founders' Day meeting of the Raleigh Alumnse was 
held on Saturday, November 4th. 

The meeting was presided over by Miss Dortch, the Chairman, and 
Miss Janet Glenn of the St. Mary's Faculty gave a very interesting 
talk on Life in Spain. Miss Rebe Shields, of the Piano Faculty, 
gave a piano selection, and Miss Marion Thompson of the Voice 
Department sang two selections. 

Falling so soon after the Raleigh campaign for the Endowment 
Fund, in which the members of the Chapter had taken an active 



The St. Mary's Muse 83 



part and shown much interest, the meeting consisted largely of brief 
discussions and interchange of views. 

Preliminary to the Raleigh campaign the Chapter held several 
special meetings, and by individual contribution raised almost $100 
to cover the expense of the Alumnae luncheons which were given daily 
for the campaign workers during the campaign. 

Asheville Chapter 

Mrs. Carrie Carr Mitchell Chairman 

Miss Mary W. Ptjlliam < Secretary 

Twelve of the St. Mary's Alumnae were present at the Founders' 
Day Meeting of the McNeely DuBose Chapter, Asheville, held at 
the home of its President, Mrs. Carrie Carr Mitchell, on All Saints 
Day, 1916. 

The interest of the meeting centered in the several articles read 

by Miss Grace Jones from late numbers of the Muse, beginning with 

f the annual message of the Rector. All were rejoiced to learn of the 

completion of the Scholarship Fund, and are hoping for the best of 

results for the new campaign for an endowment. 

The President expressed her intention to be present at the Anni- 
versary Celebration in May. 

Feeling confident that the great majority of our numbers, following 
the ideals set before them by the beloved Alma Mater, have tried and 
are trying to do their duty in the quiet places of life, we can all be 
proud of those to whom larger tasks are given, and honor them in their 
brave fulfillment of them. Mary W. Pulliam, Sec. 

Asheville, 1ST. C, November 6, 1916. 

Hillsboro Chapter 

Mrs. J. C. Webb . . . ., Chairman 

Miss Annie Cameron Secretary 

On Wednesday afternoon, November 1st, the Hillsboro Chapter 
of the St. Mary's Alumnse held their regular Founders' Day meeting 
at the home of Miss Sue Hayes. Following the opening prayers, 
Mrs. W. L. Wall read Mr. Osborne's letter from the October, 1916, 



84 The St. Mary's Muse 



Muse, and later Miss Lillie Hamilton read selections from the Vaca- 
tion Number of the Muse. Much interest was manifested in the 
campaign for the endowment, and each one declared herself ready 
to do her part towards accomplishing the great end. Much interest 
was also shown in the proper celebration of Alumnse Day, 1917, and 
many expressed their intention of being present at St. Mary's on that 
day. It was decided that all Alumnse news was to be reported to the 
Secretary to be sent to the Muse. The meeting closed with the sing- 
ing of "Alma Mater." 

Those present were: Miss Lillie Hamilton, Mrs. W. L. Wall, 
Miss Henrietta Collins, Miss Sue Hayes, Miss Sue Eosemond, Miss 
Rebecca Wall, and Miss Annie Cameron. 

Charlotte Chapter 

Mrs. W. W. Robaeds Chairman 

Miss Arabelle T. Thomas Secretary 

The Founders' Day meeting of the Charlotte Alumnse was held 
at the home of Mrs. Eobards on All Saints' Day. There were 
eighteen members present and the meeting was a very pleasant one. 
Mrs. Eobards (Sadie Smedes Eoot) was again elected Chairman, 
Mrs. Jos. E. Eoss (Mary Warren Cameron), Vice-Chairman, and 
Miss Arabelle Thomas, Secretary-Treasurer. 

Tea and sandwiches were served and those present enjoyed a social 
meeting, with much talk and many reminiscences of St. Mary's. 

It is hoped to have a banquet of the Chapter on or about the 12th 
of May, Alumnse Day, and plans for this will be worked out during 
the winter. 



Alumnae Weddings 

Buchanan-Douglass. On Sunday, October 15th, at Raleigh, Miss Nelly- 
Marguerite Douglass (S. Mi. S., 1912-14) and Dr. Luther Thomas Buchanan. 

Spingler-Stein. On Monday, October 18th, at Raleigh, Miss Bertha Stein, 
'96, and Dr. A. G. Spingler. 

King-Roberts. On Monday, October 18th, at Raleigh, Miss Emma Street 
Roberts (S. M. S., 1904-05) and Mr. Thomas White King. 

'Calder-'Prince. On Wednesday, November 8th, at St. James' Church, Wil- 
mington, N. C, Miss Sue Brent Prince, '07, and Mr. Robert Edward Calder. 



The St. Mary's Muse 85 



I Foreman-Rodney. On Wednesday, November 15th, at Laurel, Delaware, 
Miss Eva Blanche Rodney (S. M. S., 1913-14) and Mr. Harold Clay Foreman. 
At home, Elizabeth City, N. C. 
\ Everett-Lockhart. On Wednesday, November 15th, at Calvary Church, 
i Wadesboro, Miss Caroline Ashe Lockhart, '12, and Mr. William Nash Everett, 
| Jr. At home, Wadesboro, N. C. 

Culbertson-Duncan. On Thursday, November 16th, at Old Point, Va., Miss 
Mary Duncan (S. M. S., 1913-14), of Gloucester County, Virginia, and Mr. 
1 Alexander Culbertson. At home, Miami, Fla. 

j Shore-Makely. On, Thursday, November 16th, at Edenton, N. C, Mrs. 
Llewella Makely Hogan (S. M. S., 1890-91) and Mr. Thomas Eugene Shore. 

Williams-Savage. On Thursday, November 16th, at Cape Charles, Va., 
Miss Sallie Custis Savage (S. M. S., 1911-12) and Mr. Aubrey Lee Williams. 
At home, Cape Charles, Va. 

McDonald-Budge. On Thursday, November 16th, at St. Gabriel's Church, 
Titusville, Fla., Miss Dorothy Budge (S. M. S., 1911-14) and Mr. Francis 
Hillyer McDonald. At home, Tifton, Ga. 

Glenn-Erwin. On Saturday, November 18th, at St. Philip's Church, Dur- 
ham, N. C, Miss Margaret Locke Erwin (S. M. S., 1907-12) and Mr. James 
Walter Glenn. At home, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Eorn-Woodruff. On Tuesday, November 21st, at Summerville, S. C, Miss 
Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff, 12, and Mr. Carl Andreas Korn. At home, Cape 
Charles, Va. 

Moore-Kidder. On Wednesday, November 22nd., at Wilmington, N. C, 
Miss Florence Hill Kidder (S. M. S., 1903-05) and Mr. Louis Toomer Moore. 

Sutherland-Green. On Wednesday, November 22nd, at St. James' Church, 
Wilmington, N. C, Miss Mary Owen Green (S. M. S., 1909-10) and Mr. 
William Owen Shepherd Sutherland. 

Hudson-Winslow. On Wednesday, November 22nd, at Holy Trinity 
Church, Hertford, N. C, Miss Kate Leigh Winslow (S. M. S., 1903-05) and 
Mr. William Henry Hudson. At home, Beaufort, N. C. 

White-Rawlings. On Thursday, November 23rd, at St. Timothy's Church, 
Wilson, N. O, Miss Susan Porter Rawlings (1909-13) and Mr. William An- 
thony White. At home, Duke, N. C. 

Lee-Peace. On Wednesday, November 15th, at Watha, N. C, Miss Bessie 
Fitzhugh Peace (S. M. S., 1909-12) and Mr. Fitzhugh Lee. 

Gregory-Duncan. On Tuesday, November 21, at Christ Church, Raleigh, 
N. C, Miss Annie Badger Duncan (1898-1900) of Raleigh, and Rev. Henry 
Claiborne Gregory of Roanoke, Va. 

Dearing-Lynah. On Tuesday, November 28th, at Savannah, Ga., Miss 
Lillie Heyward Lynah (S. M. S., 1903-4) and Mr. Harry Timrod Dearing. 

Holland-Griffith. On Wednesday, December 6th, at Thomasville, N. C, Miss 
Perry Leigh Griffith (S. M. S., 1905-06) and Mr. Sam Noland Holland, Jr. 
At home, Raleigh, N. C. 

Moore-Carter. On Thursday, December 28th, at St. Peter's Church, Wash- 



86 The St. Mary's Muse 



ington, N. C, Miss Margaret Robena Carter (S. M. S., 1914-15) and Mr. 
Charles Joyce Moore. 

Carr-Winston. On Saturday, December 30th at Christ Church, Raleigh, 
N. C, Miss Amy Winston, '12, and Mr. George Watts Carr. At home, 901 
Duke Street, Durham, N. C. 

Gaul-Small. On Wednesday, January 3rd, at St. Peter's Church, Wash- 
ington, N. C, Miss Katharine Sanderson Small (S. M. S., 1909-11) and Dr. 
John Stuart Gaul. 

f 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 

206-10 MASONIC TEMPLE 



Success in the Campaign for the Raising of the $250,000 
Fund to pay off the debt and provide additional new build- 
ings, and the beginning of an Endowment Fund is of the 
utmost importance to St. Mary's. 

Think of it, talk of it,- and help in every way you can. 



M. Rosenthal 


"You get them when promised" 


& Co. 


liortoh s Studio 


GROCERS 


Masonic Temple 


WILMINGTON and HARGETT STS. 


"Workers in Artistic Photography" 



Advertisements 



St. Mary's Girls Always Welcome at 

Hudson-Belk Company 

Full line of Ready-to-wear, Hosiery, Gloves, Furnishings, Dry 
Goods, Shoes, Toilet Goods, Ribbons and Laces 



ESTABLISHED 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

JONES & BLAND 

PURE FOOD STORE 
Phones 667 and 668 Raleigh, N. C. 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 
AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Cor. Fayetteville and Hargett Sts. 



THOMAS A PARTIN COMPANY 

Raleish, N. C. 
Specialty of Ladies' Ready-to-Wear Gar- 
ments and Gossard's Lace Front Corsets 



THE SCHOOL AUTHORITIES 

are at all times pleased to send full information 
about St. Mary's on request without charge. 
We should like every one interested to have at 
least copies of 

The Illustrated Catalogue, 

The Books of Views, 

The Song Book. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



BOYLAK-PEARGE 

COMPANY 

The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 



Advertisements 



Stationery, College Linen, Pennants, 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 

ell Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. C. 


GAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 
Power 

1377— BOTH PHONES— 1377 


JOHNSON & BROUGHTON 
Good Things to Eat 

122 FAYBTTEVILLE STREET 


WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

Coal, Wood, Ice, Brick 
22 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. 0. 


S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 0. 


H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

oses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

loral Designs, Palms, Perns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 


Wm. Heller 

THE FOOTERY SHOP 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THE ALUMNA ARE REMINDED 
that a complete Alumnw Register, which should include 
information about all past students of St. Mary's, is 
now in course of preparation for publication. 

Information for this Register is solicited. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 

Safe, Secure, and Successful 

HAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

R. S. BUSBEE, Secretary 

Insure Against Loss by Fire 

est Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

The Mechanics Savings Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 



A Pafe which invites tho patronage of 
ladies. The grirls of St. Mary's will enjoy 
the beauty and convenience of our modern, 
well-appointed dining: place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 



Thcmas H. Briggs & Sons 

Raleigh, N.C. 

THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 

GOLF, TENNIS, AND SPORTING GOODS 

MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
104 EAST HARGETT ST. Bell Phone 719 



Advertisements 


HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 

THE WAKE DRUG STORE 

Phones 228 


HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 


Thomas H. Briggs & Sons Base Balls > Basket Balls 

The Big Hardware Men Raleigh, N. C. Tennis and Sporting Good 


Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 


Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFEI 
Phone 529 


PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 
12 W. Hargett St. 


DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 


RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 


T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 


Subscriptions for the monthly Muse are very acceptable 
at all times. One dollar will bring the ten copies of the 
Muse published next after its receipt. 


PERRY'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington St. 


MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 
VISITING CARDS 

CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY ENGRAVED 

Send for samples and prices 

Edwards&Broughfon Printing 

Company 

Steel Die and Copper Plate Eugrayers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


California Fruit Store. 111 Fayetteville St.. Raleigh 

Fancy fruits and pure ice cream. Best equipped and most 
Sunitary ice cream factory in the state. Our cream is the 
"Quality Kind." Send us your orders. California Fruit 
store. 111 Fayetteville St., Vurnakes & Co., Props.. Raleigh. 


Ladies'and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishment 

UABUWJiLL 6o O'KfcXLY, i J RUf'RIJiTUliS 

204 S. Salisbury St. 


HAYES & HALL— STUDIO 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY 

J. L, O'Ouinn & Co. 

Florists 


L. SCHWARTZ 
f RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 



Advertisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 



Raleigh's Leading and Largest Hotel 



tinners and Banquets a Specialty 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Co., Proprietors 



>lly & W/nne Jewelr/ Cq. 



COLLEGE 
JEWELRY 



28 Payetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



WATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. 
[Picture Frames and Window Shades. 



SHOES! WHOSE? 

BERNARD L, CROCKER 

124 Payetteville Street 

RIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 



YOUNG & HUGHES 



Plumbers 

Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 



S. Wilmington Street 



C. D. ARTHUR City Market 
FISH AND OYSTERS 

ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
College Pennants, Pillows, Pictures, 
Frames, Novelties 

EOYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 
Made Fresh Every Day 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tick- 
ets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, as well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
trip to any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. They will 
gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the 
cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you 



H. F. GARY, General Pass. Agent, 
j| Washington, D. C. 



J. 0. JONES, Traveling Pass. Agent, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

November-December, 1916 

November 1, Wednesday: All Saints': Founders' Day. 

November 4, Saturday: Interclass Parties. 8.30 p. m. Senior-Sophomore; 

Junior-Freshman. 
November 10, Friday: Peace-St. Mary's Concert Series. 8.30 p. m. Tollefsen 

Trio. 
November 18, Saturday: Muse Club Circus. Gymnasium. 8.15 p. m. 

November 20, Monday: Faculty Recital. Auditorium. 8.30 p. m. 

November 30, Thursday: Thanksgiving Day. Holiday. 

December 9, Saturday: School Bazaar for Eelgian Relief Fund. 

December 16, Saturday: Opera — "Patience." Direction of Mr. Owen. Au- 
ditorium. 8.30. 

December 20, Wednesday: Kindersymphonie. Direction of Miss Dowd. 
Auditorium. 7.30 p. m. 
Christmas Tree. Gymnasium. 8.15 p. m. 

December 21, Thursday, 3.00 p. m. — Jan. 9, Tuesday, 7.00 p. m, Christmas 
Holiday. 



orfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "MGHT EXPRESS" 

Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 

NORFOLK G s£ils 

Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 

Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule, Best Service Double Daily Express Service 

H. S. LEARD, G. P. A. J. F. MITCHELL, T. P. A. 

Norfolk, Va. Raleigh, N. C, 



Location Central for the Carolina.?. 

Climate Healthy and Salnhrious. 

St. Mary's School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

75th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 15, 1916. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25, 1917 






1. THE COLLEGE 

2. THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
St. Mary's \ ^ THE ART DEPARTMENT 

offers 
instruction < h. THE ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 

in these ] 5> THE HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 
Departments I 

6. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL 

7. THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 

In 1916-17 are enrolled 275 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members* of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 
Thirty-six Pianos. Neiv Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 
Dormitories. 
Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education icithout 
slight to the Sclwlastic training. 
For catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George ^Y. Lay, D. C. L., 

Rector. 

(DWARDS » BROUGHTON PRINTING CO., RALEIGH N. C. 



Wat 
&t Jfflarp'* jfWusfe 

ftaletgf), M. C. 



£ate OTtnter dumber 

Spril, 1917 



The St. Mary's Muse 

LATE WINTER NUMBER 
Vol. XXI April, 1917 No. 4 

The Seasons 

Annie S. Cameron, '16. 

Wake, Field, and wake, Forest 
For Spring is returning. 
Put on your green robes 
And appear at the dance; 
Our champion, the sun, 
The cold snow is burning; 
It melts from before him 
At each ardent glance. 

Wake, Field, and wake, Forest! 
For Summer is coming. 
Oh, darken your green leaves 
And put forth your shade. 
The wild bee has come — 
List his musical humming 
As he flits o'er the flowers 
Of meadow and glade. 

Rest, Field, and rest, Forest! 
For Autumn is calling. 
Oh, doff your gay robes 
And prepare for your sleep. 
Swift from your branches 
The bright leaves are falling; 
Soon they'll be wrapt 
In a white winding-sheet. 

Sleep, Field, and sleep, Forest! 
'Till Spring shall release you 
From Winter's cold bonds 
And his chill, icy chain, 
When, with gay flowers blooming 
And sweet song-birds singing, 
You in your beauty 
Shall dance once again. 



88 The St. Mary's Muse 



Story-Telling Time 

Aline Hughes, '18. 

"Story Telling Time!" What a picture it brings to the mind, a 
picture that never quite fades from those who have enjoyed that magic 
hour. Always there is a great glowing fire, the only light in the cozy 
room at twilight. There is a whistling, howling wind outside, tossing 
the autumn leaves, or, perhaps, whirling the drifted snow. But in- 
side, safe from the cutting wind and cold, a cheerful, happy group is 
gathered about the fire. Seated on the rug and about the hearth are 
several girls and boys, whose faces in the firelight show an intent in- 
terest in the stories which mother is telling. Ah ! how well she knows 
each member of the little group ! So well, indeed, that little Billy's 
mind is full of talking animals, gnomes, and elves, while Alice, gazing 
dreamily into the fire, sees fairy princesses and brave knights, and 
Jack finds a subtly pointed moral in the strong giant who mingles 
kindness and gentleness with rude strength. And all the time Baby 
Dot on her mother's lap laughs and coos, and thinks the stories are 
all for her. 

But story-telling time is almost over, and we must run away before 
the lights are on, for we would not have the vision dispelled by the 
ordinary light of things. Only in the firelight glow is there the proper 
magic for story telling, and those of us who have yielded to this magic 
will always feel its potency in our hearts and carry there a memory. 



When Your Grandma Was a Little Bit of a Girl 

Nina Burke, '19. 

Mammy leaned over the bed and tucked in the cover, thinking little 
Marjy was asleep, but the minute her hand had touched the cover, 
Marjy's blue eyes popped open and a very wide-awake voice threat- 
ened, "Mammy, if you don't tell me a story right now, I'll stay wide 
awake all night long I" 

"Now, Miss Marjy, hon', don't you knows dat you'se gittin' too old 
to have f olkses tell you stories 'fore you'll go to sleep ebery night ?" 



The St. Mary's Muse 89 

"Yes-es-es, I guess I am too old; but, Mammy, tell me — just to- 
night," the coaxing voice pleaded. 

"Well, I guess I will — just tonight. What shall I tell you 'bout? 
Wants to know about Mr. Redbreast en Miss Wren, or 'bout de little 
foxies dat lib in de midst of de woods, or a story 'bout whin your 
grandma was a little bit of a girl V 

"Oh, tell me a story about grandmother when she was a little bit of 
a girl !" 

"Well, honey," she began, "ye know dat way back in de good old 
days whin all us niggers was owned by de white folkses, eviry time a 
little baby was born, one of lis black niggers was giben to dem. Whin 
your grandma, Miss Peggy, was born, I was giben to her for ver virry 
own. Well, one evening whin she was 'bout ten years old, she'n me 
come into de house 'bout dark from playing in de woods back of de 
quarters. Miss Sallie, her ma, met us at de doah en said: 'Peggy, 
darlin,' your father tol' me to kiss you good-bye en tell you to be a 
brave girl en he would be back home soon from de war/ 

"Well, dat was de beginnin' of de" longes' en de hardes' years I 
nab evir known. All de men folkses, evin de niggers, had to go off to 
de war, leabing poah Miss Sallie to do everything. Den the Southern 
army started sinding all dere wounded men to our house 'kase it was 
big en could be used as a horspital, and dat gave Miss Sallie and de 
niggers mor' en mor' to do. 

"One night it was rainin' en cold outside en Miss Peggy en me was 
settin' on de flo' by de fiah talkin' 'bout ghostes en spooks whin we 
heard somebody come stampin' up on de gallery and gib a big knock 
at de doah." 

Marjy sat up in bed at this point of the story, her eyes big as sau- 
cers. "Go on, Mammy; go on." 

"Well, Miss Sallie and Martha was upstairs tindin' to a mighty 
sick solger, en all de other niggers had gone down to de quarters 'bout 
half a mile away, so de only person to go to de doah was me. Well, 
Miss Peggy and me got up and walked into de hall, quakin' in our 
shoes at de thought of what might be on de other side of dat doah. 
Whin I finally managed to open it — it was mighty heaby — we saw a 



90 The St. Maky's Muse 

poah tired solger who axed us whar de mistress of de house was. We 
tolt whar she was, en he said, 'Dis note hab got to be taken to Colonel 
Dodge, who is over on de other side of de woods dar 'bout three miles. 
Couldn't you sind somebody with it % It just must git dar !' Miss 
Peggy, she looked at me, en me, I looked at Miss Peggy, en den I saw 
Miss Peggy's head go up and she said : 'If you'll trust me wid your 
message, I'll see that it gits dar right away.' The solger gabe Miss 
Peggy the message and turned and walked down de steps. Miss 
Peggy turned to me and said : 'Dinah, run as fast as you know how 
to de stable en put a bridle on old Star, and whin you bring her 'round 
to de front I'll be waitin' for you.' Well, Miss Marjy, I was so scared 
that I just didn't know what to do, but anything that Miss Peggy said 
went with me, so I hurried out to the stable. It was so pitch-black in 
dat stable that I could hardly find whar Star was, but at las' I got de 
bridle on en led her 'round to de house. Miss Peggy was standing on 
de gallery wid her ma. Miss Sallie kissed her good-bye and buttoned 
her coat on and thin we rode away. I tell you, Miss Marjy, I ain't 
ever been as scared in all my born days ; but Miss Peggy, well, I don't 
believe anything could scare her. The road went right thru de woods, 
and it was black dark in dere, too. I don't know how we eber got to 
de place whar de solgers was, but whin we did, I was jess nacherly so 
tuckered out dat I couldn't talk. Miss Peggy told me afterwards dat 
ma eyes were jes' rolling 'roun' in ma haid. Colonel Dodge was jes' 
so proud of Miss Peggy for being so brave dat he didn't know what to 
do, and whin it was time for us to go home, he saunt two solgers wid 
us. After dat ebery time de solgers passed by they always stopped 
to talk to Miss Peggy ; en dats de ind of ma story, so lay down agin en 
go to sleep." 

Mammy tucked Marjy in again, and for the second time Marjy's 
eyes popped open and she said in a very sleepy voice, "Mammy, wasn't 
grandmother grand ?" 

"Dat she shurely was, honey. ISTow, shet your eyes, en Mammy'll 
sing to you." 

The eyes obediently closed and Mammy started crooning in her soft 
voice : 



The St. Mary's Muse 91 

"Ah been working on de levee 
All de live-long day," 

And before the second verse was over Marjy was fast asleep, dreaming 
of Grandmother Peggy, I guess. 



The Solving of the Mystery 

Josie Weight 

I stood hesitating behind the thick curtains which screened the win- 
dow by which I had entered this room of mystery. The wind whis- 
tled weirdly outside and the rain splashed dismally against the win- 
t dow panes. A dog howled in the distance. All this was borne upon 
! my mind unconsciously, as I was intent upon observing the room 

5 which I had just entered. 

b At first the room seemed to be unoccupied. Each window was hung 

6 with a curtain similar to the one behind which I crouched ; the walls 
f bristled with relics of all kinds: Indian bows, arrows, deer antlers, 
I swords, and every conceivable kind of curiosity. A large fireplace 
t| occupied one end of the room and a small coal fire darted fitful gleams 
] upon the furniture, which gave it at once a ghostly appearance. In 
J front of the fire was a large chair, and in this sat a man of perhaps 

sixty years or more ; his head reclined upon the back of the chair and 
his eyes closed as if in slumber. 

"So," I thought, "this is the room from which so many priceless 
jewels have disappeared and which I, Reuben O'Brian, have been 
sent from Scotland Yard to investigate." 

I at once knew the occupant of the room to be no other than Mr. 
Martin Marlow, a wealthy broker from whom each night for a week 
now some invaluable piece of jewelry had been taken. The mystery 
of it was that only one piece at a time had disappeared. Mr. Marlow 
declared that he himself had slept in the room each night after discov- 
ering the disappearance of the first piece. I suddenly started as Mr. 
Marlow arose to his feet and with a staggering motion began to come 
straight to the curtain behind which I was concealed. On his nearer 
approach I perceived that he was walking in his sleep ; his eyes were 



92 The St. Maey's Muse 

wide open, with a glassy stare ; he closed and unclosed his hands spas- 
modically and his lips moved up and down, showing a row of gold 
teeth as he muttered to himself. Within three feet of my hiding place 
he stopped and, pressing a spring in the wall, a secret safe was re- 
vealed, from which he took a rope of priceless pearls. Closing the 
safe, he glided swiftly to the fireplace, above which hung a gold- 
headed cane, evidently a relic of some long dead ancestor. With a 
swift motion he secured this and wrenching off the top, thrust the 
pearls into the opening which was revealed. Returning the cane to its 
original place on the wall, he went back to his chair and sank back 
in peaceful slumber. 

My feelings were of great astonishment that the mystery had been 
solved so easily, and I climbed swiftly out of the window and made my 
way back to Scotland Yard, happy in the knowledge of giving my 
chief a satisfactory report. 



SCHOOL NEWS— CHRISTMAS TO LENT 



Following a fall marked by a number of pleasant entertainments, 
the pre-Christmas season came to a climax as usual this year with the 
operetta and the Christmas tree evening. Every one went home in 
proper spirit to enjoy to the full the fortnight holiday, the fulfillment 
of which was almost if not quite up to the anticipation of it. 

School duties were suspended December 21st for the holidays and 
were resumed Tuesday, January 9th, and the pre-examination and 
pre-Lenten seasons were more than full of special occasions. This 
period passed off happily, unmarked by any serious sickness, and ex- 
aminations caused hardly a stir. The annual play of the Dramatic 
Club, usually given just before Christmas, the visit of the University 
Dramatic Club, likewise postponed over the holidays, and the visit of 
the University Glee Club were the special bright spots shortly before 
the Lenten season. 

Those who have enjoyed the similar events of the School life of 
past years will live over some of them in seeing here the lengthier 
accounts of the individual events. 



The St. Mart's Muse 93 

The Opera — "Patience" 

The annual appearance of the Chorus Class under the direction of 
Mr. R. Blinn Owen has come to be looked forward to as one of the 
most enjoyable events of the school year. Mr. Owen has given in 
the last few years a succession of the famous Gilbert and Sullivan 
operas, which since their first presentation in the early '80s have been 
among the most popular of the English comic operas, and the enjoy- 
ment with which they have been received by St. Mary's audiences has 
shown that the appreciation of them here is not less than that univer- 
sally felt wherever they have been given. 

In 1914 Mr. Owen gave the less well known "Trial by Jury." In 
1915 the offering was the "Mikado," and this year's opera was "Pa- 
tience" or "The Bride of Bunthorne," given in the Auditorium on 
December 16th. 

The opera "Patience" is in two acts, having the same scene, "a 
glade," and the stage setting was, as usual, very effective — the trees, 
bright-leaved plants, and flowers of red and white adding special 
touches to what has always been one of the very attractive parts of Mr. 
Owen's entertainments. Miss Martha Roberts assisted Mr. Owen, 
and the accompaniments were played by an orchestra with Miss Rob- 
erts at the piano. The News and Observer spoke the next morning of 
the performance as follows : 

The opera, a delightfully amusing satire on estheticism, was given with a 

: spirit and life unusual in amateur performances. The four-part chorus at the 

i close of Act I, "Oh, List While We Our Love Confess," with the reply from 

i the soldiers, "My Jealousy I Can't Express," was remarkably well done, and 

t the ensemble was most effective. Equally good was the final chorus when 

j I the curtain went down amid hearty and prolonged applause. The lack of 

i strain and the ease with which the solos were sung added much to the pleas- 

t ure of the listeners. Misses Martha Wright, Ella Pender, and Ruby Thorn 

i not only sang excellently, but acted their parts with genuine dramatic ability; 

1 Miss Anita Smith sang with clear enunciation, her voice being well suited to 

the part of idyllic poet, and Misses Audrey Stone and Mary Neal were the 

solo singers of the Dragoon Guard Chorus and did their parts as soloists and 

as leaders with vim and well-marked rhythm, as well as volume of sound. 

The staging was really beautiful, with the brightly colored and contrasting 
costumes of the maidens in Greek dress with gilded lyres or cymbals and 
those of the military men. 



94 The St. Mary's Muse 



Between the acts were given with grace two charming esthetic dances. 
The dancers were members of the esthetic dancing class of Miss Mabel Bar- 
ton, the Director of Physical Education. 

Mr. Owen is to be warmly congratulated both for the excellent training of 
the individual singers and the choruses and for the effective presentation of 
the opera on the stage. 

The performance of the opera was not only a great pleasure to the 
audience, but a very genuine success for Mr. Owen, and the girls who 
took part did themselves credit in every way. 

The reappearance of Miss Barton's esthetic dancers, which was a 
further reminder of the success she achieved in this direction last 
spring, was a joy in itself and a pleasant reminder of the possibility of 
further appearances through the remainder of the year. 

The full cast of the opera was as follows : 

Officers of Dragoon Guards: 

Colonel Calverley Miss Mary Neal 

Major Murgatroyd Miss Sara Rawlings 

Lieut. Duke of Dunstable Miss Audrey Stone 

Reginald Bunthorne (a fleshly poet) Miss Martha Wright 

Archibald Grosvenor (an idyllic poet) Miss Anita Smith 

Rapturous Maidens: 

The Lady Angela Miss Mamie Holt 

The Lady Saphir Miss Aline Hughes 

The Lady Ella Miss Helen McNeill 

The Lady Jane Miss Ruby Thorn 

Patience (o dairy maid) Miss Ella Pender 

Twenty Love-sick Maidens: 

Misses Mary Lindsay, Dorothy Wood, Virginia Williams, Selma Fishel, 
Margaret Yorke, Elizabeth Wingate, Louise Walker, Marianna Stanley, 
Lucia Slade, Hattie Copeland, Lou Spencer Avent, Prances Hillman, 
Katharine Shuford, Nancy Lay, Catherine Mott, Anna Patch, Eugenia 
Griffith, Elizabeth Waddell, Mildred Collins, Margaret Marston. 

Dragoon Guards: 

Misses Louise King, Ellen Lay, Josephine Myers, Gertrude Merrimon, Florie 
Bell Morgan, Mildred Kirtland, Katherine Lefferts, Helen McCoy, Pauline 
Donlon, Virginia Pope Allen, Laura Hyman. 

Esthetic Dancing Under the Direction of Miss Mabel Barton: 

(a) Day Dreams. 

(b) Greek Ball Dance. 
Dancers : 

Misses L. Shepherd, B. Sheldon, V. Williams, A. Seed, M. Hoke, L. Dent, 
T. Foot, V. Pottle, M. Gold, E. Tredwell, M. Springs. 



The St. Mary's Muse 95 

The opera will be repeated on May 12th as one of the features of 
the Anniversary Celebration. 

Christmas Tree Evening 

This year the Christmas vacation began so close to Christmas Day 
that more than the usual amount of Christmas spirit was in the air in 
the days preceding the holidays. Christmas presents had to be made 
and Christmas buying done before we scattered to our several homes, 
if it was to be done at all, for the school work only ceased on the after- 
noon of Thursday, the 21st, just in time to make sure that even those 
most distant would be able to be home before Christmas Eve. 

The piles of cedar in the neighborhood of the Muse room gradually 
replaced by piles of finished rope, suggested the Christmas decorations 
some days before the actual looked-f or evening ; but however familiar 
we may be with what happens then, and however long we may have 
I been enjoying these Christmas tree evenings at St. Mary's on the night 
j before we go home at Christmas, they are just as pleasant in the reality 
each time when the event arrives; and so it was this year. The 
Christmas supper in the prettily decorated dining-room with the 
Christmas bells overhead and the Christmas napkins at each place and 
the little candle-decorated Christmas trees in the center of each table,, 
and the fried oysters — of course, the fried oysters — furnished the 
first thrill; then the special entertainment in the auditorium where 
Miss Dowd this year presented the children of the lower departments 
in a very effectively trained "Kinder Symphonie," and Miss Barton 
presented some of the children in further effective esthetic dancing, 
afforded the second delight, only to be followed in turn by the crown- 
ing feature, the Christmas tree itself, with the carols and the appear- 
ance of "Santa" with his bag full of "knocks." 

"Nor would the whole have been complete without the coming of the 
choristers in the early hours of next morning, when the Seniors in 
their white robes and their lighted candles made their round, as their 
sister Senior classes have done so often in the past on similar occasions. 

Possibly the most effective part of this whole Christmas observance 
is the appearance of the gymnasium just at the beginning of the 



96 The St. Maky's Muse 

Christmas tree, with the lighted candles about the walls and on the 
tree and all else darkness, and then the coming of the choristers with 
their lighted candles from West Wing, singing "It Came Upon the 
Midnight Clear." 

Mr. Owen and Miss Dowd prepared the music for the entertain- 
ment, which was simple and very effective, and Nancy Woolf ord made 
a very acceptable Santa Claus. The usual exchange of trifling re- 
membrances arranged at the tables was dispensed with this year, that 
the proceeds might be given to the Belgians, but in other respects the 
entertainment was much as heretofore, and was as fully enjoyed as 
always in the past. 

The Children's Christmas Festiyal 

The program of the Children's Festival, mentioned above, in full 

was as follows : 

I 

Toy Symphony : A Merry Sleigh Ride Chwatal 

Sleigh Virginia Lay and Martha Andrews 

Triangles Isabel Jones and Melissa Chamberlain 

Bells Lucy Lay, Janie Staudt, Charlotte Nelson and Augusta Andrews 

Castanets Alice Guirkin 

Metallaphone Roella Robbins and Margaret Yorke 

Whip Randolph Hill 

Drum Harriet Barber 

Cymbals Katherine Alston 

Tympani Katherine Hughes 

Trumpet Nancy Lay 

Comb Trumpets. .Lilias Shepherd, Mary Hoke, Elsie Freeland and Nancy Lay 

First Violin Helen Snyder and Frances Sears 

Second Violin Virginia Lassiter 

Piano Martha Wright and Dorothy Wood 

II 

Christmas Carol for Children Thayer 

Star of the East Backus 

The Star Nancy Lay 

The Child Lucy Lay 

Cradle Hymn Luther 

Singers — M. Andrews, F. Busbee, K. Raney, E. Yates, S. Denson, I. Jones, M. 
Lyon, S. Pendleton, J. Andrews, D. Howard, E. Riddick, A. Andrews, J. 
Grimes, E. Lawrence, E. Mason, M. Raney, R. Bowen, N. Hardin, S. 
Robbins, A. Boylston, P. Halstead, V. Lay, M. S. Morgan, C. Rosenthal. 



The St. Mary's Muse 97 

in 

1. Dance of Greeting. 

2. (a) Sunset Polka. 
(b) The Sylphette. 

Dancers — A. Andrews, J. Grimes, E. Lawrence, E. Mason, A. Boylston, P. 
Halstead, V. Lay, M. S. Morgan, S. Denson, I. Jones, M. Lyon, S. Pendle- 
ton, M. Raney, C. Rosenthal. 

Miss Dowd was in general charge of the arrangements and was ably 
assisted by Misses Shields, Thompson, and Barton. The children 
entered thoroughly into the spirit of the occasion and did credit to 
their training. "The Merry Sleigh Ride" gave a very realistic repre- 
sentation of old Santa Claus speeding over his snowy way. Each 
member did her part well and with credit to Miss Shields, but Vir- 
ginia Lay and Martha Andrews, who furnished the scraping sound of 
the sleigh, and Randolph Hill, the Whip, were especially good and 
prompt in their parts. Miss Shields received many compliments on 
her success. 

The participants in the carols took part with great seriousness, 
much to the enjoyment of the audience. Misses Nancy and Lucy 
Lay, who in costume sang "Star of the East," received special ap- 
plause. Misses Mary Strange Morgan and Margaret Raney were the 
special feature in the dances, and their lightness and grace merited 
special notice. 

The Christmas Holidays 

The trips to and from home were made without event and the holi- 
days proved delightful to each one wherever she happened to be. 

There was a smaller gathering than usual at the School, though even 
at that the School Family rarely fell below twenty. The only girls 
i remaining over for the holidays were Eva Peele of Williamston, who 
remained to escape the whooping cough at home; Beatrice Sheldon, 
whose home is in Rhode Island ; Margaret French of Chicago, who, 
however, spent the latter part of the holidays in Kinston with her 
St. Mary's friends, and Lucy Jensen of Asheville. Mile. Rudnicka, 
Misses Frances and Margaret Bottum, and "the Lays" and "the 
Cruikshanks" formed the rest of the School Family. 



98 The St. Mary's Muse 

Junior Basketball Game 

We got back after the holidays on Tuesday, January 9th, and were 
disappointed in not having the University Glee Club on hand on 
Saturday night, the 13th. The first student occasion after the holi- 
days was, therefore, the Junior basketball game on the afternoon of 
Monday, the 15th, in the gymnasium. 

The game was a thrilling one during the first half. The two teams 
stayed about even, the Sigmas being one point ahead with the score at 
9-8. Kern, Mu, began the second half by throwing a goal and follow- 
ing it with five more in quick succession, while the best the Sigmas 
could do was to score two, making the final score 20-13 in favor of the 
Mus. The quick play of Jensen and the goals of Kern deserve special 
mention. The line-up was as follows : 

Bigma. Mu. 

Robbins Center M. "Wilson 

Freeland Rigbt Guard Dougherty 

Lassiter Left Guard Barber 

M. Hoke Right Forward Kern 

Jensen Left Forward N. Lay 

K. D., '17. 
Lee's Birthday 

General Lee's birthday was celebrated by a half holiday with an 
inter-society meeting right after lunch. 

The meeting was presided over by Elmyra Jenkins, president of the 
E.A.P. Literary Society. After the singing of "Tenting Tonight," 
Nancy Woolford read a sketch of Lee's life, and Aline Hughes read 
"The Sword of Lee," and the meeting closed with the singing of Dixie. 

K Eose, '17. 
The Mnse Entertainment 

Saturday evening, January 19th, was characterized by one of the 
novel entertainments of the year. It was a combination of feast and 
glee club entertainment, both requiring an assault on the pocketbook 
as a part of the enjoyment. The proceeds helped decidedly towards 
the Annual Muse, while those present were loud in their praises and 
delighted to feel that they had gotten their money's worth. The re- 



The St. Mary's Muse 99 

freshments were chicken salad, sandwiches, and ice-cream. Georgia 
Foster and Frances Hillman were very effective "waiters." 

Between courses the Mandolin Club gave a number of pleasing 
selections and the singing of a very popular repertoire by Misses 
Martha Wright and Anita Smith was a feature which proved very 
enjoyable to those in attendance. 

Basketball Game 

The third game between the first teams of the Sigma and Mu Clubs 
was played in the gymnasium on January 22d. It was of course ex- 
citing, and about the closest game of the year. 

At the end of the first half the score was 12-8 in favor of the 
Sigmas ; but in the second half Brigham and McMullan played so well 
together that they made goals almost every minute, making the score 
at the end of the game 16-12 in favor of the Mus. 

The lineup was as follows : 

Sigma. Mu. 

Ravenel Center E. Lay 

Robinson Right Guard Burke 

1 Chavasse Left Guard Glass 

Woolf ord Right Forward Brigham 

Waddell Left Forward McMullan 

K. D., '17. 
The Paderewski Concert 

This was legislative year in Raleigh, and the assembling of the 
legislators during the winter months always means more and better 
attractions at the theaters. Partly for this and partly for other rea- 
sons we have been especially fortunate in our musical and theatrical 
opportunities during this season. 

In addition to our three Peace-St. Mary's Concerts, all three of 
which were very good, the St. Mary's girls have had the opportunity 
this year of hearing some of the most famous of the world's musicians 
as well as of seeing Maud Adams in the "Little Minister." Before 
the holidays the Russian Orchestra appeared at the City Auditorium, 
and since Christmas there have been the Paderewski and Maud Powell 



100 The St. Mary's Muse 

Concerts, both of which were enjoyed by a large part of the girls and 
faculty. 

Of course, the Paderewski Concert on the evening of January 25th 
thrilled all the audience, and the St. Mary's part of it not least. 

Inter-Class Parties 

The return Class Parties were given on January 27th and proved 
very happy occasions. 

The Sophomore Senior Party 

The Seniors were greatly entertained by the party given them by 
the Sophomores on the evening of January 27th in the Muse Room. 
The chief amusement was a picture contest. The classes were coupled 
off, each partner having to draw a picture of the other. The first 
prize was given to Ellen Lay for the best drawing, which was a por- 
trait of Ruth Gebert, and the second prize to Annie Robinson for the 
largest number of correct guesses. The refreshments of apple salad 
and punch were greatly enjoyed by all. A. C. L., '17. 

The Freshman-Junior Party 

We may be only Freshmen, 

And not long away from home, 
But we ask you, honored Juniors, 

To a party — won't you come? 
We'll do our best to please you 

And drive away dull care. 
So put on your best "bib and tucker," 

And on Saturday be there! 

This was the invitation which the Freshmen posted on the bulletin 
board for Saturday morning, January 27th, and every time a Junior 
passed by she became gladder and gladder that she was a Junior. 

At 8 o'clock the upper classmen, dressed in their "best bibs and 
tuckers," assembled in the Parlor, where they were welcomed by their 
sister class. Lively games were played by both girls and teachers, 
and the entertainment went off with much "pep." 

Exams were over, and it was good to be at the party. 

Then when the Ereshmen decided that their friends had played 



The St. Mary's Muse 101 

long enough, they called a halt to the games and served delicious ice- 
cream and cake, with an attractive favor on each plate. 

The 9 :30 bell rang all too soon and the Juniors agreed that although 
their hostesses were "only Freshmen and far away from home," they 
certainly knew how to give mighty nice parties. K. D., '18. 

The Mid-Tear Dance in the Parlor 

With mid-year examinations over — the last of them was safely 
finished on Saturday, January 27th — every one felt freer and it 
was good to usher in the work of the second half-year with a free 
Monday evening which was graciously given by the Rector and Lady 
Principal on the 29th. Part of the girls under the chaperonage of 
Miss Barton attended the basketball game at the City Auditorium and 
the rest spent the evening in informal dancing in the Parlor, where 
light refreshments were served. 

The University Dramatic Clnb 

On the evening of Saturday, February 3d, the University of North 
Carolina Dramatic Club made their annual visit to St. Mary's and 
were welcomed as heartily as always. 

Following the theatrical vogue of the present season, this year's 
program, in the manner of the Neighborhood Players, consisted of 
three short playlets instead of one long play. Without question, the 
playlets required more talent in their interpretation and the attempt 
was a more ambitious one than in former years, and did credit to the 
club, but the result was not altogether a happy one. 

In the first playlet, a one-act comedy, "Old Cronies," Mr. George 
Wimberly as "Dr. Jacks" and Mr. George Green as "Captain Pigeon" 
comprised the cast. Both of them, and especially Mr. Wimberly, 
made decided hits at St. Mary's last year and won added credit this 
season. "Old Cronies" was an excellent starter for the evening. 

But the second playlet, Lord Dunsany's one-act play, "The Glitter- 
ing Gate," the ambitious offering of the Washington Square Players 
in their first production, was far from a fit for the audience here and 
made us wonder whether it would fit any better in the other places in 



102 The St. Maky's Muse 

which the Club will appear. Mr. Roland McClamroch and Mr. A. S. 
Chase took the parts and did themselves credit, but the play missed. 

The third play, Mr. William C. DeMille's mock tragedy, "Food," 
brought forth many laughs and closed the evening successfully. Mr. 
J. Y. Jordan and Mr. R. L. Johnston took the male parts, while Mr. 
B. Lacey Meredith was "Irene," and as such had the part in which 
the girls are always interested. 

We missed Mr. Bruce Webb from the part of the leading lady, and 
Mr. Coggins, whom we especially remember as the "Chocolate Sol- 
dier," and were glad to see the latter in the audience. 

The evening was altogether an enjoyable one and the program very 
creditable, but we cannot help hoping that when the Club next visits 
St. Mary's it will bring with it something more like "What Happened 
to Jones" or "The Chocolate Soldier." 

The Faculty Reception to Mrs. Bickett 

The Hon. Thomas W. Bickett of Louisburg was inaugurated in 
January as Governor of North Carolina, and from that date Raleigh 
society "did itself proud" in doing honor to Mrs. Bickett, now taking 
up her life in Raleigh as the first lady of the State. Of course, St. 
Mary's felt a special interest in all the honor done Mrs. Bickett, who,, 
as "Fannie Yarboro" of Louisburg, was a "St. Mary's girl" and grad- 
uated with first honors from St. Mary's in the Class of '89. 

On Wednesday, February 7th, the ladies of St. Mary's — Mrs. Lay 
and the ladies of the Faculty — were at home in the School Parlor in 
Mrs. Bickett's honor. The girls were first introduced and in the 
later hours of the reception about a hundred visitors from the city, 
alumnae and friends of the School, called. 

Refreshments were served by a number of the girls — Alice Latham, 
Eleanor Relyea, Frances Cheatham, Louise Arbogast, Jeanet Fairley, 
Sara Wood, Katharine Drane, Eleanor Sublett, Josephine Myers, 
Aline Hughes, Ruth Gebert, Bessie Folk, and Dorothy Wood. 



The St. Mary's Muse 103 

University Glee Club 

Following close after the visit of the Dramatic Club, the University 
Glee Club was with us on Saturday, February 10th, and as usual 
pleased greatly its audience, which included practically all of St. 
Mary's and many others. 

The program went with a great deal of snap and was very inter- 
esting throughout. The Club was very generous with its encores, 
and they, as well as the regular program, were much appreciated. 

As last year, the yodelling made a hit, and the audience called 
again and again for Mr. Wimberly and the Glee Club and Orchestra 
in the thirteenth number of the program, while the mandolin stirred 
up the audience strikingly with its fox-trot medley. 

The visit of the Chapel Hill organizations is always a pleasure to 
us, and this year quite as much as usual. 

Athletic Meet: Sigma, 517; Mu, 494 

The first inter-athletic meet was held on Monday, February 12th. 
The crowd that gathered was small, due partly to the various other 
events happening on that afternoon, but was very enthusiastic and 
every girl was ready and willing to do her best. The contestants, who 
are the best and most loyal members of their respective associations, 
did excellent work. The highest score of 570 points of a possible 600 
was made by Margaret Yorke, whose splendid form brought constant 
applause. Mary Hoke and Helen Battle tied for second place with 
a score of 565. Helen Battle was the only girl in the meet who 
scored 100 points in each of the three events. Rainsford Glass took 
third place, scoring 540, while Lillias Shepherd was fourth with 530. 
Lillias Shepherd's score was practically perfect in five of the events, 
but she could not keep balanced in the exercises on the balancing 
boards, which greatly lowered her customary fine score. Others who 
stood well were Anna Patch, 525 ; Muriel Dougherty and Virginia 
Royster, 515; Harriet Barber, 495; Elizabeth Bowne, 490. Among 
the smaller scorers, Virginia Staten, Elsie Freeland, and Louise King 
did especially well. 



104 The St. Mary's Muse 

Although the meet was planned "for just the fun of it," at the 

request of several of the girls, it has also helped to bring out more 

clearly the good form necessary in all athletic events. The various 

hints that we heard, "Keep your head up," "Heels together," etc., all 

had vital meaning. 

The score of the teams was as follows : 

Sigma Mu 

1. Saddles 81 67 

2. Low Boom 81 85 

3. High Boom , 90 91 

4. Box 76 76 

5. Balance Boards 88 68 

6. Buck 85 85 

7. Bowling 16 22 

517 494 

M. B. 
St. Mary's Dramatic Club: "All of a Sudden Peggy" 

The Dramatic Club usually gives its play on the Saturday night be- 
fore the Christmas holidays, but this year Miss Davis deferred it until 
Monday, February 12th. The play was Ernest Denny's three-act 
comedy, "All of a Sudden Peggy," and while it did not take us back 
to the days of Tinsley Harrison and Elizabeth Tarry, it showed again 
the great talent of Miss Davis in selecting her cast and in perfecting 
the stage setting, and reflected much credit on each of the members 
of the cast. 

Just as the female characters have the harder parts in the Univer- 
sity Dramatic Club productions, so it is the male parts that go harder 
in the productions of our own Dramatic Club, and great credit is due 
on that account to the girls impersonating men. 

Alice Latham and Mary Wilson had the romantic parts in the play 
as the youthful lovers, and were thoroughly realistic. Penelope 
Stiles gave an excellent illustration of how sometimes it is possible to 
act best by being simply oneself. Mary ISTeal and Aline Hughes did 
good work in their respective parts, but the most thoroughly satisfac- 
tory impression was made by Ruby Thorne as the Widow O'Mara. 



The St. Mary's Muse 105 

The News and Observer said of the play: 

On Monday evening, February 12th, at 8:30 o'clock, the Dramatic Club of 
Mary's School presented in the St. Mary's Auditorium Mr. Ernest Denny's 
play, "All of a Sudden Peggy." 

The play is an entertaining three-act comedy with scenes laid in an English 
country house and in London. Delightfully amusing complications arise and 
there is much fun at the expense of the English seriousness and horror at 
breaches of convention, though the suddenness of Peggy is the main theme. 

Miss Florence C. Davis, the director of the Dramatic Club, is to be heartily 
congratulated on the training of those taking part and for stage management. 
The stage setting was effective and the play went off with no hitch or drag, 
but with unusual spirit and snap. One was struck with the judgment shown 
in assigning the various parts. The difficult parts of the hero and his brother 
were well done by Miss Latham and Miss Neal; the character parts of the 
English officer and the Irish widow, taken by Miss Hughes and Miss Thorn, 
brought forth much applause, while Miss Mary C. Wilson was a charming 
Peggy and Miss Nancy Woolford a realistic and impressive English lady. 

The cast was as follows : 

Anthony, Lord Crackenthorpe, Fellow of the Entomological Society. Mary Neal 

The Hon. Jimmy Keppel, his brother Alice Latham 

Major Archie Phipps, retired Aline Hughes 

Jack Menzies Georgia Foster 

Parker, footman at Hawkhurst Lucia Slade 

Lucas, manservant at Jimmy's flat Ellen Lay 

Lady Crackenthorpe, Lord Crackenthorpe's mother Nancy Woolford 

The Hon. Millicent Keppel Penelope Stiles 

Mrs. O'Mara, widow of Professor O'Mara, F.R.S Rubie Thorn 

Peggy, her daughter Mary C. Wilson 

The Colonial Ball 

The last of the pre-Lenten School entertainments was the Colonial 
Ball, which is regularly held on the Saturday evening nearest Wash- 
ington's birthday, and so came this year on the 17th, the Saturday 
evening before Lent. The girls never looked more effective than they 
did on this evening when half of them seemed to be gallants of long 
ago and the other half their equally charming ladies. It is easy to 
realize how charming must have been the fashions of colonial days 
when we take an evening off and ourselves step back for a time into the 
early days. 

There were not as many girls in costume this year as last, but this 



106 The St. Maky's Muse 

possibly made the dancing and the general effect of the costumes more 
greatly appreciated than if the Parlor had been more crowded. 

The room was decorated with plants, with the large picture of 
Washington in its customary place on the mantel. Most of the 
Faculty were present as guests when at 8 o'clock the eighty or more 
dancers entered the room in a long procession, each beau with his lady, 
the line being led by Katharine Drane and Alice Latham. Eleanor 
Relyea and Emma Badham as George and Martha Washington were 
prominent in the ceremonies, and Dorothy Wood presided at the 
piano. During the early figures favors — flags and patriotic fans — 
were distributed. In addition to the dancing, there were two espe- 
cially effective numbers in the program in the dancing of the minuet 
and the Virginia reel. Both were very gracefully and daintily done. 
Those dancing in the minuet were: E. Ravenel and "Miss" Ruth 
Gebert, Aline Hughes and "Miss" Nina Burke, Margaret Gold and 
"Miss" Betty Rembert, and Annie McDuffie and "Miss" Mary Wilson. 
Those dancing the Virginia reel were : Nellie Rose and "Miss" Kath- 
arine Drane, Jeanet Fairley and "Miss" Virginia P. Allen, Martha 
Wright and "Miss" Evelyn Moss, Marian Drane and "Miss" Frances 
Cheatham, Maud Moss and "Miss" Anne Wilson, Annie Ivey and 
"Miss" Sara Wood. 

Ice-cream and cake were served as refreshments, each plate being 
adorned with a small red souvenir hatchet. 

The Cotillion Club Dance 

The Cotillion Club, composed of the dancing girls in School who 
"lead," gave its second dance of the year in the Parlor on Monday 
afternoon, February 19th. Frances Hillman was at the piano and 
Emily Sue Butt and Molly Taliaferro served punch. 

The members and their guests were as follows : Jeanet Fairley 
and "Miss" Virginia P. Allen, Maud Moss and "Miss" Dorothy 
Wood, Helen Brigham and "Miss" Camilla McMullan, Anne Wilson 
and "Miss" Evelyn Moss, Marian Drane and "Miss" Bessie Folk, 
Katharine Darden and "Miss" Katharine Drane, Anita Smith and 
"Miss" Annie Ivey, Nellie Rose and "Miss" Frances Cheatham, 



The St. Mary's Muse 107 

Sara Rawlings and "Miss" Dorothy Powell, Estelle Ravenel and 
"Miss" Ruth Gebert, Annie Robinson and "Miss" Nancy Woolford, 
Katharine Arbogast and "Miss" Virginia Staten, Mary Divine and 
"Miss" Alice Latham, Eleanor Relyea and "Miss" Emma Badham. 
Stag: Constance Kent. F. H. 0., '17. 

Mr. Rudolph Renter, Pianist 

On the evening of Monday, February 19th, the third and last of 
this year's season of Peace-St. Mary's Concerts was given in the 
School Auditorium by Mr. Rudolph Reuter, concert pianist. 

The girls and faculties of the two schools made up the greater part 
of the audience, and they found the program very enjoyable and 
formed a very favorable impression of Mr. Reuter's art. This was 
his program: 

Bourree Bach-St. Saens 

Gavotte Gluck-Brahms 

Novelette in E Schumann 

Caprice genre Scarlatti Paderewski 

Paganini Variations, Op. 35 Brahms 

(18 Variations from Books 1 and 2) 

Intermezzo, Op. 116, No. 4 Brahms 

Intermezzo, Op. 119, No. 3 Brahms 

Nocturne in F minor Chopin 

Nocturne in E, Op. 62 Chopin 

Scherzo in C sharp minor Chopin 

Rhapsody in G minor (new) Bernard Dieter 

Quejas, o la Maja y el Ruisenor Granados 

Scherzo — Impromptu, Op. 73 Grieg 

Christmas Night Busoni 

Rhapsody, "Dies Irae" Dohndnyi 

Waldesrauschen Liszt 

Egolgue (Annees de Pelerinage) Liszt 

Carnaval de Pesth Liszt 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price *,',,,,,** One Dollar 

Single Copies --**--»-- Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's 
School, Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the 
editorial management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1916-17. 

Virginia Caroline Allen, '17 Editor-in-Chief 

Elmyra Jenkins, '17 Exchange Editor 

Alice Cohn Latham, '17 



1 



.Senior Reporters 
Annie Huske Robinson, '17 

Estelle Strozier Ravenel, '18 ) 

I Junior Reporters 

Katharine Parker Drane, '18 \ 

Emma Hudgins Badham, '17 Business Manager 

Frances Howe Cheatham, '17 

I Assistant Business Managers 

Sara Louise Wood, '18 



EDITORIAL 



The 1917 "Statistics" 

As always, the taking of "Statistics" was this year a very exciting 

occasion. January 30th was the date chosen and the same method 

was followed as in past years, resulting in the following selections : 

Most popular Estelle Ravenel 

Prettiest Katharine Drane 

Most attractive Sarah Rawlings 

Most musical Martha Wright 

Neatest Helen Brigham 

Best looking Lucia Slade 

Best student Bessie Folk 

Best dancer (leader) Mary Ruth Divine 

Best dancer (follower) Alice Latham 

Most athletic Helen Brigham 

Most ambitious Henrietta Morgan 

Most enthusiastic Nancy Woolford 



The St. Maky's Muse 109 

Most lovable Frances Cheatham 

Most influential Alice Latham 

Best all-round Alice Latham 

Most conscientious Emma Badham 

Most unselfish Georgia Foster 

Most dignified Virginia C. Allen 

Most thoughtful Frances Hillman 

Most Practical Annie Robinson 

Cutest Gertrude Merrimon 



Academic Standing — First Half Year, 19I6-'I6 

The academic standing of the leading students during the Advent 

Term were as follows : 

Hours. 1 mo. 2 mo. 3 mo. 4 mo Term. 

1. B. Folk, '18 (15) 92.5 94.6 94.5 95.6 95.8 

2. K. Drane, '18 (18) 92.1 93.5 91.7 93.8 93.6 

3. E. Peel, '17 (13) 91.8 94.2 92.6 93.9 93.3 

4. H. Morgan, '18 (17) 90.9 93.9 93.1 94.2 93.2 

5. E. Relyea, '17 (19) 90.2 92.1 93.1 93.9 92.8 

6. M. B. Wilson, '22 (15) 92.7 91.2 93.6 92.0 92.3 

7. M. Edwards, '18 (20) 91.8 92.6 92.1 92.4 92.0 

8. M. Lindsey, '20 (20) 88.6 90.0 89.6 93.0 91.7 

9. E. Baker, '22 (14) 90.3 91.0 91.2 92.8 91.2 

10. M. Alston, '21 (18) 89.3 90.5 91.2 92.7 91.0 

11. A. Hughes, '18 (22) 89.4 90.5 90.9 92.0 90.9 

12. M. Dougherty, '22 (13) 89.5 91.2 89.8 92.1 90.7 

13. E. Badham, '17 (15) 86.1 90.1 89.8 88.6 90.3 

14. A. Robinson, '17 (13) 90.2 89.8 89.9 89.2 89.8 

15. A. Pratt, '18 (19) 89.2 88.8 89.8 90.5 89.7 

16. M. Drane, '19 (19) 86.4 89.1 88.8 88.9 89.6 

17. F. Morgan, Prep (16) 87.6 89.2 90.2 90.7 89.2 

18. A. Stone, '20 (16) 85.5 85.5 87.4 87.5 88.7 

19. V. C. Allen, '17 (16) 87.8 89.3 90.4 88.8 88.6 

20. F. Cheatham, '17 (15) 87.1 87.9 89.3 87.7 88.5 

21. M. Jones, '19 (19) 86.7 85.5 87.6 88.9 88.2 

22. K. Batts, *20 (18) 87.0 90.5 89.0 89.5 88.2 

23. M. Wright, '18 (18) 86.3 87.4 87.5 90.0 88.1 

24. L. Clarke, '20 (14) 86.0 87.4 86.8 88.9 87.6 

25. H. Mason, '18 (20) 85.8 87.4 89.0 88.5 87.5 

26. H. Battle, '20 (21) 87.3 90.2 89.0 89.3 87.4 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank, Alumna Editor 

St. Mary's Alumnse Association. 

Honorary President - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

Honorary Vice-Presidents - / Mra - L MoK - P ittin ger. Raleigh. 

I Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West, Durham. 
President - Mrs. W. E. Lindsay, Spartanburg, S. C 

Vice-President - Mrs. A. L. Baker, Raleigh 

Secretary - - - - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



The May 12th Celebration 

The details are now being arranged for the May 12th celebration 
of the seventy-fifth anniversary of the opening of the School. It is 
hoped to make it an even bigger occasion for the alumnse than the 
celebration of the fiftieth anniversary in 1892, and the presence of a 
large body of representative alumna?, especially of those of recent 
years, seems assured. 

May 12th falls on Saturday, which is not the most convenient day 
for a one-day celebration, and the program has had to be made to fit 
the day. 

It is planned to make the celebration in large part a home-coming 
for the alumnse, with the Faculty and girls doing what they can to 
make it seem a genuine home-coming, to entertain the visitors and to 
revive as fully and pleasantly as possible the fond recollections of 
their St. Mary's days. So far as the physical accommodations will 
allow, the visiting alumnse will be entertained at the School, having 
their meals as of yore in the School dining-room and being quartered 
in the School buildings. 

While an effort will be made to reach as many of the alumnse as 
possible with personal invitations, should any fail to receive these in- 
vitations, a line to the School will set matters straight and assure 
them a warm welcome. It will, of course, be necessary to know as 
early as possible who may be expected, and the alumnse receiving in- 
vitations will naturally write at once to inform us whether they can 
come. 



The St. Mary's Muse 111 

The formal celebration of the anniversary will be held in the Audi- 
torium on Friday evening, May 11th, with addresses, etc. The cele- 
bration of May 12th will be largely a more or less informal student 
and alumnse program, with the special feature the St. Mary's festival 
or pageant which will be given in the grove in the late afternoon. 

All those who were present at the Shakespearian pageant last spring 
or who have heard of it from their friends know of its great success, 
and it will unquestionably be a great pleasure to them to know that 
Miss Thomas will get up a like festival for this May 12th, with the 
substitution of the St. Mary's theme for that of Shakespeare. 

Details of the celebration and other matters of the occasion will be 
published in full in the following number of the Muse, which should 
follow this number in about a week. 



The Endowment Campaign 

From the standpoint of tangible results the endowment campaign 
would seem to be progressing slowly, but the Rev. Francis M. Os- 
borne, the special representative of the Trustees, in charge of raising 
the fund, is developing his campaign and feels encouraged with the 
widespread interest that he finds manifest. 

Mr. Osborne has visited many towns in the Carolinas during the 
winter and has everywhere met encouragement. The actual work 
of the canvass has had to be delayed in most places both in order to 
attend the preliminary matters necessary and largely because of the 
campaign for the Church Pension Fund, which was brought to such 
a triumphant conclusion on March 1st. The success of the Sewanee 
endowment campaign and of the Church Pension Fund show what 
can be done when those interested are aroused. 

The only canvass which has been actually made outside of Raleigh 
was that in Winston-Salem in the middle of January, and is described 
by Mr. Osborne in the following article : 

THE ST. MARY'S SCHOOL FUND. 
A Canvass in Winston - Salem. 
The latter part of January and first part of February I had expected to 
spend in the Diocese of East Carolina, where we have already done some pre- 



112 The St. Mary's Muse 

paratory work and organized our committees in anticipation of a canvass for 
the $250,000 fund for St. Mary's School; but the Church Pension Fund fully 
occupied the field and properly claimed the right of way, so I addressed my- 
self to the task of concluding the work which had been started at Winston- 
Salem. 

In the progressive Twin-City of the Piedmont section the parish is without 
a rector. But the St. Paul's Church Club meets regularly once a month and is 
not only the livest thing in the church at Winston-Salem, but the most virile 
Church club I have ever seen in North Carolina. This organization espoused 
the cause and appointed a committee to co-operate in the canvass. Twenty- 
five loyal alumnae of St. Mary's offered their help. A committee of 50, made 
up of men and women from the Episcopal, Baptist, Presbyterian, Methodist 
and Moravian churches, was organized. The local papers co-operated and 
The Journal published an editorial notice on "St. Mary's School an Asset of 
the State." A supper was served and a brief and vigorous canvass was made. 
One hundred and thirty-six subscriptions were made, amounting to $2,654.50. 
The committee expect to follow up what had begun so as to raise $3,000. 

The best part of the canvass in Winston-Salem was the fine spirit of co- 
operation and the heartiness, not only of our church people, but of almost 
everybody else. There is much wealth in Winston-Salem, but it is outside 
of the Episcopal Church, so no large contributions were made. St. Paul's 
Church has less than 300 communicants, but the churchmen met the issue 
squarely and gave generously in proportion to their ability. One man gave 
$125 — the largest donation. Six others gave $100 each, a dozen gave $50 each, 
and so on. Many non-Episcopalians gave small amounts to show good will 
and sympathy. A Baptist was one of the best workers and gave $50. The 
Moravians gave both money and words of cheer. Dr. Howard Rondthaler, 
President of Salem College and Academy, heartily commended the claim of 
St. Mary's upon all the people of the Carolinas, and said that our method of 
presenting the claim should inaugurate a new era in Christian education by 
establishing a new viewpoint. And so we believe that good wishes and good 
will follow gifts of the people of Winston-Salem. This is of great value to the 
school, and your representative is satisfied with the result. Other cities of 
the Carolinas may give more in bulk, and because of the wealth of men who 
are Episcopalians should give more per capita, but it will be hard for any 
town to show a better spirit or to do better in proportion to the ability of its 
church people. Winston-Salem is the first place outside of Raleigh to make a 
systematic canvass, and the result is creditable to those who carried it 
through. FRANCIS M. OSBORNE, 

Special Representative of the Trustees of St. Mary's School. 



Mr. BancRer Srrjedes and the Smedes Family 

The recent death of Mr. Bancker Smedes at his home in Boonton, 
N. J"., removes the last of the Smedes men of Dr. Bennett Smedes' 



The St. Mary's Muse 113 

generation and ends the Smedes name in that part of the family 
which has come to be connected with Raleigh. This seems, therefore, 
a fitting time to call attention to some of the facts with reference to 
the Smedeses which are of interest to all those who are interested in 
St. Mary's, but which may be lost sight of in the passing of the years. 

Mr. Bancker Smedes was the son of the Rev. John Smedes, who 
was the younger brother of the Rev. Aldert Smedes, the Founder of 
St. Mary's, and was the brother of Mrs. Augustus W. Knox (Eliza 
Smedes), of Mrs. John Holmes of Chapel Hill (Emilie Smedes), 
and of Miss Henrietta Smedes of Washington, D. C, all of them 
graduates of St. Mary's, and his wife was Miss Lily S. Hicks, form- 
erly of Raleigh, and also a graduate of St. Mary's. His only brother, 
Mr. Charles Smedes, died several years ago. 

It will be remembered that the Smedeses were a Kentucky family, 
and Rev. Dr. Aldert Smedes was born there. He was educated in 
the North, had parish work in New York State, and came from New 
York City to Raleigh in 1842 to found St. Mary's. Many years 
later his younger brother, the Rev. John Smedes, also came to Raleigh 
from parish work in St. Augustine, Fla., and became the principal of 
St. Augustine's School, Raleigh. Dr. Aldert Smedes had six sons 
in addition to his three daughters, and Rev. John Smedes had the 
two sons and three daughters mentioned above. And as all the sons 
grew to manhood it was natural to suppose that the Smedes name 
in this branch of the family was well established; but none of the 
eight Smedes men left a son behind him. 

Rev. Aldert Smedes was one of a family of six sons, and the other 
four boys, Charles, William, George, and Bancker, spent their lives 
further south, mostly in Louisiana. All had daughters who were 
St. Mary's girls — Mary Tolley and Helen, Alice, and Susan, Lewella 
and Mary C. (Niecie). Miss Mary C. Smedes now lives in Cades, 
La., where she is an interested Church worker and still active in 
thought of St. Mary's, as evidenced, among other things, in her inter- 
est in having Nina Burke and Ruth Gebert become St. Mary's girls. 

The Rev. Aldert Smedes's son Lyell, invalided from the War, went 
to Louisiana, there married Miss Susan Dabney, and died shortly 
after, in 1862. His wife will be remembered as the author of The 



114 The St. Mary's Muse 

Memories of a Southern Planter. Mr. Bennett Smedes, the second 
son, was a chaplain in the Confederate Army, and then became asso- 
ciated with his father at St. Mary's, succeeding him as Rector. The 
next two boys, Ives and Edward, were just coming to manhood when 
the war broke out, and both went from their home at St. Mary's to 
die for the Confederacy. 

The youngest two, George and Abe, were not old enough to enter 
the army, but on growing up became lawyers, and both died unmar- 
ried as young men. 

Dr. Aldert Smedes's three girls, all devoted daughters of St. Mary's, 
are well known to those at the School, because their lives are near the 
present at St. Mary's in time or place. Bessie, the oldest, married 
Mr. M. T. Leak, who died many years ago, and she has made her 
home in recent years with her brother-in-law and sister in Durham. 
Annie, the second, married Mr. Charles Root of Raleigh, and her 
two daughters, Sadie (Mrs. W. W. Robards) and Annie (Mrs. W. W. 
Vass), are both graduates of St. Mary's, while her only son, Dr. Aldert 
Smedes Root, preserves his grandfather's name for the present gener- 
ation. The youngest daughter, Sadie, is the wife of Mr. W. A. 
Erwin of West Durham, and their three daughters, Bessie (Mrs. 
Hamilton Jones of Charlotte), Margaret (Mrs. James W. Glenn of 
Winston-Salem), and Sarah, are all St. Mary's girls. 

It can be seen from these facts how closely the lives of the Smedeses 
have been intertwined with the history of St. Mary's. 



A Word from Abroad 

"Olive Smith" finished her five years as a St. Mary's girl in 1914, 
a sufficiently close date for some of her school friends to still be at 
St. Mary's, fast as student generations pass. In these days of deep 
concern, when even those of us furthest away long to be able to be of 
service to country and to mankind, the following letter lately received 
from Miss Smith will be of general interest and of especial interest 
to her friends. 

Miss Smith is a daughter of the Rev. C. Ernest Smith, D.C.L., 
Rector of St. Thomas's Church, Washington, D. C, who has been on 



The St. Mary's Muse 115 



two occasions in recent years one of our commencement speakers. He 
is an Englishman, and Miss Olive went to England to visit her uncle. 

London, W. C, England, February 2, 1917. 

Dear Mb. C: — The dainty St. Mary's card and calendar, bringing me assur- 

I ance of your thoughtful friendship, was sent on to me here, and I want to 

i thank you so warmly for them both. My thoughts were with you all, and I 

would have loved to have borrowed one of the many airships we see so often 

practicing, so that I could have run in to see you for a few hours and wished 

you "Merry Christmas" in person. 

Instead, Christmas morning I spent in the Military Hospital in Kingston, 
where I have been doing some nursing. Everything imaginable had been 
, given toward the men's Christmas dinner, and we were all frightfully busy 
setting the long table and getting things straight generally. The men had 
made the wards most attractive with evergreens and paper flowers, and when 
everything was ready and the blue hospital suits and khaki uniforms were 
seated around the fairly creaking table I did so long for a flashlight. We 
did get a photograph a few days later, but it was only fair. 

Today is gray and "snowy," and I am wishing I was in "the land of the 
long-leaf pine." . . . 
With every good wish and renewed appreciation, ever sincerely, 

OLIVE SMITH. 



A Legend of the St. John's River 

It has been several years since the Muse had the pleasure of pub- 
lishing a contribution from Miss Serena C. Bailey, who was its 
editor-in-chief in 1907. But, as those who were here in her day will 
remember, her writings then were a very important part of the Muse. 
Miss Bailey's home is in Palatka, Florida, and the following verses 
on "The St. John's River" appeared in the Women s Club Annual, 
published by the women of Palatka last fall : 

A sovereign's jewel box, in ages past, 
Was overturned, and lo! the glittering gems 
Were scattered on a carpet green and vast, 
And left to lie and sparkle in the sun. 

The casket was a plan of God fulfilled, 
The carpet formed a country fair and green; 
What, then, the wondrous jewels that were spilled, 
That borrowed warmth and beauty from the sun? 

A sapphire chain, of rich and gorgeous hue, 
Was changed into a river, winding, long, 
Whose wide expanse of waters, heavenly blue, 
Is like a string of jewels in the sun. 

SERENA C. BAILEY. 



116 The St. Maky's Muse 



Alumnae Weddings 

Anderson - Martin : On "Wednesday, January 3, in Williamston, N. C, Miss 
Fannie Biggs Martin (S. M. S., 1913-15) and Mr. Oscar Shannon Ander- 
son. 

Flanigan - Nicholson : On Tuesday, February 13, in Emmanuel Church, 
Athens, Ga., Miss Marian Schley Nicholson (S. M. S., 1912-13) and Lieut. 
Barrington Lockhart Flanigan, U. S. A. 

Lynah - Howards On Thursday, February 15, at Savannah, Ga., Miss Augusta 
Clyatt Howard (S. M. S., 1913-14) and Mr. John Heyward Lynah, Jr. At 
home, Savannah, Ga. 



Dec. 


16: 


Dec. 


20: 


Jan. 


27: 


Feb. 


3: 


Feb. 


7: 


Feb. 


10: 


Feb. 


12: 


Feb. 


17: 


Feb. 


21: 


Mar. 


25: 


Mar. 


31: 


Apr. 


1: 


Apr. 


8: 


Apr. 


18: 


Apr. 


25: 


Apr. 


21: 


Apr. 


28: 


May. 


5: 


May 


12: 


May 


19: 


May 


26: 


May 27: 


May 29: 



St. Mary's Calendar, !9I6-'I7 



Christmas to Easter. 
The Operetta, "Patience." 
Kindersymphonie. 
Christmas Tree Entertainment. 
Return Inter-class Parties. 
University of North Carolina Dramatic Club. 
Reception to Mrs. Bickett. 
University of North Carolina Glee Club. 
Indoor Athletic Meet. 

St. Mary's Dramatic Club, "All of a Sudden Peggy." 
Colonial Ball. 

Ash Wednesday. Lent began. 
Spring Track Meet. 

First Inter-society debate. Sigma Lambda-Alpha Rho. 
Bishop's visit for Confirmation. 
Easter Day. 

Easter to Commencement. 
Second Inter-society debate. Epsilon Alpha Pi-Alpha Rho. 
Third Inter-society debate. Sigma Lambda-Epsilon Alpha Pi. 
Muse Lawn Party. 
Junior-Senior "Banquet." 
School Party. 

Alumnae Day. Seventy-fifth Anniversary Celebration. 
Chorus Concert. 
Annual Play. 
Commencement Sunday. 
Graduation Day. 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
eaders of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
iricciple to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
hem to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
t is their loss, not ours. 



DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 

2C6-10 MASONIC TEMPLE 



Success in the Campaign for the Raising of the $250,000 
Fund to pay off the debt and provide additional new build- 
ings, and the beginning of an Endowment Fund is of the 
utmost importance to St. Mary's. 

Think of it, talk of it, and help in every way you can. 



B.W.JONES 
The 

Best in 
Groceries 

Phones 667-668 528 Hillsboro Street 



'You get them when promised' 



Hortoh s Studio 

Masonic Temple 



"Workers in Artistic Photography' 



Advertisements 



Stationery, College Linen, Pennants, 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 



Bell Phone 135 



RALEIGH, N. 0. 



JOHNSON & BROUGHTON 
Good Things to Eat 

122 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

Coal, Wood, Ice, Brick 
122 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. 0. 

H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 



CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 
Power and Gas 

1376— BOTH PHONES— 1377 



WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 0. 



Wm. Heller 

THE FOOTERY SHOP 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THE ALUMINLE ARE REMINDED 
that a complete Alumnce Register, which should include 
information about all past students of St. Mary's, is 
now in course of preparation for publication. 

Information for this Register is solicited. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 

Safe, Secure, and Successful 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON. Treasurer 

R. S. BUSBEE, Secretary 

Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

Charles E. Johnson, Jr., 

RALEIGH, N. (J. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 



Hafapette 



A Cafe which invites the patronagre of 
ladies. The g-irls of St. Mary's will enjoy 
the beauty and convenience of our modern, 
well-appointed dining- place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

Raleigh, N.C. 

THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 

GOLF, TENNIS, AND SPORTING GOODS 

MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
104 EAST HARGETT ST. Bell Phone 719 



Advertisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STORE 

Phones 228 



HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

The Big Hardware Men Raleigh, N. C. 



Base Balls, Basket Balls 
Tennis and Sporting Goods 



Raleigh French Dry Cleaning 1 Company 

Comer Blount and Morgan Streets. 


Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 

Phone 529 


PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

12 W. Hargett St. 

o 


DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 


RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 


T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies. 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 



Subscriptions for the monthly Muse are very accsptable 
at all times. One dollar will bring the ten copies of the 
Muse published next after its receipt. 



PERRY'S ART STORE 

S Wilmington St. 



California Fruit Store, in Fayetteville St.. Raleigh 

Fancy fruits and pure ice cream. Best equipped and most 
Sanitary ice cream factory in the state. Our cream is the 
"Quality Kind." Send us your orders. California Fruit 
atore, 111 F ayetteyil le St.. Vurn ak es& Co.. Pr ops . , Ra leigh. 

BATES-ARRINGTON & COMPANY 
PURE FOOD GROCERIES 



HAYES & HALL— STUDIO 



MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 



J. L. O'Quinn & Co. 

Florists 



L. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 



MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 
VISITING CARDS 

CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY ENGRAVED 

Send for samples and prices 

Edwards & Groughton Printing 
Company 

Steel Die and Copper Plate Engrayers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 



Raleigh's Leading and Largest Hotel 



Dinners and Banquets a Specialty 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Co.. Proprietor* 



Jolly & Wynne Jewelr/ Co. 



COLLEGE 
JEWELRY 



128 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



WATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades. 

SHOES! WHOSE? 
BERNARD L. CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street 

GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 



YOUNG & HUGHES 



Plumbers 

Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 



S. Wilmington Street 



C. D. ARTHUR City Market 
FTSH AND OYSTERS 

ELLINGTONS ART SI ORE 

RALEIGH. N C. 

College Pennants, Pillows, Pictures, 
Frames, Novelties 

F.OYSTEK'S CANDY A S"K«IALTY 

Made Fresh Every Day 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tick- 
ets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, as well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
trip to any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. They will 
gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the 
cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you 



H. F. CARY, General Pass. Agent, 
Washington, D. C. 



J. O. JONES, Traveling Pass. Agent, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements 



Vt. Mary's Girls Always Welcome at 

Hudson-Belk Company 

Full line of Ready-to-wear, Hosiery, Gloves, Furnishings, Dry 
Goods, Shoes, Toilet Goods, Ribbons and Laces 



ESTABLISHED 1858 



I. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

1ALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



M. ROSENTHAL & COMPANY 

GROCERS 

Wilmington and Hargett Street* 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 
AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Cor. Fayetteville and Hargett Sts. 



THOMAS A PARTIN COMPANY 

Raleigh, N. 0. 

Specialty of Ladies' Ready-to- Wear Gar- 
ments and Gossard's Lace Front Corsets 



THE SCHOOL AUTHORITIES 

are at all times pleased to send full information 
about St. Mary's on request without charge. 
We should like every one interested to have at 
least copies of 

The Illustrated Catalogue, 

The Books of Views, 

The Song Book. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



BOYLAN-PEARGE 

COMPANY 

The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 



Advebtisements 



m e mm e s- 




j Exclusive 

jj Millinery 



RALEIGH *i.C 



W. E. BONNER 
Shoe Repairing: 



Raleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' 
and Misses' Ready-to- Wear Garments 

TEN PER CENT OFF TO COLLEGE GIRLS 

Cfje jf astfnon 

KAPLAN BROS. COMPANY 

Fayetteville Street 

ORDER YOUR CUT FLOWERS 



J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Phone 149 

SEE 

Herbert Rosenthal 

FOR REAL SHOES 



Gome to the 75th Anniversary 
May 12th 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 

Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



NORFOLK 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 

Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule, Best Service Double Daily Express Service 



H. S. LEARD, G. P. A. 

Norfolk, Va, 



J. F. MITCHELL, T. P. A. 

Raleigh, N. C. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Marts School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

75th AirarUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBEE 15, 1916. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGAN JANUARY 25, 1917. 



1. TEE COLLEGE 

2. TEE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
St. Mary's \ 3 TRE ART DEPARTMENT 

offers 

instruction { k? TEE ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 
in these j 5% TEE HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 

Departments I 

' 6. TEE BUSINESS SCEOOL 
7. TEE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



In 1916-17 are enrolled 275 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 
Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 
Dormitories. 
Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 
slight to the Scholastic training. 
For catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, D. & L., 

Rector. 

EDWARDS a BROUGHTON PRINTING CO.. RALEIGH N. C. 



t JJlarp'a jWu*e 

&aletgf), 31. C. 



Carter J^umfcer 

Spril, 1917 



SPRING CALENDAR, 1917 



April 8 : 
April 9 : 
April 14 
April 21 
April 28 
May 5: 
May 12 
May 19 
May 26 



Easter Day. 

Annual Easter Egg Hunt. Dance. 

Muse Entertainment. 

Lawn Party. 

Fifth Annual "Junior-Senior Banquet." 

Sixth Annual "School Party." 

Alumnse Day. Seventy-fifth Anniversary Exercises. 

Annual Recital of the Chorus. 

Annual Play. 



May 27-29 : Commencement. 



The St. Mary's Muse 

EASTER NUMBER 
Vol. XXI April, 1917 JSTo. 5 



Rejoice ! 

Awake, ye ancient Heavens ! 

And ye mighty worlds. 

Shout forth the tidings o'er the trembling earth! 

Ye, who but now, in awful wonder hushed, 

Beheld the God of Heaven lay down 

His life for sinful man. 

Awake! and ye, ye glorious stars, 

Sing forth and shout with joy 

Until the quaking firmament resounds 

And the vast universe 

Re-echoes with your voice. 

And thou, O soul of man, arise triumphant! 

Lift thou up thine head 

Long ages bowed beneath the yoke of sin. 

Behold the vanquished tomb 

Behold it, rent asunder by the mighty God from Heaven! 

Behold the powers of darkness 

Quelled before the glorious Prince of Light. 

The Son of God is risen! 

And behold, freed from their bondage 

With Him rise the sons of men. 

There is no death, no woe, 

No tomb, no darkness more! 

Behold the Light burst forth 

Across the eastern hills. 

It is the Love of God, 

Awakening the glad earth 

And filling all the Heaven with radiance. 

Rejoice ye! for the darkness is o'er past, 

Terror and night are vanquished and are flown. 

It is the Immortal Day. 

Annie Sutton Cameron, '16. 



118 The St. Mary's Muse 



The Tail of an Easter Chicken 



Margaret Rosalie DuBose 



(This story, by " Margaret DuBose," '05 (Mrs. Isaac T. Avery, of Morganton), was written 
for the 1905 Easter Muse] 

As father Rooster always said, ma was a specihen of the higher 
education of women, and that came near being the death of this poor 
chick. When she was quite young she went to a grand university 
called Incubator, and she has spent the rest of her life forcing us to 
live up to the many ideas she caught there (and to judge from their 
number, she must have spent all her time catching them). Our first 
day of life (there were only thirteen of us) was made miserable be- 
cause she said at her "dear old Alma 'Bator, chickens were fed on the 
most hygienic-nutritious-albuminous food stuff, mixed in a tin plat- 
ter," and we should begin life properly. After scratching in the 
sand for a "tin platter," father admitted that he had never seen nor 
heard of one, and didn't believe such things grew in our part of the 
country, so he brought us some delicious fat earth-worms, which 
"filled the bill" in every way. 

Soon after that, ma said she believed in woman's rights, and why 
shouldn't hens crow as well as roosters, anyway ? She tried it once 
right out in the public Barnyard Square, and old Uncle Rastus threw 
a rock at her and swore he wouldn't have "no hens a-tryin' to ac' lak 
roosters 'roun' him, no sah-ree-bob !" That awful threat quieted her 
until the next day, when she decided that it was time for us to begin 
to study Botany and Garden Classics. We were all studiously exam- 
ining the roots of the new-planted green-peas when Uncle Rastus 
came in sight. "H'ar she is, sah ! de most perniciest and high-f alutin- 
est hen what ever I seed ! You kin hab her, sah, fo' yo' Easter doins 
and de unlucky thirteen chicks fo' mos' nothin' !" Then followed an 
awful time, the bare mention of which causes tears to stream from 
my eyes. Not to dwell on the harrowing story, we were all dumped 
into a wagon and taken to the front of a store. The window we were in 
was covered with horribly clean sand, and though you could see into 



The St. Mary's Muse 119 

the street there was an awful thing that bumped your head when you 
tried to get out that way. Soon a horrible man came in with a big 
basin. He grabbed me and was just about to plunge me in, when I 
gave a desperate squeak, kick and wiggle combined, reached the floor 
and escaped by the opening at which he came in. Free at last ! But 
thoughts of ma and the others led me back in front of that fatal win- 
dow, and what do you think I saw there ? 

In place of the twelve fluffy little yellow brothers and sisters I had 
left behind me, were so many brilliant green, blue, and red balls, with 
beady eyes, — and "Diamond," the baby of the family, was blue on 
one side and red on the other. Mother must have thought she was 
back at her beloved Incubator, for she was giving the chicks our old 
familiar lesson of walking gently, by putting the toes down first and 
counting ten between each step. All of a sudden my eyes caught this 
horrible sign, and the meaning flashed over me, "Diamond Dyes" ! 
What ! "Diamond," our pet ! the brightest of us all, to die ! And 
before she was a week old ! My only hope lay in finding father Roos- 
ter, so I ran like mad down the street. I had an awful fright once 
when I came to an open field where some boys were playing ball, and 
one called out, "Foul !" Now, I knew he meant me (for mother used 
to fall father a "fowl" when she was very mad with him) ; but I ran 
all the faster. At last I found a nest right up on a porch, but it 
looked so homelike that I just had to crawl into it. Then for the 
first time I chanced to smooth my beloved tail, and, to my horror, I 
found it was a bright red ! Just like "Diamond" ! Perhaps "Dia- 
mond" will die from that awful bright color, and then I w T ould, too. 
So thinking, I sobbed myself to sleep. 

I thought I had died and entered the chicken's paradise, when the 
next morning the softest little hand touched me and the sweetest little 
voice said, "O ! muwer, Santa Claus has brought me a truly live 
Easter chicken, with a very Easter tail. Can't I keep it always ?" 



120 The St. Mart's Muse 



SCHOOL NEWS 



The Lenten Lectures 

The special Chapel services this Lent were on Wednesday and Fri- 
day evenings at 6, consisting of shortened evening prayer and a brief 
address. 

The Ash Wednesday sermon was preached by the Rev. Francis M. 
Osborne. For his series of Lenten addresses Dr. Lay chose the 
Christian in his Daily Life, speaking in separate addresses of The 
Christian in (1) his Amusements; (2) his Business; (3) his 
Thoughts; (4) his Conversation. 

The fourth week in Lent the addresses were by Rev. C. E. Bentley, 
Rector of St. Luke's Church, Lincolnton, and Rev. Mr. Osborne ; and 
in the fifth week, in the absence of the Rector, the Rev. Charles A. 
Ashby, who has lately taken up his work as Rector of the Church of 
the Good Shepherd, Raleigh, in succession to Dr. Pittenger, made the 
addresses. 

During Holy Week the Rector spoke on the events of each day. 

The Rector spent the fifth week of Lent in Knoxville, Tenn., where 
he delivered the daily addresses at the midday Lenten meetings for 
men. 

The Bishop's Visitation 

The annual visitation of the Bishop to administer Confirmation 
took place at the 5 o'clock service on Palm Sunday, as heretofore. 

At the morning service the sacrament of Baptism was adminis- 
tered and Evelyn Byrd Moss was baptized. 

At the afternoon service Bishop Cheshire confirmed a class of ten 

girls. Those confirmed were: 

Louise Clarke, Savannah, Ga. 
Bessie Folk, Raleigh. 
Elsie Freeland, Newport News, Va. 
Laura Hawkins, Jacksonville, Fla. 
Evelyn Moss, Berkley, Va. 
Catherine Mott, Dixondale, Va. 
Virginia Staten, Charlotte, N. C. 
Mollie Taliaferro, Zanoni, Va. 
Janet White, Scotland Neck, N. C. 
Anne Wilson, Berkley, Va. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



121 



St Mary's and the Red Cross Work 

The announcement of the classes in First Aid Work which are 
being given so generally this year over the country in connection with 
the Red Cross work was received at St. Mary's with much enthusiasm, 
and about eighty girls and teachers were enrolled for the course. 
Those taking the course were divided into three sections, and the two 
lessons a week have extended through Lent, the instructors being Drs. 
West, Thompson, and Bell of Raleigh. 

The following members of the School took the course : 



SECTION 1. 
Dr. Bell. 
Mrs. Lay 
Miss Thompson 
Miss Barton 

B. Albertson 
V. C. Allen 
K. Coker 

M. Collins 
H. Cooper 
R. Darden 
M. Ferebee 
M. Forester 
R. Glass 
F. Hillman 
A. Latham 
E. B. Lay 
E. Moss 

C. McMullan 
E. Pender 
M. Mullins 
A. Shumate 
H. Snyder 
E. Sublett 
V. Williams 
M. C. Wilson 
A. Withers 
N. Woolford 



SECTION 2. 
Dr. Thompson. 
Miss Lee 
Miss Thomas 
Miss M. Bottum 
Miss Dowd 
Mile. Rudnicka 
V. P. Allen 
L. Arbogast 

E. Badham 
N. Burke 

F. Cheatham 
S. Davis 

K. Drane 
A. Ivey 

C. Kent 
J. Myers 
H. McCoy 
A. McDuffle 
L. McLaws 

A. Pratt 
M. Polk 
E. Relyea 

B. Sheldon 
A. Smith 
V. Staten 
A. Stone 

H. Tarwater 

D. Wood 

A. Williams 



SECTION 3. 
Dr. West. 
Miss Robbins 
Miss Roberts 
Miss F. Bottum 
M. Drane 
A. Hughes 

D. Hyman 

E. Jenkins 
L. King 

M. Kirtland 

E. Lacey 

H. Laughinghouse 

N. Moye 

E. Ravenel 

E. Rembert 

A. Robinson 

N. Rose 

A. Seed 

K. Shuford 

L. Slade 

S. Smith 

P. Stiles 

M. Wright 

S. Wiley 

E. Waddell 

M. Wilkes 

M. Yorke 



Dr. Lay's Trip to Knoxville 

Dr. Lay left Raleigh March 25th and went to Knoxville at the 
request of Rev. Walter C. Whitaker, D.D., the Rector of St John's 



122 The St. Mary's Muse 

Church there, for the purpose of making addresses at special services 
during the week. The services were held in a hall on Main street at 
noon on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, the subject 
being "Moral Conservation of the Young." Dr. Lay also delivered 
five other sermons in the chapel of St. John's Church. 

He was very delightfully entertained and enjoyed having supper 
with the family of Miss Ellen Johnson, a St. Mary's graduate of 
1913, and who is now a Senior in the University of Tennessee. Dr. 
Lay returned to the School on Saturday, March 31st. 



ATHLETIC EVENTS 



March 10— Volley Ball 

Mu, 59 ; Sigma, 43 

On Saturday, March 10th, at 7 :45 p. m., the Junior Volley Ball 
teams played a most exciting game in the Gymnasium. This was 
the first game of the season, and all the members were full of enthusi- 
asm and did splendid playing. Interest in the game never flagged, 
as the outcome was uncertain to the very end. Finally, however, the 
Mus came out victorious, the score being 59-43. 

The line-up was : 



Sigma 


Mu 


"Williams 


Powell 


Royster 


Dougherty 


Hoke 


Barber 


Jensen 


Hill 


Freeland 


N. Lay 


Battle 


Bowne 



March 17 — Basketball 

Mu, 18; Sigma, 9 
On Saturday night, March 17th, a great crowd gathered in the 
Gymnasium to watch a very exciting game which was played by the 
first teams of the Mus and Sigmas. Cheering was heard on all sides 
until the signal was given for the game to begin, and then all became 
quiet. Both teams showed remarkable playing and fine team work 
and the game was a swift one. At the end of the first half the score 



The St. Mary's Muse 123 

was 7 to 3 in favor of the Mus. Each side played well, and for a 
while it was hard to decide which one would finally win out, but 
Helen Brigham proved too much for the Sigmas and the game ended 
with the score 18 to 9 in favor of the Mus. 

This game gave the Basket-ball Championship of 1916-'17 to the 
Mus, they having won all four games played. 

The line-up was as follows : 

Mu Sigma 

Brigham Left Forward Waddell 

McMullan Right Forward Woolford 

Shepherd Center Ravenel 

Glass Right Guard Chavasse 

Burke Left Guard Robinson 

March 24 — Basketball Game 

Mu, 38; Sigma, 23 

In a hard and well played game between the Junior Basket-ball 
teams the Mus defeated the Sigmas with a score of 38-23. 

The game took place in the Gymnasium on Saturday, March 24th, 
at 7 :45 p. m., and it was very well attended. 

At the end of the first half the score was 18-13 in favor of the Mus ; 
in the second half both scores were pushed up by the good playing 
and team work. 

The Junior teams are doing fine work this year and the game was 
good. 

The line-up was as follows: 

Sigma Mu 

Batts Center Wilson 

Lynah, Royster Right Guard Dougherty, Hill 

Jensen, Yorke Left Guard Powell, Barber 

Hoke Right Full N. Lay 

Royster, Jensen Left Full Kern 

Mareli 26 — Athletic Meet 

Sigma, 175 ; Mu, 141 
On Monday afternoon, March 26th, at 2 :30, the Athletic Associa- 
tions held their annual spring meet. A large number of eager spec- 



124 The St. Mary's Muse 

tators were present. The Sigmas were drawn up on one side of the 
field and the Mus on the other, and they cheered enthusiastically. 

The first event was the running high jump, which was won by the 
Sigmas by a score of 58-52. Estelle Ravenel, Sigma, made the 
record jump, 3 ft. 10 in. The previous record was the 4 ft. 1 in. 
jump of Helen Battle, Sigma. The Mus who distinguished them- 
selves in the event were Nellie Rose, who jumped 3 ft. 9 in. ; E. B. 
Lay and Lillias Shepherd, both of whom jumped 3 ft. 8 in. Helen 
Battle, Sigma, also jumped 3 ft. 9 in. and Elizabeth Waddell, Sigma, 
3 ft. 8 in. 

Progressive pitch-ball followed, the Sigmas winning two out of 
three games and the Mus scoring 12 points. This was a very inter- 
esting game, and was eagerly watched by the spectators. 

The basket-ball long distance throw was won by the Mus, the score 
being 49*%2-47%4. The record throw was made by Waddell, Sigma, 
70 ft. 1 in. Brigham, Mu, threw 66 ft. The 1916 record was the 
69 ft. made by Brigham. 

The closest event of all was the running broad jump, and the Sigmas 
won it by a very close score of 39%-39 1 /8. 

Both the relay broad jump and the relay race were won by the 
Sigmas, scoring them 18 points, thus making the total score 175-141 
in their favor. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



125 



The Honor Roll, I9I6-M7 

The Honor Eoll for the Third Quarter (February and March) has 
been announced, as follows : 



FEBRUARY 

Hours 

1. B. Folk, '18 (15) 

2. E. Peel, '17 (13) 

3. H. Morgan, '18 (16) 

4. E. Relyea, '17 (19) 

5. M. Edwards, '18 (20) 

6. M. B. Wilson, '22 (13) 

7. E. Baker, '22 (14) 

8. K. Drane, '18 (18) 

9. M. Dougherty, '22 (14) 

10. M. Lindsay, '20 (16) 

11. K. Alston, '21 (17) 

12. M. Drane, '19 (20) 

MARCH 

Hours 

1. E. Peele, '17 (13) 

2. M. B. Wilson, '22 (13) 

3. B. Folk, '18 (15) 

4. K. Alston, '21 (17) 

5. E. Relyea, '17 (19) 

6. H. Morgan, '18 (16) 

7. M. Dougherty, '22 (14) 

8. A. Robinson, '17 (13) 

9. M. Edwards, '18 (20) 

10. K. Drane, '19 (20) 

11. E. Baker, '22 (14) 

12. M. Drane, '19 (20) 

13. A. Stone, '20 (16) 

14. M. Lindsay, '20 (16) 

15. R. Thorn, '17 (19) 

16. A. Hughes, '18 (18) 

17. A. Latham, '17 (15) 

18. A. Pratt, '18 (19) 



Average 
94.3 
94.3 
93.6 
93.4 
93.3 
92.6 
92.5 
92.4 
92.0 
91.8 
90.8 
90.2 



Average 
94.0 
93.5 
93.2 
92.8 
92.7 
92.7 
92.7 
92.7 
92.6 
92.3 
92.2 
92.0 
91.3 
90.8 
90.6 
90.5 
90.5 
90.4 



126 The St. Mary's Muse 

For President and Country 

"No country has ever pursued the course taken by America in the 
past two years in the firm conviction that war is not the right method 
by which to overturn wrong. This great country has been patient, 
temperate, moderate in the face of insult. On no one has the respon- 
sibility and the anxiety of this time of sufferance borne more heavily 
than upon our President." So Dr. Lay, after dinner on the evening 
of April 3d, spoke in the school room to the patriotic citizens of our 
community from Virginia Lay to "Miss Katie" whom he had called 
upon to assemble there to discuss what we should do to show our sym- 
pathy and our loyalty. He went on to make his proposition that we 
draft a resolution to send to the President through his daughter 
"Nell Wilson" of St. Mary's, 1906-'08, now Mrs. McAdoo. Unani- 
mously the School voiced its approval. And just after, never did the 
students show more genuine feeling than in their full-hearted singing 
of the "Star Spangled Banner." 

At 9 :30 again the school room was crowded with girls now towsled 
after their time of study, but not less enthusiastic. The President 
of the Senior Class and Chairman of the Resolution Committee read : 

April 3, 1917. 
Mrs. Wm. 0. McAdoo, 

1709 Massachusetts Ave., Washington, D. C. 
The students of St. Mary's School have tonight adopted 
unanimously the following resolution: 

We, the girls and teachers of St. Mary's School wish, 
through you, to extend to our President our wholehearted 
sympathy for him in this crisis and to pledge to him and to 
our country our loyal service. 



The St. Maey's Muse 127 

It has been with deepest admiration that we have watched 
and applauded each move that he has made in his wise 
guidance of our country and his firm championship. 

(Signed) 

Alice Latham, 

President Senior Class. 

Katheeine Deane, 

President Junior Class. 

ESTELLE RaVENEE, 

President Sophomore Class. 
Nancy Woolfoed, 
President Freshman Class. 
Nettie C. Daniels, 
President Sub-Freshman Class. 

Eleanob W. Thomas, 

For the Faculty. 
Geoege W. Lay, Rector. 

"It is in order that a motion be made to adopt the resolution." 
The motion made, "Any seconding of the motion ?" The School came 
to their feet clamorously to second it ; hence the adoption was by ris- 
ing vote. And the voters continued to rise. Up they climbed on 
benches and desks and lifted up shouts and yells as some small and 
inadequate outlet for pent-up unexpressed feelings — feelings spring- 
ing from vaguely defined fears of what might soon happen and from 
heightened emotion at the present call to loyalty and patriotism. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



Subscription Price <• *^ * , *, * * , , One Dollar 

Single Copies - ^ - - - - ^ ^ - Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's 
School, Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alurnnag, under the 
editorial management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1916-17. 

Virginia Caroline Allen, '17 Editor-in-Chief 

Elmyra Jenkins, '17 Exchange Editor 

Alice Coiin Latham, '17 ) „ . „ 

L Senior Reporters 

Annie Huske Robinson, '17 J 

Estelle Strozier Ravenel, '18 ) „ 

I Junior Reporters 

Katharine Parker Drane, '18 t 

Emma Hub-gins Badham, '17 Business Manager 

Frances Howe Cheatham, '17 ) 

I Assistant Business Managers 

Sara Louise Wood, '18 I 



EDITORIAL 



St. Mary's vies with the rest of the country in patriotic fervor in 
these stirring days, and definite voice to the feeling was given in the 
meeting of April 3d, which is recorded on the preceding pages. 

The flag has been flying from impromptu flagstaffs on the front of 
East Rock and on the porch of Main Building, and by the time this 
Muse is published the larger flag provided by the spontaneous gift of 
the girls after the meeting of the 3d will be in its place. 

But devotion to the flag is but the symbol of our devoted loyalty to 
our country and her cause. 

The future only can show just what it may be in our power to do, 
but so far as we have power to help we at St. Mary's are ready. 



The St. Mary's Muse 129 



St. Mary's Conference 

The Seventh St. Mary's Conference for the Clergy and Laity of the 
i Carolinas is announced to be held at St. Mary's the first week in June, 
• June 4-10, 1917. At these conferences, which have been usually held 
j the week after Commencement, the buildings are filled with the clergy 
1 and laymen and laywomen, Church workers in the various parishes 
and missions of the four dioceses to which St. Mary's belongs, and 
stimulating and informative programs have been carried out. 

This year the chief speakers will be the Rev. Augustine Elmendorf, 
of the Diocese of Newark, an expert on Social Service who has made 
a deep impression in past conferences ; the Rev. Llewellyn N. Caley 
of Philadelphia, a widely known authority on Sunday School work 
I and methods and co-author of the Church Handbook now in use in 
r our Bible and Sunday Classes at St. Mary's, who is also well known 
I here from past conferences ; the Rev. C. J. Sniffen of the Diocese of 
' Western Massachusetts, whose specialty is the Church in Rural Com- 
munities, and the Rev. Franklin J. Clark of the Church Missions 
j House, who is an authority on Parish Organization, etc. 

The invitations to the conference are sent out early in May, and 
the Rector of St. Mary's would be glad to know of any who would 
I like to have invitations. 

The clergy are asked to send to the Rector of St. Mary's the names 
> of any whom they would like to have invited. 



The Annual Muse 

The preparations for the 1917 Annual Muse are, of course, a topic 
of much interest. Weather conditions were much against the taking 
of the photographs after the holidays, and it was well on towards 
Easter before all were ready, but it is expected that all the trials 
will have been forgotten when the Annual appears on Class Day to 
receive its usual warm greeting. 

The Annual is gotten out by the Muse Club, but edited by the 
Senior Class, and each Senior feels her part of the responsibility. 
The Editor-in-Chief is Virginia C. Allen; Emma Badham is the 
Business Manager ; and Miss Frances Bottum is the illustrator. 



130 The St. Maey's Muse 

The Inter-Society Debates and the Inter-Society Contests 

It will be remembered that last year, with the Shakespearian Cele- 
bration on hand, the annual inter-society debates which had been held 
for the eleven years prior to last year, were omitted and the debate 
energy was put into the Shakespearian Contest — in the writing of 
stories, essays, and verse on the Shakespeare theme. It will also 
be remembered how successful the contest was and what a satisfac- 
tory part of the Shakespeare Celebration it formed. 

This year, with the Seventy-fifth Anniversary of St. Mary's on 
hand, the Anniversary Celebration on May 12th will take the place of 
the celebration of last year, and a St. Mary's Inter-society Contest 
will be a feature. 

The following outline has been offered: 



Seventy-fifth Anniversary Inter-Society Contests 

1. Historical: 

This may take form of: 

a. Formal historical sketch. 

b. Descriptive sketch of significant scenes, e. g., The Opening Day, 

Sewing for the Boys in Gray, Walking-hour in Time of Shawls, 
Carrying Water to Dorms, etc. 

c. Diary or letters describing life at some given time. 
References: Alumnae Muses and early annual Muses and older 

Alumnas themselves. 

2. Fiction: Story with setting St. Mary's. 

3. Poems: 

a. Subject connected with St. Mary's — "The Founder" or "The 
Founders," or "Founders' Day," or "St. Mary's on the Seventy- 
fifth Anniversary," etc., etc. 

b. Half-serious or comic, e. g., chronicle of the week or of the year, 

or on specific subject (succession of classes, etc.) 

4. Songs: 

Suggestions: Matter might be semi-patriotic, old-time. Comic one 
might be song to faculty. 
Additional: Separate society song. Let each society write a song. 
Date limit for submission of articles May 1. 
Public meeting, May 12. 

But the debates will not be abandoned, though, instead of the public 
debates heretofore held, the three inter-society debates will be held 
with only School audiences and more or less informally. 



The St. Mary's Muse 131 

The schedule is: 

Saturday, March 31: Sigma Lambda vs. Alpha Rho. 
Wednesday, April 11: Alpha Rho vs. Epsilon Alpha Pi. 
Wednesday, April 18: Epsilon Alpha Pi vs. Sigma Lambda. 

At the first of this series, held on March 31st, the subject was: 
"Resolved, That St. Mary's should have Student Government with 
Faculty supervision." Katharine Drane and Rubie Thorne repre- 
sented Sigma Lambda and had the negative, while Katharine Darden 
and Sarah Wood represented Alpha Rho and upheld the affirmative. 
Sigma Lambda won. The judges were Miss Lee, Miss Davis, and 
Miss Urquhart. 



The Seventy-fifth Commencement 

With the end of Lent approaching and the spring program even 
more than usually crowded, Commencement seems truly a very little 
ahead. 

Commencement Sunday is May 27th, and the Commencement 
preacher will be the Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, Bishop of East 
Carolina. The Commencement exercises begin with the annual play 
on Saturday evening and end Tuesday morning, May 29th, with the 
graduating exercises. The annual address to the graduates will be 
delivered by Hon. T. W. Bickett, Governor of North Carolina. 

There are fifteen members of the graduating class, as follows : 

Virginia Caroline Allen Hickory, N. C. 

Virginia Pope Allen Goldsboro, N. C. 

Emma Hfdgins Badham Edenton, N. C. 

Frances Horn Cheatham Henderson, N. C. 

Jeanett Faikley Rockingham, N. C. 

Georgia Foster Savannah, Ga. 

Elmyra Jenkins Roanoke Papids, N. C. 

Golda Foy Judd Raleigh, N. C. 

Alice Cohn Latham Plymouth, N. C. 

Eva Irene Peele Williamston, N. C. 

Eleanor Relyea Washington, D. C. 

Annie Huske Robinson Hawkinsville, Ga. 

Nellie Cooper Rose Henderson, N. C. 



132 The St. Maky's Muse 

Rubie Logan Thorn Kingstree, S. C. 

Ethel Carolina Yates Camden, S. C. 

The Commencement Marshals, chosen by the Literary Societies, 
are as follows : 

Alpha Rho — Frances Hillman, Chief; Aline Hughes, Sara Wood. 
Epsilon Alpha Pi — Agnes Pratt, Nancy Woolford. 
Sigma Lambda — Helen Brigham, Ruth Gebert. 



The Certificate Recitals of 1917 

The Diploma and Certificate Recitals of the candidates for awards 
in the Music and Elocution Departments are always an interesting 
part of the post-Easter program. They are given on Monday even- 
ings will this season require each Monday from April 16th. 

This is the tentative program : 



Monday, April 16 
Monday, April 23 
Monday, April 30 



Miss Katharine Drane, Piano. 

Miss Martha Wright, Piano (diploma recital). 

Miss Sarah Rawlings, Piano. 
Monday, May 7: Miss Aline Hughes, Elocution. 
Monday, May 14: Miss Martha Wright, Voice. 



Vacant Scholarships 

It so happens that both of the endowed "full scholarships" at St. 
Mary's — the Smedes and the Murchison — will be vacant through 
graduation for the session that begins next September. 

The David R. Murchison Scholarship was established in 1903 by 
Miss Lucile Murchison of Wilmington, a St. Mary's girl, in memory 
of her father. 

The Smedes Memorial (Alumna?) Scholarship was established by 
the alumna in 1906. 

Both of these scholarships are awarded by competitive examination 
and must be held on merit, and the holders of both since they were 
established have made records of which St. Mary's is proud. 

The following official announcement of the vacancies has been 

issued from the School : 

There will be vacancies in two endowed scholarships in St. Mary's School 
for the session beginning September 20th next, and a competitive examination 



The St. Maey's Muse 133 

of candidates for these scholarships will he held in the cities and towns of 
North and South Carolina in which there may be qualified candidates on 
May 1st and 2d next. 

(1) The Smedes Memorial (Alumnae) Scholarship is worth $270 a year, 
and must be held by a resident of North or South Carolina. 

(2) The David R. Murchison Scholarship is worth $300 a year, and must 
be held by a resident of the Diocese of East Carolina, which includes the 
eastern portion of the State of North Carolina. 

Under the deeds of gift these scholarships are awarded as the result of 
competitive examination to the candidate who, having showed herself quali- 
fied in other respects, passes the best examination. 

In order to be qualified to hold either scholarship the girl must be at least 
14 years of age, of good character, and prepared to enter the Freshman Class 
at St. Mary's School. She need not be an Episcopalian. In order to pass the 
examination she must make at least 75 per cent on each of the five subjects in 
which the examination is held. 

The appointees to the scholarships, if they maintain a satisfactory record, 
will hold the scholarships from year to year until graduation. They are re- 
quired to take the regular "college course" at St. Mary's. 

The School reserves the right not to appoint any candidate whose general 
average in the examinations is not satisfactory. 

In addition to these competitive scholarships there are other scholarships at 
St. Mary's which are non-competitive and will be open and filled by appoint- 
ment for the coming session. But in order to qualify for any scholarship a 
candidate must pass examinations similar to those given in the competitive 
examination,. Candidates who pass the competitive examinations in May will 
by so doing qualify themselves for appointment to any scholarships which 
may be available. 

The examination includes five subjects: English, History, Science, Mathe- 
matics, and one foreign language (Latin or French or German), and covers 
the amount of each subject required for admission to the Freshman Class at 
St. Mary's. 

Two hours is allowed for the examination in each subject, and the five 
subjects may be taken in one day or parts of the two days. 

Wherever there are qualified candidates in North or South Carolina, and 
arrangements for the conduct of the examination can be made with the 
Episcopal Rector or with the authorities of the local schools, the examination 
will be held. 

Where it is possible, it is desired that the examination be conducted under 
the joint auspices of the Episcopal Rector and the local school authorities. 

Blank forms for the use of candidates and examiners are issued from the 
school on request, and further details arranged on receipt of request for ex- 
amination. 

The examination papers will be prepared at St. Mary's and forwarded to 
the examiners at each point in time for the examination to be held on the 
days appointed. The papers of the candidates will be returned by the ex- 
aminers to St. Mary's for grading. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank, Alumna? Editor 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

Honorary Vice-Presidents - / Mr3 " L McK " P ittin ser, Raleigh. 

I Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 
President - Mrs. W. E. Lindsay, Spartanburg, S. C. 

Vice-President - Mrs A. L. Baker, Raleigh 

Secretary - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



Tt)e May I2tf} CelebratioQ 

The chief speakers for the Seventy-fifth Anniversary Celebration 
will be Miss Emilie W. McVea, St. Mary's, '84, President of Sweet- 
brier College, and Dr. W. S. Currell, President of the University of 
South Carolina. 

There is every indication that the Alumnse Reunion will be success- 
ful in every way, and an effort is being made to have a number of 
class reunions, which also promise to be very well attended. 

The general program is as follows : 

Friday, May 11th 

8:30 P. M. Anniversary Exercises in the Auditorium. Addresses by Miss 
McVea and Dr. Correll. 

Saturday, May 12th 
8:00 A. M. Celebration of the Holy Communion in the Chapel (with music). 
9:00 A. M. Breakfast. 
10:30 A. M. Student Exercises in the Auditorium. 

2:00 P. M. Anniversary Luncheon in Clement Hall in honor of tha Alumnse, 

with brief after-dinner speeches. 
5:00 P. M. Anniversary Festival in the Grove, with the Students and 

Alumnae participating. 

8:30 P. M. Student Entertainment in Auditorium in honor of the visitors. 
The Chorus Class in Gilbert and Sullivan's opera, "Patience." 

The visiting Alumnse will be the guests of the School during the Celebra- 
tion, and will be entertained in the School buildings. 



The St. Mary's Muse 135 

The Best Part of It 

The effort to raise five million dollars to set in motion the Church 
Pension System resulted in subscriptions of nearly seven millions. 
This is a considerable sum of money. It was a big thing to begin 
and a tremendous thing to accomplish in such a full and satisfactory 
measure. But the best part of it all is not the big pile of dollars. 
Better than that was the courage and the vision, and best of all was 
the fact that this American Church got together and did something 
together and attained the accomplishment of a united purpose. 

A prominent leader once proposed a great scheme with the condi- 
tion, "If a thousand congregations will agree to do this, — " and then 
he stopped to ask himself the disconcerting question, "When did a 
thousand parishes ever agree to do anything ?" In the matter of the 
Church Pension Fund, however, many times a thousand congrega- 
tions agreed to do something, and it was done. 

Let us repeat this in another form. When we consider the amount 
that Bishop Lawrence has raised and then remember that there are 
a million communicants in the Episcopal Church in the United 
States, we see that it means only an average of a dollar a year per 
capita for five years to make five million dollars. As a cold financial 
proposition on a per capita basis it looks small. But the fine big 
part of it all is that the whole Church united and concentrated its 
energies in one great achievement — truly a noble expression of the 
unity of the Spirit. 

Let us now consider the $250,000 fund for St. Mary's School. 
There are twenty-five thousand communicants of the Church in the 
Carolina Dioceses. They own and, through the Trustees, control this 
School. In a popular canvass such as we are conducting for sub- 
scriptions of a thousand dollars and downward, an average of two 
dollars per capita a year for five years would raise the fund. As a 
mere mathematical proposition, that looks easy. But the big thing 
is to get together and make this average an accomplishment. A 
thoroughgoing and united purpose and effort will carry through this 
plan. The man who can give a thousand dollars must do his part, 



136 The St. Mary's Muse 



and the woman who can give but a dollar must do her share. It must 
be a united movement. Nothing short of this can succeed. 

Let us remember that no four dioceses of this Church have ever 
before undertaken just such a proposition for education. Big things 
inspire us to do our best. A big purpose inspires him who can do 
little as well as the man who can do much. As with the Pension 
Fund, so with the St. Mary's Fund : unity of purpose and effort and 
unanimous cooperation surely spell success. 

Francis M. Osborne, 
Special Representative of the Trustees of St. Mary's School. 



The Object of the $250,000 Fund 

The Iiev. Francis M. Osborne, Special Representative of the Trus- 
tees, in charge of the campaign for the fund, has issued a little four- 
page leaflet giving some salient information with reference to the 
importance of the campaign. 

The leaflet says on the cover : "The Trustees of St. Mary's School 
having undertaken to secure a quarter of a million dollars for this 
institution, this bulletin is prepared to set forth the need for such a 
fund and the plan for raising it." 

The leaflet says : 

Object. 

Building Debt % 40,000.00 

Improvements and New Buildings 100,000.00 

Permanent Endowment 100,000.00 

Expense of Campaign 10,000.00 

Total $250,000.00 

These figures indicate the use to which the proposed fund is to he put: (1) 
A few years ago the Trustees erected new buildings at a cost of $80,000. 
These buildings have been only half paid for. The payment of this building 
debt will relieve the school of an annual interest charge of $2,400, and this 
amount will then go into the improvement of the school. (2) One hundred 
thousand dollars will be spent in overhauling the old buildings and adding 
new ones. This will enlarge the capacity of the school to 200 and make it 
up to date in every particular and second to none in its physical equipment. 
(3) One hundred thousand dollars will be set aside for permanent endow- 
ment. This will enable the school to pay the best teachers the salaries they 
demand and to meet the increased cost of material things without lowering 



The St. Mary's Muse 137 

the high standard of scholarship and efficiency which every one expects and 
demands of St. Mary's. (4) The estimated expense of a two years' cam- 
paign, which will amount to about $10,000, has been practically taken care of 
by the subscriptions of the Trustees. 

The $250,000 fund, then, is only enough to meet the absolute requirements 
of the situation and maintain St. Mary's ideal — not a cheap school, but the 
best school of moderate cost and equal to the average ability of the people in 
this section of the country. 

Owners and Trustees 

St. Mary's School is the property of the Episcopal Church in the Dioceses 
of North Carolina, East Carolina, South Carolina and Asheville. The conven- 
tions of these dioceses elect the Trustees, who have full authority in ordering 
the affairs of the school. They are the agents of those who own the school — 
the members of this church in the Carolinas. 

The school has none other aim than the single purpose of serving the 
church and the Commonwealth by maintaining the highest type of Christian 
education and culture. Three generations of Christian women furnish a 
definite measure of the fulfillment of her aim. 

A Profitable Investment 

Less than 20 years ago the Episcopal Church bought the St. Mary's property 
for $50,000. Since then, through two generous legacies and the earnings of 
the school, the plant has been improved and enlarged. Today the buildings 
and grounds are worth $250,000. To this increase the church generally has 
not contributed. The debt of $40,000 is not a deficit on current expenses due 
to mismanagement or extravagance, but a building debt voluntarily assumed 
by the Trustees to meet the demand for larger accommodations. In fact, the 
school has in 20 years paid out of its earnings for equipment and buildings 
over $100,000, or twice the original cost of the property. So it may be seen 
that since St. Mary's School was purchased by this church it has not been a 
financial burden to the church. On the other hand, the church has never 
made a better investment from a business point of view, to say nothing of the 
educational and missionary value of the institution. Seventy-five years of 
service to the church and the education of women merit appreciation, and 
demand recognition and loyal support. 

Ownership entails responsibility. If we oion St. Mary's School we must 
take care of it or we should sell it or give it away. 

The Plan of Campaign 

Two ways have been proposed for raising the fund. One plan is based on 
the expectation of receiving large gifts from wealthy individuals. The other 
plan is to ask the 25,000 Episcopalians and friends of education in North and 
South Carolina to unite in a general co-operative and organized movement to 
do all in their power by a popular canvass. While the Trustees of St. Mary's 
School would welcome and do hope for some large gifts and legacies, yet they 
do not propose to wait for these. So they have launched a popular canvass 
for gifts of $1,000 and less, payable in annual installments covering a period 



138 The St. Mary's Muse 



of five years or less. The Special Representative of the Board of Trustees 
will devote two years to organizing and leading the movement. His business 
is to make effective the wishes of those who own the school and churchmen, 
alumnae and friends of the school will help the cause by suggestion and co- 
operation in their respective parts in this great campaign. 

Francis M. Osborne, 
Special Representative of the Board of Trustees St. Mary's School. 



St. Mary's Girls in New YorK 

The following article from the Neius and Observer of March 4th, 
there headed "Raleigh Girls in New York," is of special interest, in- 
asmuch as each of the young ladies is a St. Mary's girl : 

Raleigh Girls in New York 

Raleigh girls not only have the reputation for beauty and attractiveness. 
They also have ambition, as one may see for one's self from the story of their 
activities. 

To begin with, four of Raleigh's girls are studying in New York, all of them 
making names and careers for themselves. 

Miss Emilie Rose Knox, who is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. A. W. Knox, is 
rising steadily upward in the musical world. Miss Knox's subject is the 
violin. She is one of the famous Kneisel's pupils, who is considered the 
greatest violin player in the United States. Miss Knox was the first of 500 
who played for and was accepted by Kneisel. A greater honor yet is that 
Kneisel only takes ten pupils in New York, and Miss Knox is one of these 
lucky ten. She also played before Damrosch, who said he would take her as 
a student if Kneisel did not. Before going to New York Miss Knox studied 
for two years under Caesar Kaspar in "Washington and under Tirenbelli in 
Cincinnati for four years. Miss Knox is working in the hopes of getting con- 
stant work with Kneisel. 

Miss Patsey Harry Smith, the daughter of Mrs. Fannie Smith, is meeting 
with great success also. Miss Smith is studying in the School of Fine and 
Applied Arts. Her subject is illustrated advertising. Miss Smith has re- 
cently had some of her original designs on exhibition at the Three Arts Club 
which attracted the attention of some of the foremost critics of New York. 

Miss Adelyn Barbee, who is the niece of Mr. Claude Barbee, is also coming 
to the front. Miss Barbee is taking the regular academic course, with piano 
as a specialty, at the Finch School. Miss Barbee graduated in piano under 
Mr. R. Blinn Owen at St. Mary's. He strongly advised her to become a concert 
player. Her teachers in New York are advising it also, as Miss Barbee has 
unusual talent and all the requirements of a concert player. She is doing 
splendid work. Miss Barbee has received honors from both the faculty and 
student body at Finch. . Inasmuch as the faculty made her a member of the 
student council and the students made her president of the junior class. 



The St. Mary's Muse 139 

Miss Elizabeth Thompson is another one of Raleigh's talented young girls 
who is studying in New York. Miss Thompson is the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. John W. Thompson. Miss Thompson is taking a course in interior deco- 
rating and architecture at the School of Fine and Applied Arts. She had one 
year in this course while a student at Sweet Briar College, and upon receiving 
her diploma from the School of Fine and Applied Arts next year she hopes to 
enter Les Beaux Arts in Paris, which is the ultimate goal of all ambitious 
young art students. Miss Thompson has already met with notable success in 
her work, having been associated last summer with Mr. James A. Salter, the 
well-known architect of this city, and having among other things drawn the 
interior plans for the beautiful home of Mr. Graham H. Andrews, now being 
erected. 



Alumnae Weddings 



Erwin - Barton : On Saturday, March 10, at Live Oak, Fla., Miss Haffye 
Louise Barton (S. M. S. 1914-15) and Mr. "William Allen Erwin, Jr., of 
West Durham, N. C. At home, Duke, N. C. 

Porter- Spkuill: On Thursday, April 12, at the Church of the Good Shep- 
herd, Rocky Mount, N. C, Miss Martha Byrd Spruill (S. M. S. 1907-10) 
and Dr. William Branch Porter. At home, Richmond, Va. 

Forehand -Conger: On Thursday, April 19, in St. Paul's Church, Edenton, 
N. C, Miss Mary Louise Conger (S. M. S. 1911-12) and Mr. Elton Fore- 
hand. At home, Edenton, N. C. 

Shields - Norman : On Wednesday, April 18, in St. Mark's Church, Halifax, 
N. C, Miss Jane Whittle Norman (S. M. S. 1915-16) and Mr. Leon Grady 
Shields. 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 

2C6-10 MASONIC TEMPLE 



Success in the Campaign for the Raising of the $250,000 
Fund to pay off the debt and provide additional new build- 
ings, and the beginning of an Endowment Fund is of the 
utmost importance to St. Mary's. 

Think of it, talk of it, and help in every way you can. 



B. W. JONES 

The 
Best in 
Groceries 

Phones 667-668 528 Hillsboro Street 



'You get them when promised" 



Hoticm s Studio 

Masonic Temple 



'Workers in Artistic Photography" 



Advertisements 



Stationery, College Linen, Pennants, 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 



Bell Phone 135 



RALEIGH, N. C 



JOHNSON & BROUGHTON 
Good Tilings to Eat 

122 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

Coal, Wood, Ice, Brick 



; 






122 Fayetteville Street 



Raleigh, N. C. 



H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 



CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Lieht and 
Power and G::s 

1376 -BOTH PHONES— 1377 



WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



S. GLASS 



The Ladies' Store 



Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 0. 



Wm. Heller 

THE FOOTERY SHOP 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THE ALUMNiE ARE REMINDED 
that a complete Alumna; Register, which should include 
information about all past students of St. Mary's, is 
now in course of preparation for publication. 

Information for this Register is solicited. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 

Safe, Secure, and Successful 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

R. S. BUSBEE. Secretary 

Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Cornrmnif"! Rn..re-ontpd Bond'ng Solicited 

Charles E. Johnson, Jr., 

RALEIGH, N. G. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 



Hafapette 



A '"afe which invites the pntronaere of 
ladies. The srirls of St. Mary's will enjoy 
the beauty and convenience of our modern, 
well-appointed dining- place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

Raleigh, N. C. 

THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 

GOLF, TENNIS, AND SPORTING GOODS 



MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
104 EAST HARGETT ST. Bell Phone 719 



Advertisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STORE 

Phones 228 



HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

The Big Hardware Men Raleigh, N. C. 



Base Balls, Basket Balls 
Tennis and Sporting Goods 



Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 
12 W. Hargett St. 

RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 



Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 

Phone 529 



DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 

T. F. BROCK WELL 

All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies. 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 



Subscriptions for the monthly Muse are very acc3ptable 
at all times One dollar will bring the ten cop us of the 
Muse published next after its recJpt. 



PERRY'S ART STORE 

R Wilminsrton Rt 


MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 
VISITING CARDS 

CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY ENGRAVED 


California Fruit Store. HI Fayetteville St.. Raleigh 

Fancy fruits and pure ice cream. Best equipped and most 
Shiiitaiy ice cream factory in the state. Our cream is the 
•Quality Kind." Send us ynur orders California Fruit 
store. Ill Fayetteville St.. Vurnakes 4 Co.. Props.. Raleigh. 

BATES-AR KINGTON & COMPANY 
PURE FOOD GROCERIES 


HAYES & HALL— STUDIO 


Send for samples and prices 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 


Edwards & Broughton Printing 
Company 


J. L OQuinn & Co. 

Florists 


L. SCHWARTZ 

RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 


Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 



Raleigh's Leading and Largest Hoiel 



dinners and Banquets a Specialty 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Co., Proprietors 



2 loIly & W/nne Jewelr/ Co. 



COLLJGE 
JEWELRY 



128 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



WATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. 

5 Picture Frames and Window Shades. 

SHOES! WHOSE? 
BERNARD L. CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street 

GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 



YOUNG & HUGHES 



Plumbers 

Stenm Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 



S. Wilmington Street 



C. D. ARTHUR City Market 
FISH AND OYSTERS 

ELLINGTONS ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N C. 

College Pennants, Pillows, Pictures, 
Frames, Novelties 

P.OYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 

Made Fresh Every Day 



SOUTHER 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tick- 
ets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, as well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
trip to any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. They will 
gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the 
cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you 



H. F. CARY, General Pass. Agent, 
Washington, D. C. 



J. 0. JONES, Traveling Pass. Agent, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements 



St. Mary's Girls Always Welcome at 

Hudson-Belk Company 

Full line of Ready-to-wear, Hosiery, Gloves, Furnishings, Dry 
Goods, Shoes, Toilet Goods, Ribbons and Laces 



ESTABLISHED 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

M. ROSENTHAL & COMPANY 

GROCERS 

Wilmington and Hargett Streets 



KING-CROVt ELL'S DRUG STORE 
AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Cor. Fayetteville and Hargett Sts. 



THOMAS A PARTIN COMPANY 

Rn'ei-li N 

Specialty of Ladies' Ready-to-Wear Gar- 
ments and Gossard's Lace Front Corsets 



THE SCHOOL AUTHORITIES 

are at all times pleased to send full information 
about St. Mary's on request without charge. 
We should like every one interested to have at 
least copies of 

The Illustrated Catalogue, 

The Books of Views, 

The Song Book. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



BOYLAN-PEARGE 

COMPANY 

The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 



1 




Advertisements 




*• e. r-^ r«-i E S" 






1 

I 


r^VRENCli 


> 

J Exclusive 
c 1 nllinery 


Raleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' 
and Misses' Ready-to-Wear Garments 

TEN PER CENT OFF TO COLLEGE GIRLS 
KAPLAN BROS. COMPANY 


Rl 




RALEIGH M.C 




Fayetteville Street 


W. E. BONNER 
Shoe Repairing' 


ORDER YOUR CUT FLOWERS 

FROM 


s 


J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Phone 149 


SEE 

Herbert Rosenthal 

FOR REAL SHOES 


I 






Come to the 75th Anniversary 
May 12th 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 



ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS' 



Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



NORFOLK " e ^ l ^rn 



GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 



Electric Lighted 'Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 



Fast Schedule, Best Service 



Double Daily Express Service 



H. S. LEARD, G. P. A. 

Norfolk, Va. 



J. F. MITCHELL, T. P. A. 

RA.LEIC1I, N. C. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 
i 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 



St. Marts School 



RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 



75th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 15, 1916. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGAN JANUARY 25, 1917. 



St. Mary's 

f offers 

instruction 

§in these 
Departments 



1. THE COLLEGE 

2. THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

3. THE ART DEPARTMENT 

k. THE ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 

5. THE HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 

6. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL 

7. THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



In 1916-17 are enrolled 275 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 
Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 
Dormitories. 
Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 
slight to the Scholastic training. 
For catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, D. C. L., 

Rector. 

EDWARDS & BROUGHTON PRINTING CO., RALEIGH N. C. 



£>t jffflarp'g jffluse 

mt M. c. 



ffre-Commemement Mumbtv 

>, 1917 



The St. Mary's Muse 

PRE-COMMENCEMENT NUMBER 

Vol. XXI May, 1917 No. 6 



75th CommeQcement Progran) 
1917 

Saturday, May 26 

8:30 p. m. — Annual Recital of the Elocution Department in the 
Auditorium. 

Sunday, May 27 

11 :00 a. m. — Commencement Sermon in the Chapel by the Rt. Rev. 
Thos. C. Darst, D.D., Bishop of East Carolina. 
5:00 p. m. — Alumna? Service in the Chapel. 

Monday, May 28 

11 :00 a. m. — Class Day Exercises in the Grove. 

3 :00 p. m. — Annual Exhibit of the Art Department in the Studio. 

4:30 p. m. — Annual Alumna? Meeting in the Parlor. 

8 :30 p. m. — Annual Concert in the Auditorium. 

9 :30 p. m. — Rector's Reception in the Parlor. 

Tuesday, May 29 

11 :00 a. m. — Graduating Exercises in the Auditorium. 

Annual Address by Hon. T. W. Bickett, Governor 

of North Carolina. 
Closing Exercises in the Chapel. 



142 The St. Mary's Muse 



Medway, an Old Plantation of Long Ago 



Josephine Myers, '19. 

"Isn't it wonderful to be off at last ? Hope we've got enough films 
to last us; and, Harry, thank goodness you did not forget your 
guitar." 

It was a bright morning in December and we had just left the 
Yacht Club wharf on board the "Marjorie" for a house party up the 
river. The harbor stretched out blue and peaceful in the bright 
morning sunshine, the only waves being little white caps slashed 
against the walls of the high battery. The tall steeples of St. 
Michael's and St. Philip's, high above the trees and roofs, glistened 
white in the sunlight. 

Past the wharves covered with bales of cotton and singing darkies ; 
past the custom house wharf, opposite which was anchored a huge 
rusty, foreign-looking ship, the German "Liebensfel," lately sunk, 
nobody knows why or by whom; past the Navy Yard with its dry 
dock, huge battleships and smaller submarine and torpedo boats. 

Now we were getting into the real country. On both sides of the 
river the trees and underbrush were thick, with only here and there a 
little cabin or a plantation house high up on the bank. Sometimes 
up a wide cove we would get a glimpse of rice fields with thousands 
of rice birds hovering overhead. 

All the while we were comfortable in deck chairs, singing to the 
accompaniment of guitar, ukuleles, -and mandolins. We would not 
get to "Medway" until that afternoon, so we were amusing ourselves 
in the meantime. This was the first time that some of us had ever 
been to "Medway," and the others were entertaining and terrifying 
us with stories of "Jonah's biscuits" and the many ghosts which were 
supposed to inhabit the place. 

Our music and conversation were interrupted by one of the cabin 
boys, who was sent up to tell "Miss Polly, Jake say hurry down ; we 
gwine have coots for dinner." Well, we did hurry down and found 
delicious things awaiting us, the nicest thing of all being the "coots." 
ISTow perhaps you do not know what "coots" are, and the only time we 



The St. Mary's Muse 143 

ever have them is on boat trips or on plantation house parties, because 
they are a kind of rice bird found only around marshy places and 
rice fields. 

The time passed quickly, and just as the sun was setting we came 
in sight of "Medway." "Med way," named after an old English 
manor house, is built on a bluff overlooking the river. The bluff 
slopes gradually down to the water's edge, and at the end of a long 
avenue of oak trees covered with gray hanging moss can be seen the 
big red brick house. 

Such a crowd of black people as were gathered at the little wharf 
to greet us. Old Uncle Jonah, beaming all over himself, bowing and 
scraping as if he were the host, Aunt Cindy, with her loudest red 
bandanna handkerchief tied around her head "makin' a courtesy," 
and a crowd of curious darkeys, old and young, all crowding around 
anxious for a glimpse of the city people. Even the hunting dogs 
barked and yelped as if they were glad to see us. 

What a hustle and a bustle to get us and our belongings up to the 
"big house," as Aunt Cindy called it. "She an all dose oder niggahs 
been expectin' de crowd eber since de week befo' when Marse done 
tole 'em dey wus comin'." Every one was anxious to help us; we 
were hardly allowed to carry our own handkerchiefs. One little 
darkey came rushing up to me and said, "Ma done sent me to tote de 
ladies lil' suit-case." It happened to be my camera, but I let him 
carry it, much to his delight. 

Up at the house we found a glorious supper awaiting us in the 
dining-room, which was only lighted by the flames of the huge fire. 
The supper, which consisted of hominy, venison, killed in the forest 
near by, more "coots," Aunt Cindy's batter cakes and Uncle Jonah's 
biscuits, which were renowned even in the city, was a repast fit for 
a king. If you do not believe me, you just ought to have tasted it ! 

After supper the most renowned "jiggers" for miles around came 
to jig for us while our men from the boat played accordions, guitars, 
and a musical instrument peculiar to them, which consisted of two 
sticks and which was supposed to take the place of a drum. Anyhow 
it was good music and good jigging! 

Now, "Medway" was built when the first settlers came to South 



144 The St. Mary's Muse 



Carolina. The bricks had been brought over from England, and the 
nails, too, which were hand made. Once when some plastering had 
fallen down away up in the attic, some one had found a round piece 
of metal with a number engraved on it and "house servant of Land- 
grave " so the house had probably been built by slaves. 

All these old plantations have their family burying grounds or 
graveyards, and "Medway" happened to have an especially interest- 
ing one as "Landgrave — " and his three wives were buried there. 
At twelve o'clock that night we set out on a visit to the spooky place. 
The moonlight shone pale and ghostly on the gray moss which drooped 
low from the old oak trees. As we passed the rose garden, planted a 
hundred years ago, we imagined that we could see the ghost of a 
beautiful girl with powdered hair walking with her lover. We made 
our way through a swampy place overgrown with weeds to the grave- 
yard. Every one became subdued and quiet, for there in the moon- 
light were four tombstones: "Here lies Landgrave," "Here lies His 
Eirst Wife, Margaret," "Here lies His Second Wife, Ann," "Here 
lies His Third Wife, Harriet." The tombstones were covered over 
with tangled vines and Virginia creeper, and grass grew up over 
everything. Trees and bushes, dark and mysterious in the shadowy 
moonlight, hemmed in and formed a natural screen on three sides of 
this ghostly graveyard. 

There was a story that oftentimes the Landgrave's three wives 
would rise from their graves and fight over their husband. One of 
the darkeys declared that early one morning he had seen strands of 
three different colored hair strewn over the graves, but, "no suh, I 
ain't tech 'em, 'cause I don' want ter be visited by no ghost." 

As we stood there quietly in the moonlight, with the ghostly tomb- 
stones before us, there was a sound of heavy breathing in the bushes 
at the back of the graveyard — the breathing seemed to be coming 
nearer and nearer. With one impulse we all turned and fled. Right 
through the swampy place, through the rose garden, across the lawn 
we ran, never stopping until we reached the shelter of the house and 
the great fire which welcomed us into the comfort and safety of the 
dining-room. 

In the warm firelight we became braver and begged for ghost 



The St. Mary's Muse 145 

, j 

stories from the present owner of the house. Far into the gray morn- 
ing light we sat listening to how "Landgrave — " on a certain night 
in each month walked down the wide front stair with his pipe in his 
mouth puffing away; how in a certain upstairs room a lady in white 
would sit all night at her window, overlooking the forest at the back, 
watching and waiting for her lover who had never come back from 
the hunt; how in one room was a little old mahogany table stained 
with blood, where a baby had been killed while sleeping, by one of 
the hunting dogs which had gotten into the house. 

With our minds full of these horrible stories, with creepy feelings 
and occasional shrieks, we took our candles and crept up the creaking 
stairs, to shiver and shake a while before going to bed, on this our 
first night at "Medway." 



Only a Girl 



Aline Hughes, '18. 

Margarita had been living with her adopted mother and father 
for six years, ever since she was eight years old, and during this time 
her love for them had never waned. Before the eighth year she had 
lived in ISTew York slums with her own mother, who had pathetically 
striven "to mak-a da mon' " for her little girl until her struggle in 
the sweat-shops ended, and Margarita was left alone. How she 
clapped her little hands and how her eyes danced when she first 
caught sight of her mother's Dreamland, the country. ISTever should 
she cease to love dear Mr. and Mrs. Brauen for having rescued her 
and brought her to such a lovely place as their modest little country 
home. There was one other love, however, that kept pace with her 
love for her foster-parents, and this was her absolute devotion to her 
dear, dear America. It was this feeling that helped her to act as 
she did. 

She was startled into consciousness one night by the splashing of 
fain in her face, the stinging drops being blown in by a wild March 
wind. After banging down the window she was halted in the midst 
of a spring into bed. Was some one in the house ? Where did that 



146 The St. Mary's Muse 

peculiar noise come from? It sounded as if a number of people 
were talking. Her first impulse was to call "Father B." in the next 
room. But no, she must go very quietly and tell him. Snatching up 
her warm, dark wrapper she cautiously fumbled to the door and 
slipped into the big front room. Suddenly she stopped. There was 
no one in the room. The clock said three a. m. and the beds had evi- 
dently been left in great haste. What was the trouble? After a 
moment's indecision she groped her way into the hall, and step by 
step crept noiselessly downstairs, and on down the dark, never used 
cellar stairs to where a tiny beam of light seemed to beckon from 
under the door. What did it mean ? Was it right to listen ? Some- 
thing seemed to urge her on, and in the shadow of a cement column 
she crouched close to the door. 

As she became accustomed to the sounds, the voices became more 
distinct. She recognized the voices of Mr. and Mrs. Brauen and of 
their close friends, the Freunders, but the voices of other men were 
strange. What was that ? "Dynamite!" Hush! "Thursday, the 
railroad bridge near L. ! Brauen, you will light the fuse on the 
second so that we can all act, and — " but Margarita heard no more. 
In a daze of wonder she dropped limply to the floor, her brown eyes 
staring into the darkness. A stirring behind the door aroused her, 
and with a shudder she bounded wildly, blindly, up the stairs to 
her own little room. She sprang into bed and lay still with tightly 
closed eyes, vitally conscious of the steps on the stairs, and finally in 
her room stopping by her bed. With great difficulty Margarita kept 
her eyes shut until her mother left the room, then she sat up in bed, 
her mind one jumble of questions. Like a moving picture sign the 
words flashed in the darkness, "Between Home and Country." She 
must prevent the disaster, but how? Could she betray her mother 
and father ? And yet those people on the train Thursday must be 
saved. 

The next day some soldiers, engaged in a game of cards in the 
camp near by, were stopped in their game by a small weak voice. 

"Please, where is General Carton?" 

One soldier began to laugh, but another, with an elaborate bow, 



The St. Maey's Muse 147 

offered to show the little girl to the general's tent and waited outside, 
wondering at the length of time she was staying. 

Inside the big brown tent the gruff old general was finally saying, 
"Little girl, do you know that by refusing to give the names of these 
conspirators you may be considered partly concerned in this plot ? 
You had better change your mind," he growled out. "Won't you 
give the names V 

The brown eyes could no longer hold back the tears, and Mar- 
garita, for she it was, covering her face with her hands, shook with 
sobs. 

Now the general had once had a little brown-eyed girl who had 
not acted in a very brave way, and in memory of those other brown 
eyes he took the sobbing little figure on his knees and comforted her. 

"Margarita," he said, and his voice was no longer gruff, "you have 
given us very valuable information as to the hour and character of 
the plot, but, dear child, we have long been watching that couple. If 
it were not for you I would chuck them straightway into prison, but 
they must have some good in them to have inspired such faithful love. 
We will see that they are safely stowed away for your sake. Then 
if a certain little girl named Margarita will come home with a lonely 
old man he will try to make her the happiest as well as the bravest 
little maid in the United States." 

As the bugles blew the "call to arms" Margarita threw her arms 
about the gray-haired general's neck and gave him a kiss. 



SCHOOL NEWS 



April 12 — Raleigh Patriotic Mass Meeting 

The evening of Thursday, April 12th, was the time appointed for 
a great patriotic rally for all the people of Raleigh, young and old, 
white and black. The day had been selected on account of the visit 
of the "Knoxville Boosters," a train-load of Knoxville business men 
who starting out on a boosting trip in the neighboring States on the 
outbreak of war had turned their trip into a patriotic tour. 



148 The St. Mary's Muse 

We attended the rally in the City Auditorium in full numbers, 
and it was a most inspiring sight to see the procession pouring into 
the large auditorium until it was finally crowded with more than 
5,000 people. There was a great deal of enthusiasm and the speeches 
and music were much enjoyed by all. Soldiers, sailors, Boy Scouts, 
Confederate veterans, Red Cross nurses, students and teachers of 
the various schools and colleges, and a vast array of citizens of all 
types made up the throng and vied with each other in showing their 
Americanism. 

April 14 — The National Tea 

Due to the inclemency of the weather the entertainment of April 
14th became an indoor affair instead of being held in the grove. It 
was held under the porch of Main Building, which was very prettily 
decorated, and was a decided success. A profusion of flags and red, 
white, and blue streamers made up the decoration, the tables having 
small flag doilies as centerpieces. Pillows were scattered around in 
windows and made cozy seats for those who were not so fortunate as 
to get to the tables. The color scheme was relieved by potted plants. 
The "old dining-room" adjoining was also decorated in the national 
colors and was used for dancing. Chicken salad with tiny Uncle Sam 
hats as favors, sandwiches and ice cream were the refreshments. 

April 21 — Sleight-of-Hand Performance 

Prof. A. F. Bo wen, of ISTorth Carolina State College, in a sleight- 
of-hand performance, assisted by "St. Mary's talent" in a musical 
program, was the attraction offered by the Muse Club on Saturday 
night, April 21st. The Auditorium was well filled with an enthusi- 
astic audience of old girls who had seen Mr. Bowen's accomplish- 
ments before and knew their merit, and new girls to whom wind of 
it had come and made curious. 

The program opened with a marvelous production of money from 
all sorts of places, and various other equally wonderful tricks. Fol- 
lowing Professor Bowen, the St. Mary's Glee Club played extremely 
well a medley of popular songs, and then Martha Wright in Hawaiian 
costume, sang in her inimitable way some favorite Hawaiian songs 



The St. Mary's Muse 149 

with ukulele accompaniment. Mr. Bowen gave the second part of his 
performance, amusing and clever as the first and fully enjoyed by the 
onlookers, and Lillias Shepherd followed with two beautiful dances 
closing the set program. 

Suddenly the lights in the pit were extinguished and the curtain 
rose on an immoble statue of Liberty against a background of stars 
and stripes. The effect was startling and inspiring, and with one 
accord the audience rose to sing the National Air. 

April 25— Miss Stone's Talk 

Miss Florence Stone, sister of Mr. W. E. Stone of the Faculty, 
whose home has been for so many years in Athens, Greece, gave one 
of her interesting lantern lectures on Wednesday evening, April 25th, 
in our Auditorium. 

Miss Stone has a charming personality and has been warmly 
greeted on previous occasions at St. Mary's, but this lecture was 
especially interesting on account of the war situation. She talked 
on various matters of interest in Greece, and the evening was a very 
pleasant one. 

April 26 — Annual Exhibition of the Physical Training 

Department 

The annual exhibit of the Physical Training Department, under 
the very efficient direction of Miss Mabel Barton, was a delightful 
occasion. The apparatus exercises were well done, some of them 
being quite hazardous, but the pupils all did their stunts without 
mishap. The English Eolk dances by the Primary class was a bit of 
juvenile cleverness and was one of the hits of the afternoon. The 
marching tactics of the Physical Culture class was equal to any of 
the State College students. The eighth number was much admired, 
being the May Rose Mazurka, an artistic dance, danced to one of 
Chopin's Mazurkas. Another number was a Spring Waltz, which 
was a bit of excellent work by Miss Barton and the class. 

It was hard to tell what was the best work of the classes, but from 
the audience one Would say the Kamarinskaia, which was a lively 



150 The St. Mary's Muse 



Hungarian peasant dance in two-four time, was the feature of the 
afternoon. The dance was a duet done by Lillias Shepherd and 
Beatrice Sheldon. E. B. O. 

The following was the complete program: 

1. Indian Club Drill. 

2. National Dances. 

(a) Tarantella (Italian). 

(ft) Kamarinskaia (Russian) .Lillias Shepherd and Beatrice Sheldon 

3. (a) Moonlight Caprice Sub-Preparatory 

(6) Dance of the Cupids Aesthetic Dancing Class 

4. Apparatus Exercises All Classes 

5. Dumb-bell Drill. 

6. English Folk Dances. 

(a) Hickory Dickery Dock > pr ^ 

(&) Bean Porridge \ 

(c) Morris Dance Sub-Preparatory Class 

7. (a) Marching Tactics. 
(&) "Wand Drill. 

8. (a) May Rose Mazurka > . .. ,. „ . _,, 

; . ' _ . _ T _ v Aesthetic Dancing Class 

(6) Spring Waltz j 

May 4-5 — The Raleigh Musical Festival 

The Raleigh Music Festival, which has been promoted for several 
years by volunteer music enthusiasts, was this year put on a firm 
basis by the incorporation of the Raleigh Music Association, in which 
the School took stock and of which Miss Dowd, our Music Director, is 
one of the directors. 

The Festival was given on Friday and Saturday, May 4th and 
5th, and was pronounced by all those present as possibly the best of 
all the Music Festivals that have been in the city. But unfortunately, 
probably owing partly to the war situation, it was a failure finan- 
cially. 

On Friday evening, May 4th, Madame Alda was soloist and shared 
the program with the Metropolitan Opera House Orchestra, with Mr. 
Richard Hageman as conductor. 

Saturday afternoon Miss Mabel Garrison, soprano, and the orches- 
tra were the features, and on Saturday evening Mr. Evan Williams, 
tenor, the orchestra, and the Raleigh Festival Chorus, under the 
direction of Mr. Gustav Hagedorn, gave the program. 



The St. Maey's Muse 151 

There were about eighty in attendance from St. Mary's, and while 
enjoying all three concerts, they were especially pleased with the 
singing and graciousness of Miss Garrison. 

April 28— The Sixth School Party 

Owing to the conflicting dates of the Raleigh Music Festival and 
the 75th Anniversary celebration the School Party, which has been 
the feature of the student year for five years past on the third Satur- 
day night before the close of School, was held on April 28. The 
School Party was originated by the Class of 1915 in their Freshman 
year and sponsored by them each succeeding year until, at the end 
of their Senior year, they passed it over to the care of successive 
Senior classes, and this year the Class of 1917 had it in charge. 

The parlor was, as usual, effectively festooned in the School colors 
and the colors of the four classes, and the costumes of the various 
classes were never more effective than on this occasion. With the 
teachers occupying their customary places on the east side of the 
parlor opposite the piano, the classes came in in order beginning 
with the Preps in their pink and blue, the Freshmen in green and 
white dunce caps and sashes, the Sophomores wearing shepherdess 
costumes of scarlet and gray, the Juniors wearing caps of orange and 
black. Last came the Seniors in their black caps and gowns, carrying 
their diplomas, and took their places on the west side of the room 
near the piano. 

The program opened with the singing of "In a Grove of Stately 
Oak Trees," after which the welcome was spoken by Alice Latham, 
the President of the Senior Class, and the classes responded in turn, 
beginning with the Preps, each class president making a brief re- 
sponse and the classes then joining in their class song written for the 
occasion, all of which were very effective. Then followed a series of 
topical recitations and songs. Mary Wilson, '20, recited "When the 
Whole School Works Together," with encores; the Freshmen sang a 
song to the Seniors, and Ella Pender and a chorus sang "On the Old 
Porch on Senior Hall." 

A toast to the Rector was given by Eleanor Relyea. Miss Katie 
was toasted by Ethel Yates and made her usual appropriate response 



152 The St. Mary's Muse 

"from the oldest inhabitant," after which all joined in singing 
"Here's to Dear Miss Katie, Girls." Annie Robinson gave a toast to 
Mr. Cruikshank, and Frances Cheatham toasted Miss Thomas in the 
following words : 

Here's to Miss Thomas, our lady so dear, 
Whose departure from us is drawing so near. 
May she in the "happy ever after" recall 
The days at St. Mary's when loved by us all. 
So with part of the love that with us will abide 
I drink to our lady, friend, adviser, and guide. 

Miss Thomas responded in a very gracious speech, after which the 
Seniors joined in singing "Our Eleanor." Led by Martha Wright, 
"Good-bye, 1917," was sung. A toast to America was given by Emma 
Badham, and then all joined in singing "The Star Spangled Ban- 
ner." Refreshments of ice cream and cake were served under the 
direction of the Junior class. The Seniors sang "Good-bye, School, 
We're Through," and with all joining in the singing of "Alma 
Mater," the party came to an end. 

The party was a great success, and while tinged as always with a 
bit of sadness, it served to arouse and increase school spirit on the 
part of the members of the school. 



THE CERTIFICATE RECITALS 



Piano Recital — Katharine Parser Drane 

Moxdat, April 16. 

The first of the diploma and certificate recitals of the season to be 
given at St. Mary's was held on the night of April 16th by Katharine 
Drane, assisted by a vocal trio composed of Ella Pender, Margaret 
Marston, and Audrey Stone. 

The News and Observer of the next day said : 

Miss Katharine Parker Drane, a member of the Junior Class of St. Mary's 
School, gave her certificate piano recital last evening in St. Mary's audi- 
torium. Miss Drane is a pupil of Miss Louise Seymour, who is well known in 



The St. Maey's Muse 153 

Raleigh as a pianist and teacher of ability, as well as an excellent accom- 
panist, having accompanied the Raleigh Festival Chorus in 1916. 

Miss Drane did credit to her teacher in a program including numbers from 
Bach, Mendelssohn, Chopin, MacDowell, Stojowski, and Rubinstein. Her 
playing was sane and true, with good tone, clear phrasing and excellent 
pedaling; her interpretations intelligent and artistically sincere. The third 
group, Valse Triste and Moto Perpetuo, by MacDowell, with Chant d'Armour 
by Stojowski, was beautifully played. The young pianist probably reached 
the height of her technical and interpretative powers in the splendid Rubin- 
stein Concerto in D minor, with Miss Seymour at the second piano. 

Those who were present at the recital will probably never forget the picture. 
The stage, in its dress of dogwood and redbud, seemed a bit of April woods, 
and Miss Drane herself the very spirit of Spring. 

The program follows : 

1. Gavotte E major Bach 

Duetto Mendelssohn 

Preludes No. 17 and 3, Op. 28 i M . 

Nocturne, Op. 37, No. 1 \ Ch0pin 

2. Charity Rossini 

Misses Pender, Makston, and Stone 

3. Valse Triste 
Moto Perpetuo 
Chant d'amour Stojowski 

4. Concerto D minor, Op. 70 Rubinstein 

First movement. 



I MacDowell 



Piano Recital — Sara!) Littlejof)n Rowlings 

Monday, April 23. 

The second of the certificate recitals was given on the 23d of April 
by Sarah Rawlings, assisted by Anita Smith, soprano. Of this the 
News and Observer said: 

Miss Sarah Rawlings, certificate pupil of Mr. R. Blinn Owen, gave a piano 
recital last evening which revealed unusual talent as well as excellent train- 
ing. Her playing of the entire program was poetic and fluent, and her per- 
formance of the Schumann "Symphoniques" and the Saint-Saens "Etude" in 
waltz form was remarkable in one so young. Her technique is brilliant and 
rhythmical. "A Midsummer Night's Dream," by Templeton Strong, a charac- 
teristic bit of modern "programme" music, was given with keen appreciation 
of tone pictures. 

The young pianist had quite an ovation, as the audience was loathe to 
leave after the last number. Her charm of manner, with her attitude of per- 
sonal friendliness towards the audience, added greatly to the interest of the 
attractive program. 



154 The St. Mary's Muse 

Miss Anita Smith, also a pupil of Mr. Owen's, sang charmingly a group 
of songs, "The Time of May," by Salter, "Since Laddie Went Awa'," by 
Strickland, and "The Unremembered," by Class, responding to a hearty encore 
with the favorite "Deep River," which she sang with simplicity and resonant 
quality. 

The program is given: 

1. Chromatic Fantasie in D Minor Bach, 1685-1750 

2. Etudes Symphoniques, Op. 13 Schumann, 1810-1856 

Thema. 

Etude I, II, III. 

Finale. 

3. The Time of May „ Salter 

Since Laddie Went Awa' Strickland 

The Unremembered Class 

Anita Smith. 

4. Etude en forme de valse, Op. 52, No. 6 Saint-Saens, 1835 

5. (a) Waltzes, Op. 39 Brahms, 1833-1897 

(b) A Midsummer Night's Dream, Op. 36, No. 4, Templeton Strong, 1856 

(c) Allegro energico, Op. 31 Sinding, 1856 

(d) Etude de concert, Op. 36 MacDowell, 1861-1908 

Diploma Recital — Martha Boardman Wright — PiaQo 

Monday, Apkil 30. 

Martha Wright's diploma recital in piano was given on April 30. 
She was assisted by Bessie and Mary Ray and Robert Jordan, who 
played a trio for two violins and 'cello, accompanied by Miss Sey- 
mour. The program, which was a difficult and varied one, showed 
the power and versatility of the player, and a most admirable tech- 
nique. She was particularly good in the thrilling Ballade in A flat 
of Chopin, while her brilliancy of style in the Saint-Saens Concerto 
was a fitting climax to a really finished performance. 

The following is the program : 

1. Bourree, G major, 4th Sonata for Violoncello Bach-Tours 

Sonata, Op. 31, No. 2 Beethoven 

First movement, Largo, Allegro. 

2. Ballade in A flat, Op. 47 Chopin 

3. Trio in G, for two violins and 'cello K. Ph. Em. Bach 

4. Second Indian Suite, Op. 48, No. 1 MacDowell 

5. Marche funebre heroi'que, Op. 36 i earlier 
Scherzo, Op. 31 \ 

Consolation, Op. 36, No. 5 Arensky 

Polichinelle (a grotesque clog dance) Rachmaninoff 

6. Concerto in G minor Saint-Saens 

Allegro Scherzando. 



The St. Mary's Muse 155 

Expression— Adeline E. Hugbes, '18 

Monday, May 7. 

On Monday evening at eight-thirty o'clock Adeline E. Hughes, '18, 
certificate pupil of Miss Florence C. Davis, gave her recital in the 
School Auditorium. She was assisted by Ella Banning Pender, 
soprano, who sang exceedingly well. 

Miss Hughes was simple and unaffected in manner and spoke in a 
particularly clear and pleasing voice, her naturalness adding charm 
to her rendering of the readings. She took especially well the parts 
of Mr. and Mrs. Minims in O. Henry's delightful story, and distin- 
guished well the characters of the quiet toned lyrical play of old 
Provence. 

The following is the program : 

1. The Father 'n Mother Tree Anne Hamilton Donnell 

.3. (a) The Exceeding Wiliness of Mrs. Mimms. 

( & ) By Courier 0. Henry 

J. (a) The Wind Spross 

( & ) Calling to Thee Cadman 

(c) Where Blossoms Grow Sans-Souci 

Ella B. Pender 

1. King Rene's Daughter (a Danish Lyrical Drama) .Hendrih Hertz 



The St. Mary's Muse 

Subscription Price ,,**,..,, One Dolla 

Single Copies --------- Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary' 
School, Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumna% under th 
editorial management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1916-17. 

Virginia Caroline Allen, '17 Editor-in-CMe 

Elmyea Jenkins, '17 Exchange Edito, 

Alice Cohn Latham, '17 ) M . „ 

I Senior Reporter; 

Annie Huske Robinson, '17 J 

Estelle Stkozier Ravenel, '18 ) „ 

L Junior Reporter; 

Katharine Parker Drane, '18 I 

Emma Hudgins Badham, '17 Business Manage, 

Frances Howe Cheatham, '17 ) 

t Assistant Business Managen 

Sara Louise Wood, '18 I 



EDITORIAL 



The 75th Anniversary Celebration 

The eagerly awaited Anniversary Celebration on May 11th ant 
12th was a great success, and was much enjoyed by all present. 

A full account of the Anniversary, with reproductions of excellem 
photographs of some of the scenes, will be published in the Special 
Anniversary Number of the Muse, which will be ready shortly aftei 
this number is issued. 



The Annual Muse 

The Annual Muse will be ready on Class Day, as usual. It prom- 
ises to be very pretty, and it is hoped will prove acceptable to all those 
interested in it. 



The St. Mary's Muse 157 



The First Aid Classes 

As recorded in the last Muse, for six weeks the eighty members of 
St. Mary's who were enrolled in the First Aid Classes were busy 
with weekly lessons in First Aid, trying hard to learn how to bandage 
wounds and care for the wounded, etc., whether they be soldiers or 
civilians. The course was completed shortly after Easter, and after 
some delay the required examination was given. The examinations 
afforded one of the most interesting topics of the year. Before they 
were held girls might be seen in groups or alone poring over their 
First Aid manuals and wildly asking each other questions. The 
examinations were made up of demonstration, oral, and written work, 
and after they were over there was a period of suspense for a week 
until the doctors announced the results. The bulletin board was 
surrounded with an eager throng the day the results were posted, 
and the ensuing excitement was even greater than when the monthly 
sheets were posted. Miss Thompson and Agnes Pratt proved to be 
the stars with 100 per cent, but the greatest joy was of course that 
felt by the lucky ones who found themselves with marks higher than 
those of the members of the Faculty who had been fellow members 
of the class. The marks as a whole were creditable, and seventy 
members of the classes passed. 

Drs. West, Thompson, and Bell proved delightful instructors, and 
the course was altogether very pleasant and decidedly profitable to all 
those who took it. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank, Alumnse Editor 

St. Mary's Alumnse Association. 

Honorary President - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

Honorary Vice-Presidents - / Mrs " L McK - ™™Z^ Raleigh. 

I Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 
President - Mrs. W. E. Lindsay, Spartanburg, S. C. 

Vice-President - Mrs. A. L. Baker, Raleigh. 

Secretary - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



Another Word F r on) trje War Zone 



Sussex House, Palace Road, 

East Moulsey, Surrey, England, 

Easter Day, 1917. 

I just wish people could be in more than one place at a time, for I 
often long to be at St. Mary's, and especially do this morning for the 
sweet early service, and wonder how many "old friends" are still 
there. 

So St. Mary's is teaching First Aid. I am glad ; it shows a most 
progressive spirit ! Tell the girls to bone at it for all they are worth, 
for now it will be invaluable to them, and they won't regret ever 
having gone in for it. I took a course in Kingston to better under- 
stand the work. When the matron of the Kingston Military Hos- 
pital sent out a letter for volunteers, trained or otherwise, I went over 
to the barracks at once and was put under a qualified V. A. D. (Vol- 
untary Aid Department). We had two wards containing fourteen 
men each, and besides a charwoman, there were two orderlies to help 
with the rougher work. Of course this extra help is most unusual, 
being given generally only in the Military Hospitals. In the ordi- 
nary Red Cross Hospitals the V. A. D's do all the work. Sometimes 
the night staff is a paid trained nurse, otherwise the help is all volun- 
tary — going on for six weeks and then off duty for another six. I 
loved the work, especially as Sister Boxhall was wonderfully patient, 



The St. Maky's Muse 159 

painstaking, and thoughtful, and got along famously. We had to 
report at 8 :30 a. m., and though supposed to be free at one o'clock, 
it was usually nearer three before I got home. In a larger hospital 
one is not apt to be so late, but we were short handed and the work 
had to be done. 

As the electric car service between Kingston and Hampton Court 
(E. Moulsey) is extremely poor I helped at the barracks only in the 
mornings — every morning. Sister Boxhall, however, lived in Kings- 
ton and so gave up her whole day, often not returning home till after 
nine p. m. Of course all the principal work is done in the morning, 
bathing, dressing wounds, cleaning, etc., but in the afternoon, too, a 
nurse is never off her feet. Being unqualified, I was given the dust- 
ing, washing up, etc., to do, but as time went on and both our wards 
were full (having learned many things from Sister Boxhall) I was 
given them to do by myself. Once I remember when there were 
about twenty medicines to be given I had an awful feeling when a 
nearly well patient said, "How's that, you've changed my medicine, 
sister? This is bitter, and what I had last time was sweet!" But 
the wrong medicine had no ill effect though ever afterwards there 
was always the feeling when giving others, "Is this the right one 
or not ?" 

One fine day the matron sent for me to help her, with the doctor, 
in the surgical (which were the worst cases), and you can guess how 
pleased I was. Then another time I was sent to assist the oculist 
who had come to test new recruits' eyes. So you see when you go in 
for voluntary aid work you get samples of everything, and you can 
not pick and choose. I was more than fortunate to get into such a 
nice place, for in a larger, better equipped hospital I should never 
have had so interesting or responsible experiences where the qualified 
workers only are allowed in the wards. 

Expecting to sail last month, I gave up my post, which was at once 
filled. When my sailing plans went to the wall I looked about for a 
nearer hospital. One has just been opened here, so I offered my 
services, but the new hospital was already well supplied with pantry 
workers, only "First Aiders" being permitted in the wards. So then 
it was I went in for my certificate. Any one with a Red Cross or St. 



160 The St. Mary's Muse 

John's certificate can get hospital work, in which hospitals some of 
the V. A. D's live and are paid. 

To sail, of course, requires a passport which nowadays is difficult 
to obtain from the United States State Department. Boat fares are 
double ($150), and table fares half again what they used to be. 
There is no society among the great majority, for every one is doing 
his or her bit here. Train fares are half again as much, and all 
things are nearly double in price. So I should not advise any one 
crossing — especially as there is more that can be done at home. In 
fact, I hope to sail in May or June to work for my own countrymen 
and friends. There is a rumor that no women are being permitted 
to sail on account of the U-boat dangers. Most of the show places 
are closed to the public and many have been turned into war offices 
and hospitals — the Tait Gallery in London, near Westminster 
Bridge, being among the former. 

I have tried to give you some idea of my work and things you 
wanted to hear of, and if there is anything else, ask it ! Now won't 
you tell me everything about St. Mary's ? — all news doubly welcome. 

Olive E. Smith. 



Aluronae Notes 

Miss Grace Crews, '14, of Raleigh, who went into training the 
year following her graduation, graduated on April 12th from the 
school of nursing of the Children's Hospital at Washington, D. C. 
She will not complete her training until July and has not yet decided 
where she will locate. It will be remembered that Miss Crews is a 
niece of Miss Juliet Sutton of St. Mary's. 

At about the time Grace Crews was completing her training at 
Washington, Arabelle Thomas, S. M. S., 1913-15, took up her train- 
ing at St. Luke's Hospital, Xew York. She was expecting to be 
called in September and we were counting on her presence at the 
Anniversary celebration and Commencement, but the hospital sum- 
moned her and she left for duty almost immediately after the Alumnae 
meeting in Charlotte in which she had taken so much interest. 

With Arabelle Thomas there are now three St. Mary's girls in 



The St. Mary's Muse 161 



training at St. Luke's, the others being Elise Stiles, 1913-15, who 
has completed her second year, and Julia Cooper, '14, who is ending 
her first year. 

Dorothy Brown, 1913, has graduated from St. Luke's and is now 
practicing nursing in New York City. Florence Clarke, '15, is in 
her second year at St. Vincent's Hospital, Norfolk, Va. 

Nell Battle Lewis, '12, and Susannah Busbee, '13, both of Raleigh, 
are in this year's graduating class at Smith College, Northampton, 
Mass., where both have done good work and Miss Lewis has won some 
special honors. 

The Rev. Albert S. Cooper and Mrs. Cooper (Elizabeth Cheshire, 
'95) have lately completed their six months home leave and have 
started on their return trip to China. They are located in the mis- 
sion field at While both Mr. and Mrs. Cooper were 

traveling and making addresses a good part of their time in this 
country, they were also at Bishop Cheshire's from time to time and 
left from there for their return journey. It was a great pleasure to 
have "Miss Elizabeth" back near St. Mary's, and her presence and 
the knowledge of her good works were naturally constant stimuli to 
other St. Mary's girls to take up the mission work. 



Alumnae Weddings 

Henry- Johnston. On April 2, at Hickory, N. C, Adelaide Johnston (S. M. S., 
1912-13) and Mr. R. G. Henry. At home, Rumford, Me. 

Huske-Williams. On Tuesday evening, April 10, at the Church of the Good 
Shepherd, Augusta, Ga., Sadie Williams (S. M. S., 1910-12) and Mr. Benjamin 
(Robinson Huske, Jr. 

LaB or de-Thomas. On Wednesday, April 11, at the Church of the Good 
Shepherd, Columbia, S. C, Emma Irene Thomas (S. M. S., 1913-14), and Mr. 
Pierre Fabian LaBorde. 

Villepigue-Yates. On Wednesday evening, April 11, at Grace Church, Cam- 
den, S. C, Lucia Gibbon Yates (S. M. S., 1907-09) and Mr. John McCaa 
Villepigue. 

Connor-Mann. On Wednesday evening, April 18, at the First Presbyterian 
Church, Raleigh, N. C, Eleanor Vass Mann (S. M. S., 1901-1913) and Mr. 
Louis Mercer Connor. 



162 The St. Maey's Muse 



Foushee-Pearson. At Salisbury, N. C, on April 19, Nellie Holmes Pearson 
(S. M. S., 1908-09) and Mr. Smith Foushee. 

DougMy-Harman. On Saturday, April 21, at New York City, Ella Mildred 
Harman (S. M. S., 1908-1910) and Mr. Lyon Sumter Doughty. At home, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Gilliam-Lamb. On April 26, at the Church of the Holy Innocents, Hender- 
son, N. C, Olivia Hyman Lamb (S. M. S., 1901-02) and Mr. George Gilliam. 
At Home, Henderson, N. C. 

Wood-Leary. On Saturday, April 28, at St. Paul's Church, Edenton, N. C, 
Elizabeth Woodard Leary (S. M. S., 1909-11) and Mr. George Collins Wood. 



Read! Mark! Act! 



: The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
"jaders of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
rinciple to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
lem to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
is their loss, not ours. 



DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 

206-10 MASONIC TEMPLE 



Success in the Campaign for the Raising of the $250,000 
Fund to pay off the debt and provide additional new build- 
ings, and the beginning of an Endowment Fund is of the 
utmost importance to St. Mary's. 

Think of it, talk of it, and help in every way you can. 



B. W. JONES 
I The 

Best in 
Groceries 

iones 667-668 528 Hillsboro Street 



'You get them when promised" 



Hortoh s Studio 

Masonic Temple 



"Workers in Artistic Photography' 



Advertisements 



Stationery, College Linen, Pennants, 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 

Bell Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. 0. 


CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 
Power and Gas 

1376— BOTH PHONES— 1377 


JOHNSON & BROUGHTON 
Good Things to Eat 

122 FAYETTEVILLB STREET 


WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

Coal, Wood, Ice, Brick 

122 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. 0. 


S. GLASS The Ladies' Stor< 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 


H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 


Wm. Heller 

THE FOOTERY SHOP 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THE ALUMNAE ARE REMINDED 
that a complete Alumnce Register, which should include 
information about all past students of St. Mary's, is 
now in course of preparation for publication. 

Information for this Register is solicited. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 

Safe, Secure, and Successful 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

R. S. BUSBEE, Secretary 

Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

Charles E. Johnson, Jr., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 



Hafapette 



A Cafe ■which invites the patronage o 
ladies. The girls of St. Mary's -will enjoj 
the beauty and convenience of our modern 
well-appointed dining - place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

Raleigh, N. C. 

THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 

GOLF, TENNIS, AND SPORTING GOODS 

MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
104 EAST HARGETT ST. Bell Phone 71 



Advertisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STOKE 

Phones 228 



HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 



fhomas H. Briggs & Sons 

Vhe Big Hardware Men Raleigh, N. C. 



Base Balls, Basket Balls 
Tennis and Sporting Goods 



taleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 
12 W. Hargett St. 

RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 



Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 

Phone 529 

DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 

T. P. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies. 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 



Subscriptions for the monthly Mtjse are very acceptable 
at all times. One dollar will bring the ten copies of the 
Muse published next after its receipt. 



PERRY'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington St. 
alifornia Fruit Store, 111 Fayetteville St., Raleigh 

ancy fruits and pure ice cream. Best equipped and most 
itnitary ice cream factory in the state. Our cream is the 
Quality Kind." Send us your orders. California Fruit 
;ore, 111 Fayetteville St. , Yurnakes & Co., Props., Raleigh. 

BATES-ARRINGTON & COMPANY 
PURE FOOD GROCERIES 

HAYES & HALL— STUDIO 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY 

J. L. O'Quinn & Co. 

Florists 

L. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 



MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 
VISITING CARDS 

CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY ENGRAVED 

Send for samples and prices 

Edwards & Broughton Printing 



Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 



Raleigh's Leading and Largest Hotel 



Dinners and Banquets a Specialty 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Co., Proprietor 



Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Co. 

COLLEGE 
JEWELRY 

128 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


YOUNG & HUGHES 

Plumbers 

Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 

S. Wilmington Street 


WATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades. 


C. D. ARTHUR City Market 
FISH AND OYSTERS 


SHOES! WHOSE? 
BERNARD L. CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street 


ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N, 0. 

College Pennants, Pillows, Pictures, 
Frames, Novelties 


GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance and Investments 


EOYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTI 

Made Fresh Every Day 



OUTHER 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tick- 
ets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, as well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
trip to any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. They will 
gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the 
cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you 



H. F. CARY, General Pass. Agent, 
Washington, D. C. 



J. 0. JONES, Traveling Pass. Agent, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements 



/. Mary's Girls Always Welcome at 

Hudson-Belk Company 

mil line of Ready-to-wear, Hosiery, Gloves, Furnishings, Dry 
Goods, Shoes, Toilet Goods, Ribbons and Laces 



ESTABLISHED 1858 



L MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

ALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

ttif . ROSENTHAL & COMPANY 

GROCERS 

Wilmington and Hargett Streets 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 
AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Cor. Fayetteville and Hargett Sts. 



THOMAS A PARTIN COMPANY 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Specialty of Ladies' Ready-to-Wear Gar- 
ments and Gossard's Lace Front Corsets 



THE SCHOOL AUTHORITIES 

are at all times pleased to send full information 
about St. Mary's on request without charge. 
"We should like every one interested to have at 
least copies of 

The Illustrated Catalogue, 

The Books of Views, 

The Song Book. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



BOYUN-PEARGE 

COMPANY 

The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 



Adveetisements 



»■ ?£rv»l»«l B© 1 




J Exclusive 
jj Millinery 



RALEIGH N.C 



W. E. BONNER 
Shoe Repairing- 



Raleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' 
and Misses' Ready-to-Wear Garments 

TEN PER CENT OFF TO COLLEGE GIRLS 

W$t Jfasijton 

KAPLAN BROS. COMPANY 

Fayetteville Street 

ORDER YOUR CUT FLOWERS 

FEOM 

J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Phone 149 

SEE 

Herbert Rosenthal 

FOR REAL SHOES 

Come to the 75th Anniversary 
May 12th 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 



ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS' 



Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



NORFOLK 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 

Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule, Best Service 



H. S. LEARD, G. P. A. 

Norfolk, Va. 



Double Daily Express Service 



J. F. MITCHELL, T. P, A, 

Raleigh, N. Cj 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

75th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBEE 15, 1916. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGAN JANUARY 25, 1917. 



1. TEE COLLEGE 

2. TEE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
St. Mary's \ $ TEE ART DEPARTMENT 

Off GTS I 

instruction I h TEE ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 
in these ] 6m THE HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 
i? ' 6. TEE BUSINESS SCEOOL 

7. TEE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



In 1916-17 are enrolled 275 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 
Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 
Dormitories. 
Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 
slight to the Scholastic training. 
For catalogue and other information address 

Rev. Ceorge W. Lay, D. C. L. t 

Rector. 

Kli WARDS 6 BltOUGHTON PRINTING CO., RALIiGH N. C 



M. Jfflarp's; jfWuse 

&aletgf), Jl C. 



75tf) Unnibergarp Jlumber 

Jul?, 1917 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

The Anniversary Year 3 

St. Mary's, Alma Mater (Verses) 3 

Irma Beaton, '10. 

The Anniversary Celebration, May 11-12, 1917 4 

Program of the Exercises 5 

The 75th Anniversary 11 

Annie 8. Cameron, '16. 
Anniversary Contributions : 

The Thirteen Originals (Prize Verses) 15 

Aline Hughes, '18. 

Dr. Aldert Smedes 16 

Alice Cohn Latham, '17. 

St. Mary's 19 

Annie Huske Robinson, '17. 

The Power of Personality (Winning Speech) 21 

Aline Hughes, '18. 

A Sacred Spot (Prize Verses) 25 

Henrietta Morgan, '18. 

Three Scenes from the Life of St. Mary's (Winning Sketch) 26 

Katharine P. Drane, '18. 

A Day at Old St. Mary's (Verses) 31 

"Ruth Newoolcl" (Mrs. J. M. Vail.) 

The Out-of-Town Guests at the Anniversary 31 

Some Anniversary Greetings from Alumnae 33 

To the St. Mary's Teachers of 1905-08 , 36 

Elizabeth T. Waddill, '08. 

Anniversary Meeting of the Charlotte Alumna 36 

In the Interest of St. Mary's (The Endowment Fund) 38 



- . 




The St. Mary's Muse 

75th ANNIVERSARY NUMBER 



Vol. XXI July, 1917 No. 7 



THE ANNIVERSARY YEAR 



The Seventy-fifth Year of St. Mary's ! 

The Fiftieth Year of "Miss Katie" at St. Mary's ! 

The Twentieth Year of the Church Ownership of St. Mary's! 

The Tenth Year of the Present Rectorship ! 

Truly this has been in the history of St. Mary's a very year of 
Anniversaries, and in the Anniversary Celebration on May 11-12 we 
have tried to do honor to the occasion. 



St. Mary's, Alma Mater 

(Written for the Anniversary.) 



Irma Deaton, '10. 

However far thy daughters rove, 
Thou callest from thy cherished grove, 
Drawing us back with cords of love — 
St. Mary's, Alma Mater. 

Thine every spot to us is blest, 
Thy grove, thy halls, but ever best 
Thy Chapel, place of peace and rest — 
St. Mary's, Alma Mater. 

We who have dwelt within thy halls 
Have gone from out thy vine-clad walls 
More brave to tread where duty calls — 
St. Mary's, Alma Mater. 

Where'er we go, in all we do, 
Thy spirit guides us, holds us true, 
So be it still the long years through — 
St. Mary's, Alma Mater. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



THE ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION, MAY 12, 1917 



In the Anniversary Celebration, following the spirit of St. Mary's 
rather than the formal arrangement usual in colleges on such anni- 
versaries, chief stress was laid on the welcoming back of the Old 
Girls by the St. Mary's girls of the present, and the entertainment 
was largely an attempt to revive in all St. Mary's Girls the recollec- 
tions of the scenes of their St. Mary's and make them realize them- 
selves an ever integral part of the School. 

The program was the following : 

Friday, May 11, 8:30 p. m. In the Auditorium. Bishop Cheshire, President 
of the Board of Trustees, presiding. Addresses by Dr. W. S. Currell, President 
of the University of South Carolina, and by Miss Ernilie Watts McVea, St. 
Mary's, '84, President of Sweetbrier College. 

Saturday, May 12, 8 a. m. In the Chapel. Celebration of the Holy Com- 
munion (with music). The Rector, celebrant. 

10:30 a. m. In the Auditorium. Student Literary Exercises. Brief his- 
torical speeches by representatives of the Literary Societies, and announce- 
ment of the winners in the Inter-society Competition for the best original 
articles, historical and imaginative; and verses, and the reading of them 
by the winners. 

5:00 p. m. In the Grove. Anniversary Festival, Miss Thomas, Mistress 
of Ceremonies. A St. Mary's pageant, with the entire School participating, 
with procession reviewed by the visitors at the outdoor stage in the front of 
the grove, and the special feature staged at that point. 

8:30 p. m. In the Auditorium. The Chorus Class, under the direction of 
Mr. Owen, in a presentation of Gilbert and Sullivan's opera, "Patience." 

This was the Third Anniversary Celebration on a large scale in the 
history of St. Mary's. 

On June 4, 1897, at the Commencement Season, in the last years 
of Dr. Bennett Smedes, the Fiftieth Anniversary of the School was 
celebrated, most of the exercises being held at Christ Church. 

On April 22, 1910, the Hundredth Anniversary of the birth of 
Dr. Aldert Smedes, the Founder, was fittingly observed at the School, 
with a large attendance of visiting alumnae, who were entertained in 
the School buildings. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



PROGRAM OF THE EXERCISES 



Commemorating trje Seventy-fiftb Anniversary of trje 
Opening of St. Mary's School, on May 12, 1842 



MAY 11-12, 1917 
Friday, May 11th: 

8:30 p.m. Historical Celebration in the Auditorium. 
Saturday, May 12th: 

8:00 a.m. Holy Communion in the Chapel. 
10:30 a.m. Student Exercises in the Auditorium. 
2 : 00 p. m. Anniversary Luncheon in Clement Hall. 
5:00 p.m. Anniversary Festival in the Grove. 
8:30 p.m. The Chorus Class in "Patience" in the Auditorium. 



FRIDAY, MAY 11 

8:30 P. M.: Historical Celebration 

Invocation Bishop Cheshire 

St. Mary's Hymn Choral Class 

Welcome and Introduction Bishop Cheshire 

Address: Dr. William S. Currell, President of the University of South Carolina 
Address: Miss Emilie Watts McVea, '84, President of Sweetbrier College 

Kipling's "Recessional" (DeKoven) The Choir 

Announcements The Rector 

Benediction Bishop Cheshire 

Alma Mater The School 



SATURDAY, MAY 12 

8 :00 A. M. : In the Chapel 

Celebration of the Holy Communion The Rector, Celebrant 

Processional Hymn (396): "Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand." 
Recessional Hymn (491) : "The Church's One Foundation." 



9:00 a. m. Breakfast in Clement Hall. 



10:30 A. M.: Anniversary Meeting of the Literary Societies 

Alpha Rho: Nellie Rose, President. 

Epsilon Alpha Pi: Georgia Foster, President. 

Sigma Lambda: Eleanor Relyea, President. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



1. Song: "In a Grove of Stately Oak Trees." 

2. Historical Sketch: "Three Scenes in the Life of St. Mary's," 

Katharine Drane, Sigma Lambda 

3. Poem: "A Sacred Spot" — Henrietta Morgan, E A P. 

4. Songs: 

a. Happy and Innocent. 

6. To Find Mr. Cruikshank. 

c. In the Old Swing on Senior Hall. 

5. Poem: "The Thirteen Originals" — Aline Hughes, A R. 

6. Song: "The Time Has Come for Us to Graduate" — Senior Class. 

7. a. The Power of Personality — Aline Hughes, A R. 
h. Dr. Aldert Smedes — Alice Latham, E A P. 

c. Saint Mary's — Annie H. Robinson, Sigma Lambda. 

8. Poem: "The Chapel," by Annie S. Cameron, '16. 

Read by Ethel Yates, '17. 

9. Song: "Alma Mater." 



2:00 P. M.: Alumnse Luncheon in Clement Hall 

Rev. George W. Lay, Rector, Presiding 

Welcome, for the School The Rector 

Welcome, for the Students. . . .Miss Alice Latham, '17, President Senior Class 
(followed by Mr. H. E. Hodgson's lines to the Alumnae, written 
for the 100th Anniversary of Dr. Aldert Smedes, the Pounder, 
in 1910, recited by Miss Nancy Woolford, '20, President Fresh- 
man Class.) 
Response to the Welcomes, for the Alumna?, 

Miss Kate B. Cheshire, '79, Tarboro 
The Anniversaries: 

Seventy-five Years of the School. 

"The School and Its Founder" Mrs. W. A. Montgomery, Raleigh 

Fifty Years of Service. 

Miss McKimmon, "the Oldest Inhabitant" Miss Martha A. Dowd, '84 

Twenty Years of Church Ownership Judge W. A. Hoke 

Ten Years of the Present Rectorship, 

Mrs. Arthur R. Moore, Brunswick, N. J. 
(Mary Mitchell Chamberlain, '10) 

The St. Mary's Building and Endowment Fund Rev. Francis M. Osborne 

The Girls Mrs. Thomas W. Bickett 

(Fannie Yarboro, '89) 
The Alumnae Speaker — President Emilie W. McVea, '84, 

Miss Eleanor W. Thomas 



There were about 350 guests at the luncheon, including the out-of-town 
guests, the local Alumnae, the Trustees, and the members of the School. 



The St. Mary's Muse 



5:00 P. M.: The Anniversary Festival 

THE FESTIVAL PROGRAM 

The Procession 

Departments of School Work presented by the Students. 
Periods in the Life of St. Mary's presented by the Alumnae. 

The Procession advances from the farther side of West Rock across 
the Circle towards the South Walk. 
Leader: Eleanor Relyear, '17. 

Attendants: Katharine Drane, '18; Estelle Ravenel, '19; Adelaide 
Boylston; Isabel Jones. 
The groups come forward in the following order: 
The leader speaks the Prologue (written by Annie Cameron, '16). 

1. Music. Colors: Old Rose and Green. 

2. Art. Colors: Green and White. 

Subject: Some Famous Pictures. 

3. English and Expression. 

Colors: Red and White; Orange and Black. 
Subject: Players and dancers in "Winter's Tale." 

4. German. 

Colors: 
Subject : 

5. French. 

Colors: 
Subject: 



Blue and Gold. 

Maidens in peasant girls' costumes (Hermann und Dorothea). 



White and Gold. 

France — Bartholdi's Statue of Liberty.... 
La Marseillaise — Gustave Dore's painting. 
Villagers of Alsace (1872). 



.Dorothy Wood 
.Georgia Foster 



6. Latin. 

Colors: 
Subject: 



Purple and Gold. 
Roman Matrons and Girls. 
7. Mathematics. 

Colors: Crimson and Gray. 
Geometrical Figures. 



Symbols: 
Science. 
Colors: 
Subject: 



9. Bible. 

Colors: 
10. History. 
Colors: 
Subject : 



Yellow, Green, and Brown. 
Botany — flowers. 
Chemistry — the spectrum. 
Geology. 

Scarlet and Black. 



Red, White, and Blue. 

Foreign Relations of 1917, presented by Flags of the Allies. 
11. Physical Education. 

Colors: Light Blue and Black. 
Departments : Gymnastic. 
Athletic. 
Esthetic. 



The St. Maey's Muse 



12. Domestic Art and Science. 

Colors Yellow and White. 

13. Business. 

Colors: Dark Blue and White. 

14. ALUMN.E. 

Device: St. Mary's Banner. 

"The Original Thirteen." 1842. 
Group presenting 1860's. 
Group presenting 1870's. 
Group presenting 1880's. 
Group presenting 1890's. 
The Literary Societies. 1899. 
The Sororities. 1901-1912. 
Alumna? Groups. 1910-1916. 

The Program 

1. Figure Drills. 

2. Representatives or the Music Department: 

Dance and Song: "In the Time of Roses." 

3. (a) Wand Drill. 

(b) Esthetic Dance: 

Moonlight Caprice. 

4. Representation of the Art Department in Living Pictures: 

(1) "Lilacs" — Sir Frederick Watts Elizabeth Hughes 

(2) "Lady Hamilton" — Sir Geroge Romney Helen Battle 

(3) "The Duchess of Devonshire" — Sir Thomas Gainsborough, 

Louise Arbogast 

(4) "The Broken Pitcher" — Grenze Mary Polk 

(5) "Mona Lisa" — Leonardo da Vinci Jane Ruffin 

(6) "The Jester" — Franz Hals Ellen B. Lay 

(7) "Pierrot" — Robaudi .Nettie C. Daniels 

(8) "Infanta Margherita" — Velasquez Nancy Lay 

(9) "Cupid" — Aubert Caroline Mann 

(10) "Dutch Lady" — Rembrandt Susan Linehan 

5. Singing Game: Mowing the Barley. 

6. "La Derniere Classe." (Dramatized and arranged from the story of 

Alphonse Daudet.) 
Argument: After the war of 1870-'71 Alsace-Lorraine was taken from 
France by the Germans. French was no longer to be taught in the 
schools. Here the schoolmaster, Hamel, and his daughter, Odile, 
are teaching. A German teacher, Otto, is sent from Berlin to take 
Hamel's place, and henceforth teach the German language. At noon 
he will take charge. Hamel is overcome at the news. His daughter 
learns from him that they are to be sent away. He holds his class 
for the last time in French, and both young and old people are 
present. The Angelus bell rings at noon, and with it ends the last 
class, goes up the last prayer in French. 



The St. Maky's Muse 



DRAMATIS PERSONS 

Hamel, a French schoolmaster Rubie Thorn 

Odile, his daughter Bessie Folk 

Otto, a German schoolmaster Mildred Collins 

Hauser Beatrice Sheldon 

Frantz Ruth Gebert 

Sophie Mary Wilson 

A Postman Josephine Myers 

Louise Virginia Pottle 

Pupils and Parents. 

Time: 1872. 

Place: A country school in Alsace-Lorraine. 

7. Tarantella. 

8 Morris Jig. 

9. Minuet. 

Alumnae. 

10. "Flowers of the South." A waltz written for and dedicated to St. Mary's 

girls by Gustav Blessner. 1844. 

11. "Winter's Tale." Act IV, Scenes III and IV. 

DRAMATIS PERSONS 

Polixenes, King of Bohemia Evelyn Moss 

Camillo, a Lord of Sicily. Alice Latham 

Florizel, Prince of Bohemia Helen Laughinghouse 

Old Shepherd, reputed father of Perdita Nancy Woolford 

Clown, his son Annie Robinson 

Autolycus, a rogue Mary Neal 

Servant Eva Peel 

Perdita, Princess of Sicily, reputed a shepherdess. . .Frances Cheatham 

Mopsa (shepherdesses ( Ella Pender 

Dorcas r j Alice Seed 

Epilogue Virginia C. Allen 

Other servants, shepherdesses, shepherds, herdsmen. 

Scene III: A road near the Shepherd's cottage. 

Scene IV: The Shepherd's cottage: a rustic feast. 

Argument: Leontes, king of Sicilia, in a fit of jealous rage with his 
wife and his friend, Polixenes, king of Bohemia, sent away his infant 
daughter, Perdita, to death. She was rescued in Bohemia by an old 
shepherd and grew up in ignorance of her noble parentage. Prince 
Florizel, disguised as Doricles, loves Perdita and wishes to marry 
her. He meets her at her foster-father's feast, to which his father, 
Polixenes, and Camillo come in disguise. After the events of the 
scenes presented in which Florizel protests his faithfulness to Per- 
dita in the face of his father's opposition, and determines upon flight 
to Sicilia, Polixenes and Leontes are reconciled, and after the dis- 
covery of her identity, Perdita is united in marriage with Florizel. 



10 The St. Maey's Muse 

12. "Evening" (Lucantoni) . 

Alumnae Trio: Mrs. A. L. Baker, Mrs. T. M. Ashe, Mrs. James Briggs, Jr. 

13. (a) Flag Drill. 

(b) "The Star Spangled Banner." 

8:80: Sir Arthur Sullivan's Opera, "Patience" 

Presented by the Chorus Class under the direction of Mr. R. Blinn Owen, 
assisted by Miss Martha Roberts. 

First presented at the Pre-Christmas appearance of the Chorus Class, and 
repeated at the Anniversary. 

Sir Arthur Sullivan's Comic Opera "Patience," 

or 

"The Bride of Bunthorne" 

(in two Acts) 

Scene: A glade. 

The Cast 

Officers of Dragoon Guards: 

Colonel Calverley Miss Mary Neal 

Major Murgatroyd Miss Sara Rawlings 

Lieut. Duke of Dunstable .Miss Audrey Stone 

Reginald Bunthorne (a fleshly poet) Miss Marion Thompson 

Archibald Grosvenor (an idyllic poet) Miss Anita Smith 

Rapturous Maidens: 

The Lady Angela Miss Mamie Holt 

The Lady Saphir Miss Aline Hughes 

The Lady Ella Miss Helen McNeill 

The Lady Jane Miss Ruby Thorn 

Patience (a dairy maid) Miss Ella Pender 

Twenty Love-sick Maidens: 

Misses Mary Lindsay, Dorothy Wood, Virginia Williams, Selma Fishel, 
Margaret Yorke, Elizabeth Wingate, Louise Walker, Marianna Stanley, 
Lucia Slade, Hattie Copeland, Lou Spencer Avent, Frances Hillman, 
Katharine Shuford, Nancy Lay, Catherine Mott, Anna Patch, Eugenia 
Griffith, Elizabeth Waddell, Mildred Collins, Margaret Marston. 

Dragoon Guards: 

Misses Louise King, Ellen Lay, Josephine Myers, Gertrude Merrimon, 
Florie Bell Morgan, Mildred Kirtland, Katherine Lefferts, Helen McCoy, 
Pauline Donlon, Virginia Pope Allen, Laura Hyman. 



The St. Mary's Muse 11 



THE 75th) ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION 



Annie Sutton Cameron, '16 

Though May 12th is always a date to be looked forward to, and 
Alumnae Day a time of rejoicing, the excitement of other years 
seemed mild indeed when compared with the eagerness and expec- 
tancy which heralded the approach of Alumnae Day of this year, 
marking as it did the 75th Anniversary of the School and forming, 
as it were, a grand climax to a whole year of Anniversaries. 

The guests who began arriving on Friday, the 11th, were led to 
rooms made spotlessly clean by their owners who were eager to show 
this hospitality and welcome to their sisters of former years. And 
soon the halls began to ring with merry laughter and happy voices 
welcoming old classmates and friends. 

The real celebration began on Friday night with addresses in the 
Auditorium by Miss Einilie McVea, our most distinguished Alumna, 
now President of Sweetbrier College, and Dr. William S. Currell, 
President of the University of South Carolina. It was indeed an 
inspiring scene with the whole Auditorium packed with the St. 
Mary's girls of many years, and it was good to see again so many 
familiar faces. For many of us this was our first introduction to 
Miss McVea, and we felt it a great privilege indeed to hear her of 
whom we had heard so much and who seemed to us to form so in- 
tegral a part of the "Old St, Mary's." 

In spite of the fact that excitement ran too high to permit of much 
sleep on Friday night, Saturday morning, the great day itself, wag 
ushered in by many early risers, and at the time of the early service 
the Chapel was crowded to the doors. This Communion Service was 
accompanied by music as are the Easter Celebrations. Dearly 
familiar as it was, it seemed to hold for us a deeper meaning and a 
new significance as we, the girls of yesterday, joined together in that 
close bond of love and fellowship. 

At 10 :30 the Alumna? again gathered in the Auditorium, there 
to be entertained by the students at a literary meeting, the program 
for which was arranged by the three literary societies. This was an 
event of special interest as it marked the culmination of the Inter- 



12 The St. Mary's Muse 

Society contests, and formed a fitting close for the literary activities 
of the year. At the meeting each society was represented on the stage 
by their respective presidents and two members who took part in the 
program. The winning poems were read by Aline Hughes, Alpha 
Rho, and Henrietta Morgan, E. A. P., and the winning historical 
sketch by Katharine Drane, Sigma Lambda. The three Anniversary 
speakers, chosen for the occasion by the three literary societies, were 
Annie Robinson, Sigma Lambda, Alice Latham, E. A. P., and Aline 
Hughes, Alpha Rho. The speeches were good and were given with 
splendid delivery, showing earnestness and enthusiasm, together with 
excellent understanding of the subjects and full appreciation of the 
spirit of the occasion. Hearty applause followed, and the judges 
had some difficulty in coming to a decision. First place was, how- 
ever, awarded to Aline Hughes, who spoke on "The Power of Per- 
sonality," thus securing to Alpha Rho the victory in the contest. The 
meeting was indeed an inspiration, and the program was one of the 
best ever rendered by the societies. 

When the literary meeting was over both students and Alumnae 
drifted into the Grove, there to loiter and become better acquainted 
until the lunch bell rang at two o'clock summoning them to Clement 
Hall. The attendance this year at the Alumna? luncheon far sur- 
passed that of any other year, and a very pretty scene it made with 
the many tables bright with flowers and filled with the daughters and 
friends of St. Mary's. The luncheon itself consisted of a salad course 
followed by ice cream and cake. According to the custom of many 
years, the lunch was followed by various short speeches, the first 
being a welcome by Dr. Lay, then a welcome to the Alumnae given 
by Alice Latham, President of the Senior Class, completed by the 
reading of a poem by Nancy Woolford, written for the Smedes Cen- 
tennial celebration by the late good friend of St. Mary's, Mr. Hodg- 
son. This welcome was answered by Miss Kate Cheshire. This was 
followed by several toasts, one calling forth much amusement and 
hearty applause being given by Miss Dowd in the form of questions, 
the final one being met with the ringing answer, "Miss Katie!" from 
the whole dining-room. As soon as lunch was over the girls scattered 
to their rooms to don the costumes for the pageant to follow. Soon 



The St. Mary's Muse 13 

the benches were filled with an eager crowd of spectators, for the 
greatest event of the whole day was about to take place, and the huge 
pageant for which every one had planned and worked for weeks was 
about to begin. 

In the meantime the Alumnae had assembled in the parlor and 
gathering under different banners marked "The 1880's," "The 
1890's," and "The 1900's," were forming themselves in a line to join 
in the procession, at whose head marched the "Thirteen Originals" 
and which ended with a 1916 banner. The Alumnas waited in readi- 
ness in the front of Main Building while the Pageant of the School 
wound around the corner of West Rock. 

The procession was led by Eleanor Relyea of the Senior Class, 
bearing a banner representing the Seal of St. Mary's, attended by 
Katharine Drane, of the Junior Class, and Estelle Ravenel of the 
Sophomore Class. After the welcome was spoken by Eleanor Relyea 
the long line followed, bearing banners representing Music, Art, Eng- 
lish, Expression, French, German, Latin, Mathematics, Science, 
Bible, History, Physical Education, Domestic Art and Science, and 
Business. The girls in each group were in suitable costumes and bore 
symbols appropriate to the subject which they represented, all making 
a striking spectacle with the bright banners and flags, the gay cos- 
tumes and vivid colors. And "Uncle Sam" was there in his national 
attire receiving cheers and admiration on all sides. 

The Grand March was followed by a complicated figure, after 
which were various songs and drills, interspersed with many attrac- 
tive and varied dances. Among the most interesting features of the 
entertainment were the "Living Pictures," presented by the Art De- 
partment, the French Play — "La Derniere Classe," — given by the 
French Department, and the fete scene of "Winter's Tale," given 
by the Senior English Class. The program was brought to a close 
with a beautiful flag drill and the singing of the "Star Spangled 
Banner." 

We feel that it is chiefly to Miss Thomas that we owe the pag- 
eant's brilliant success, for without her wonderful ability, inspiration, 
and untiring effort such results could never have been accomplished. 
We also feel that special thanks are due Miss Barton, who put her 



14 The St. Mary's Muse 

best efforts into working up the drills and dances which proved such 
a successful part of the programs. Miss Davis trained the players 
with her usual ability, and Miss Fenner and others produced the 
many effective banners and emblems. But a word must also be said 
for the girls themselves who worked enthusiastically and faithfully 
on costumes, some producing more than one. It was indeed teachers 
and students all working well together that made the result what 
it was. 

The Anniversary celebration was brought to a close with the 
presentation of Sir Arthur Sullivan's operetta, "Patience," given 
under the able direction of Mr. Owen by the chorus class. The Audi- 
torium was well filled and the stage made a lovely picture with the 
bright costumes of the players against a most artistic background of 
flowers, green and dainty white fencing. Special thanks are due Mr. 
Owen for his splendid training, and to Miss Thompson, who on short 
notice so ably filled the role which Martha Wright was to have had 
when she was called home. The operetta was greatly enjoyed by 
all, and the spirit of the participants, so full of life and interest in 
their roles, added keenly to the enjoyment of the audience. 

We must also remember with deep thanks the untiring efforts of 
Mr. Cruikshank in getting invitations off and making public the 
coming of the pageant to the many interested, to which is due the 
good attendance, and his faithful attention to a multitude of details 
which made possible much of the "good time." 

The whole Anniversary celebration will long be remembered by all 
who witnessed its many interesting features. The School and the 
girls of today feel a deeper love and interest for the girls of yesterday 
who came for a visit at this time, and it has indeed strengthened the 
bond between girls and Alumnae for all time. The cooperation of 
the Alumnae in taking part in costume in the pageant added much 
to its unity and interest. 

It was with a feeling of regret and loss that the guests departed, 
but we were all glad and grateful for even so brief a visit and the 
opportunity we had had of knowing personally so many of whom we 
have read and heard while here at School. We feel the wealthier by 
many a good friend from their number, and hope that the time shall 
come when we shall meet at St. Mary's, our Alma Mater, once again. 



The St. Mary's Muse 15 



The Thirteen Originals 



(Metre: Alfred Noyes' "Forty Singing Seamen.") 

Aline Hughes, '18, A P. 
(The Prize Verses in the Anniversary Contest.) 

Away from home and mother off to boarding school we rolled, 
Thirteen wondering school girls in the big stage-coach. 
The coach got there at twilight, and thru the grove we bowled, 
Wondering if the Teachers had noted our approach. 

But the door was open wide, 

Sending golden light outside, 
And we tho't they must have noted our approach; 
Must have long been warned of us by rumblings from the coach. 

But not for long we wondered if perhaps we had been heard, 
We thirteen wondering school girls at our Alma Mater's door, 
For a lady, sweet and motherly, with smile and cheering word, 
And a gentleman, whose smile we'll ne'er forget till life is o'er, 

Came quickly out to meet us, 

With kindly words to greet us, 
And to lead us gently thru our dear St. Mary's door; 
For the first time then to lead us thru our dear St. Mary's door. 

She led us to our dear old "dorm," and showed each one her alcove there; 
They showed us thru the parlor with its picture-covered walls. 
The homesickness in throats and eyes was very hard to bear, 
But even in our homesickness we loved those rooms and halls. 

The Faculty were cheerful 

For they knew that we felt tearful, 
And they tried to cheer us up as they led us thru the halls; 
Yes, they tried to entertain us as they showed us all the halls. 

We learned to love those dear people and East Rock Chapel small; 
We'll carry all their pictures in our minds where'er we go, 
But when we were just school girls, without a great life call, 
How could we then prophesy how our dear school would grow? 

We were school girls just like others; 

We were not then your grandmothers; 
We were thirteen wondering school girls, so how could we then know? 
We were the thirteen first St. Mary's girls. Of course we couldn't know. 

We could not know that '17 would hail and celebrate 

The day when first we came, just five and seventy years ago; 



16 The St. Mary's Muse 

That after years they would recall that happy, happy date, 

As thirteen wondering school girls of course we did not know. 

In long past happy springs 

We played where you have Wings, 
Of Clement Hail of course we could not know; 
Of all the joys of '17 of course we could not know. 

Girls of '17, we originals would say, 

Our blessings now are with you as you each one ought to know. 

As we have loved St. Mary's may you ever love it too 

And carry on her teachings as on your way you go. 

If we had known of you 

We might have been more true, 
But we were only schoolgirls, so of course we did not know; 
The first thirteen St. Mary's girls, of course we could not know. 



ANNIVERSARY SPEECHES 

By the Representatives of the Literary Societies 



Dr. Aldert Smedes 

Alice Cohn Latham, '17, E A II. 

We are celebrating the 75th Anniversary of St. Mary's School. 
Today, more than ever, we are realizing its stimulating and en- 
nobling influence, and we are thankful for what St. Mary's has been 
and has done. Our attitude is retrospective, and as we look back 
over the history of three-quarters of a century, we realize that the 
significance of this day arises chiefly from one holy life, one inspiring 
influence, Dr. Aldert Smedes, the founder. 

Dr. Aldert Smedes was born on April 20, 1810, in the city of ISTew 
York. He was educated at Columbia College, there studying law; 
then later entering the General Theological Seminary in ]STew York 
to prepare for his life work. In 1833 he married. In 1842 by chance 
he met on the streets of IsTew York Bishop Ives, and learning from 
him that he was in search of a clergyman to open a Church school 
in Raleigh, Dr. Smedes at once offered himself; and in two months 
time he was in Raleigh. 

So it was on May 12, 1842, that St. Mary's life began. It was 
erected on a foundation of indestructible character, for it sprang 



The St. Mary's Muse 17 



from the devotion, strength, and faith of its founder. Every great 
school is the outcome of some great man. It is the materialized 
vision of hope of some strong personality, a personality fearless, 
intellectual, and inspiring. Such was our founder. Dr. Smedes saw 
his ideal and was not afraid of it. He saw the vision and scorned 
not the drudgery. But he had the skill, power, and courage to work 
out his plan. It takes courage springing from fearless self-confidence 
to venture a new enterprise on the ruins of failure. And it was with 
the knowledge of the Church's unsuccessful attempt at a boys' school 
on this very spot that Dr. Smedes came to Kaleigh to open a school 
for girls, and he reaped from his attempt a success of which we are 
all proud and for which we are all grateful. His work was of that 
endurance and characteristic of which Carlyle writes: "Genuine 
work alone what thou workest faithfully — that is eternal — eternal 
as the Almighty and World Builder Himself." 

Bishop Atkinson says of Dr. Smedes: "He lived the Christian 
life and the life in him had the quality of all true life, that it quick- 
ened the life of others." The ideal teacher is he who has expert 
knowledge, tempered by a spirit of reverent ministry to those placed 
under his tuition. Such was Dr. Smedes. He did not forget that the 
character of the teacher rather than the mind, the personality rather 
than the ability, is the main thing that counts. He did not forget 
that we ourselves must be true, high, self-controlled, noble, if we 
would make our pupils so. A most impressive incident that proved 
the mettle of his character was when on a bright Sunday morning 
during the latter part of the service a messenger boy suddenly ap- 
peared at the Chapel door. Every mind turned to the thought of 
the great battle then raging in which Dr. Smedes's son Edward was 
taking part. He closed the service with quiet dignity and, going out, 
received the notice of the death of his third son sacrificed for his 
country. "The morrow found him at the post of duty as brave a 
soldier as the son who fell in battle." With him teaching was taking 
the child mind and character and bringing it into sympathetic con- 
tact with his own personality, thus imparting to it his own intel- 
lectual and spiritual possessions. In the pure heart, in the kindly 
courtesy, in the firm self-control, in the unflinching courage, and in 
2 



18 The St. Mary's Muse 



the touch of the high soul the influence of the man lay. A subtle, 
lasting influence was his — an influence which imparted a grace to 
womanhood, and which developed for those under his guidance a 
sincere but unpretentious goodness not so surely found elsewhere. 
His work was found not only in this State, but even in Texas it made 
its impress. In 1889 Bishop Garrett of Texas wrote Dr. Bennett 
Smedes to ask that he would inform him regarding his father's 
methods of "teaching the Scripture and indoctrinating his girls." 
"For," said he, "I find all over my Diocese the beginning of churches 
and Sunday schools, the work of St. Mary's women, and I am deter- 
mined to establish a Church school as the best means of building up 
my Diocese." 

Dr. Smedes was a man of genuine affection and love, a man of 
strength, greatly endued with a power of inspiring others. It is told 
of Thomas Arnold of Rugby that his personality was so ingrained into 
his scholars that one could tell tnem down in the Sandwich Islands, 
could recognize them by the spiritual stamp the master put upon 
them. It reminds us of our founder. Such was his force that every 
impress made was a reflection of himself, — for, as Bishop Cheshire 
says, "those formed by him caught from him the same holy enthusi- 
asm. He set the stamp of Christ and his Church upon the fresh and 
opening lives under his guidance." 



And as 



"Today with vision keen we pierce beyond 
The veil of sense to the high court of heaven 
Where this one man of God is standing victor, 
And as we yield thanksgiving and high praise 



we cannot help but say 



For all the good his faithful life hath wrought, 
"We thank God always for the blessed dead 
And for the noble works that follow him." 



The St. Mary's Muse 19 



St. Mary's 

Annie Huske Robinson, '17, Sigma Lambda. 

Why is it that St. Mary's is what it is ? Why is it that it means 
more to us than any other school ever has or ever could mean ? Why 
is it that it is unique ? It is because of the spirit of the place, dis- 
tinctive and characteristic. 

First, the aims and ideals of the school and the St. Mary's life are 
such that it has a greater opportunity of giving to its students the 
things that endear it to the hearts of all who are connected with it. 
a The main enterprise of the world for splendor and extent is the 
upbuilding of character." This main enterprise has been from the 
first that of St. Mary's. Here the aim is to devote, first, attention 
to the development of character, and next, to learning and study as a 
means for the attainment of this higher end. Thus we see that St. 
Mary's is not a school where a cut and dried curriculum is mapped 
out and put down for every student to accept if she enters the School ; 
it is not a place where the individual must suit herself to a pre- 
scribed course ; St. Mary's is a place where we learn to appreciate 
more the fullness of life. We are treated here as individuals ; we 
are regarded as human elements to be moulded into shape ; and our 
special needs and inclinations are respected, and courses suited to us, 
not we to the courses. What the great colleges of our country strive 
hardest to acquire today we already have, and have had from the very 
first, and that is, the human interest in the work. The great cry in 
the large colleges is for the humanizing of knowledge ; that is, the 
great effort is to bring it to bear upon life, to establish a point of 
contact between the intellectual and the social. One of our graduates 
of last year who is now in college expressed just this combination of 
the two that exists here when she said in writing to us, "You know, 
I like college, but somehow it is not so ideal as St. Mary's." The 
principal thing conducive to this at St. Mary's is the closeness of 
relationship and the intimacy and friendliness of feeling that exist 
between teachers and students. In few schools do teachers and pupils 
live in the same buildings and eat at the same table as is the case 
here. Teachers and students enter into school activities with equal 



20 The St. Mart's Muse 

interest and enjoyment. Even in the classroom we do not feel that 
we are machines to respond when a button is pressed. We feel rather 
as if we and the teacher are human beings working together to accom- 
plish certain things for our good. The kindly and sympathetic in- 
terest shown on the part of the school wins our hearts, we feel that 
all that could be done is done to make our school days the happiest 
days of our life. Think of Hallowe'en at St. Mary's ! Think of our 
Thanksgiving and Easter celebrations ! Think of our Christmas 
entertainments, and of that most delightful and enjoyable event of 
all, the faculty surprise, "Alice in Wonderland" ! • Can we doubt 
St. Mary's love for us ? Is there any wonder that we return that 
love seven-fold and seize upon every opportunity of signifying our 
love and devotion to our Alma Mater as we do today % 

But I do not wish to give the impression that the "good times" are 
all that St. Mary's gives us. They are rather rewards for work well 
done when the day is finished. We grant that there are certain lines 
along which constructive work should be done, but at the same time 
we acknowledge no low standard of scholarship, for our graduates 
who go on to further study find no difficulty in holding their own. 
They write rather to the opposite effect, saying that they have never 
forgotten certain things learned here, things of inestimable use to 
them in later years, and it cannot be disproved that we unconsciously 
absorb far more from our studies here than we realize at the time. 
Knowledge acquired in this manner is made usable and alive, and 
is of the greater value for that reason. 

There is a second thing about St. Mary's that cannot be overlooked 
when we would try to tell why it means so much to us, and that is, 
the place itself, the beauties of which I need not dwell upon. But 
there is about the beautiful historic walls of St. Mary's that have 
stood here practically unchanged for three-quarters of a century an 
ennobling and unlifting influence. The feeling that an individual 
derives from knowing that he is born of an ancient and illustrious 
race and from being familiar with the walls and trees that speak 
of the past no less than the present, making both full of images of 
greatness, this feeling in an inferior degree should and does belong 
to the daughters of St. Mary's. We know that ours is. a noble heri- 



The St. Mary's Muse 21 

tage, that there is no school in the country with greater or more ven- 
erable traditions, and few of as long a historic record as ours. There- 
fore we are proud to belong to St. Mary's, proud to be known as St. 
Mary's girls, and are inspired to do our best to preserve her ideals 
and to try some day to make her proud of us. 

But all that I have said about the life at St. Mary's, about the 
influence of the place itself, does not exactly describe the spirit that 
makes St. Mary's St. Mary's. So lastly, what is it that has given life 
to St. Mary's, has quickened its spirit across the years of the past ? 
Is it not life itself, the life of all of those who have spent themselves 
here in the service of others ? This it is which has given to the School 
a vitality and an ever widening power making for righteousness. It 
was said of a great teacher once that all who came under his sway 
received stimulation, virtue, from contact with a spirit earnestly at 
work in the world. From those who have earnestly been at work 
here a power has been transmitted to others until we, compassed 
about by so great a cloud of witnesses, feel that St. Mary's is a 
symbol of a certain spiritual force, a force which is bigger and 
greater and finer than any one personality, being the sublimation of 
those whose lives were service, having love to spend. 

May we of today never shut from our hearts and minds this spirit 
of St. Mary's, but valuing with all reverence our heritage as daugh- 
ters of St. Mary's, put forth our strength that this great spirit may 
never grow less high, less pervasive, less mighty. 



The Power of Persorjality 

Aline Hughes, '18, A P. 

Carlyle thinks that universal history is the history of the world's 
great personalities which have, so to speak, created the spirits of the 
ages in which they lived. Emerson thinks that each age creates for 
itself a great personality which represents the age. However we may 
feel on this subject, whether the personality creates the age or vice 
versa, we can but realize and wonder at that great, mysterious, mag- 
netic force which enables one man or woman to control, partly or 
wholly, the actions and thoughts of other human beings. We cannot 



22 The St. Mary's Muse 



understand this strange, wonderful power; we marvel, and are 
amazed at it, yet we realize that it is, that it exists, indeed that it 
influences every one of us in our almost every thought and action. 
If this influence, this force, be for evil, we all know, from experi- 
ence and hearsay, what it may accomplish. But when it is for good ! 
You remember, each of you, I know, how the wistaria on East Rock 
grows fuller and fuller, and more and more graceful daily under the 
spring sun, until it is a purple magnet to all eyes. Yet not even 
the wistaria and roses of our beloved St. Mary's blossom out into such 
pure loveliness as an innocent nature led on and influenced by the 
power of a strong, true personality. 

And what, we may ask, is personality 1 It is not merely knowl- 
edge, not merely emotion, but it seems to me it is a combination of 
strong, clear insight, and truth itself. Think of the great people 
in history, those who have led others, have they not been above all 
true to themselves ? Skipping over those obviously great ones, such 
as Csesar, Augustus, Napoleon, etc., think of those whose influence 
has perhaps been wider and more beneficial than even these. 

There is no field which affords wider scope for the influence of 
personal magnetism than the field of teaching, and indeed this field 
is well populated with noble example. In England there is a noted 
example in Dr. Thomas Arnold of Rugby, and in our own country 
we can cite numbers of examples, such as Dr. Norworthy of Teachers 
College, Columbia University, and dear Dean DuBose of Sewanee. 

And it was to our founder, Dr. Aldert Smedes, that Bishop Atkin- 
son made a noble tribute which has often been quoted since then. He 
said: "If I were called upon to say what individual has exerted for 
many years, and is now exerting, the most beneficial influence upon 
the people of this State, I should feel bound to express the conviction 
that it is not this or that statesman, or this or that soldier, or this or 
that preacher, but the man who has successfully trained up so many 
maidens and so many matrons to be themselves useful and happy in 
their respective spheres and to diffuse around them the incalculable 
benefits of womanly intelligence and refinement. While many excel- 
lent persons have labored for this end, and with gratifying success, 
he who, in my judgment at least, has accomplished the most, is the 



The St. Mary's Muse 23 

principal of St. Mary's School." I believe no girl ever left St. 
Mary's during the rectorship of Dr. Smecles who did not carry with 
her through life the firm impress of the character of that noble 
fatherly priest. You who knew him, have you ever forgotten him, 
or have you utterly separated yourself from the influence, noble and 
fine, which he exerted over you ? Have you not been impelled to 
many a good deed or kindly word through thought of him ? 

Bishop Cheshire, in his sermon at the semi-centennial celebration 
of the founding of St. Mary's, said: "St. Mary's School, in its 
foundation and first work, is but the expression of the life and charac- 
ter of its founder, the Rev. Aldert Smedes." 

Not only the first Dr. Smedes, but also a son and successor, Dr. 
Bennett Smedes, is responsible for the most part for St. Mary's even 
as it stands today. With such a strong and splendid foundation how 
could St. Mary's fail to have a personality all its own ? That it has a 
strong personality you must all know. Did you not feel it, from the 
time when you were first a Freshman or a "baby Prep" until as a 
Senior you left it to long for the dear old days again, and truly to 
realize for the first time what St. Mary's had meant in your life ? 
"Was there ever any school like St. Mary's," we ask, "with its dear 
originalities, its jolly entertainments, its Easter Egg rush and its 
final School Party, when the personality of the Senior Class as a 
whole is measured by the number of tears shed V I suppose none of 
us while here, dancing happily in the parlor, lolling in the Grove 
to the tune of banjo and guitar, rushing from class to class, clutching 
at the ever elusive pencil while wildly cramming the last French verb 
before crossing the French room threshold ; I suppose none of us then, 
I say, realized the true worth of St. Mary's or the full influence of 
those who have made our Alma Mater. How many have there been 
who have left indelible impressions here ! How many who invari- 
ably will figure in our picture of St. Mary's ! You can see them now 
in a long line : Dr. Aldert Smedes, Dr. Bennett Smedes, Miss Katie, 
Mrs. Iredell, Miss Battle, Miss McVea, Miss Thomas, and many, 
many more, for St. Mary's gives to us girls of today a rich heritage 
and high standard of personalities. There is no need for me to go 
into detail as to these. You know them as well, if not better, than 



24 The St. Mary's Muse 



I. You know as well as I how great a part of St. Mary's is our dear 
Miss Katie, our truest St. Maryite. None of you need me to detail 
the successors of our honor Alumna, Miss McVea. And though Miss 
Thomas is not herself an Alumna, she has become such 'a fundamental 
and necessary part of St. Mary's that the thought of her absence fills 
all of us who are coming back with dismay. 

But however great may be the brilliance shed over St. Mary's by 
its "Big Lights," if we may use this undignified term in speaking of 
them, there is one thing which ought to be fully realized, and which 
we, the girls of '17, wish to bring especially to your minds and hearts 
today. This is that you, each one of you, has been and is a part of 
our St. Mary's; that whether you have made a scientific discovery, 
written a book, or merely in your home have tried to live up to the 
high principles of St. Mary's as laid down by Dr. Smedes and his 
successors — whichever of these you have done, you have nevertheless 
left your impression here to be a part of the personality of the School ; 
for what is the personality of St. Mary's but the composite character 
of those who have lived here ? 

No true personality, then, is ever wasted, but lives on in those 
people or things which it has touched or moulded. Then it is left to 
us, aided by the noble example of others in the world at large and 
in our own School, to be above all true, true to ourselves and to the 
right in all things, and to wield this self-created power of truth and 
honor as befits worthy, loyal, and loving daughters of St. Mary's. 



SEVENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION 
St. MlART's School 




THE LEADER AND HER ATTENDANTS 

Eleanor Relyea, '17 

Estelle Ravenel, '19 Katheeine Deane, '18 



THE ART DEPARTMENT IN THE FESTIVAL 
"Living Pictures" 




"LILACS" (Watts) 
Miss Elizabeth Hughes 



THE ART DEPARTMENT IN THE FESTIVAL 
"Living Pictures'' 




"INFANTA MARGHERITA" (Velasquez) 
Miss Nancy Lay 



THE ART DEPARTMENT IN THE FESTIVAL 
"Living Pictures" 




"MONA LISA" (Leonardo da Vinci) 
Miss Jane Ruffin 



THE ART DEPARTMENT IN THE FESTIVAL 
"Living pictures" 




"PIERROT" (Robaudi) 
Miss Nettie Carol Daniels 



THE ART DEPARTMENT IN THE FESTIVAL 
"Living Pictures" 







THE DUCHESS OF DEVONSHIRE (Gainsborough) 
Miss Louise Arbogast 




St. Mary's 

75th Anniversary Festival 



The St. Mary's Muse 25 



A Sacred Spot 



(The Winning Original Poem in the Anniversary Contest.) 
Henrietta Morgan, '18, Epsilon Alpha Pi. 

Todays have glided into yesterdays, 

And years have passed, swift-winged — three-score and ten of them and five 

A host of nights have brought their stars and shades, 

A host of days their "good to be alive": — 

Some gay with Summer's flowers and light, 

Some dark with Winter's long, gray shroud. 

Still among the dim, blue Southern hills 

There lies a spot whose birth is lost in days of Auld Lang Syne, 

A School, a seat of Virtue, Love, and Truth; 

To those who lingered once about it, now a wayside shrine, 

A place to honor days of long ago. 

Why does this spot survive the flight of years? 

And many youthful steps still travel 'long its cool green paths? 

The oaks stand forth in kingly strength and might, 

Dark and sharp amid the glow of Winter Even's sunset baths, 

Or still and peaceful 'neath the wealth of spring, 

The greenness of the dark, dim Summer wood. 

As thus they nestle 'round this spot — this School- 
How have those oaks stood straight and tall 'mid boasting roars of winds? 
The things of God — they last forever, — 

The Rock of Worship, bound with clinging vines of truth; — 
That's why the oaks and School have stood together. 

Ye, who come from far and near to bring 

Your love for what is bound about with cords of Truth, 

Bethink you of your common sod: — 

Behold the Stars and Stripes of this, your Native Land, 

And see your School, your Country, and your God. 



26 The St. Mary's Muse 



Three Sceoes From the Life of St. Mary's 



(The Winning Sketch in the Anniversary Competition.) 
Katharine Parker Drane, '18. 



The Opening of St. Mary's. 

On the 12th of May, 1842, a bright sunshiny morning, Rev. Alciert 
Smedes threw open the door of St. Mary's for the first day of school. 
The opening service was held in the parlor, and Ave can imagine the 
scene that took place : Rev. Aldert Smedes, tall, graceful, and im- 
pressive, stood before a little band of thirteen boarding pupils and 
about an equal number of day scholars, with those who were to help 
him in his work — Madame Clement, Miss Maria Thompson, Miss 
Long, and Mr. and Mrs. Brandt — and led them in a short service, 
the first service at St. Mary's. Think of the services that have taken 
place since that May morning so long ago ! And does it not make 
you love and admire the earnest man who had faith to undertake 
the establishment of a Church school for girls, thus making it pos- 
sible for the many things which St. Mary's has done and stood for — 
is doing and standing for ? 

St. Mary's then consisted of Main Building and the two rock 
houses. The ground floor of East Rock was soon fitted up for a 
Chapel, and services were held there until some time before 1857 
when the present Chapel was built. After that the ground floor of 
East Rock was used as the Art room with two small bedrooms on the 
same floor. West Rock was used as a dormitory. In the Main 
Building the parlor was the same room as the present parlor, and 
above that were the rooms of the Rector and his family. The In- 
firmary was the room over the School Room, while the present School 
Room was used as a recreation room. The upper floor of Main Build- 
ing was a dormitory. 

As no records have been preserved of the happenings of the first 
weeks of the life of the School, we have to pass over them, but not 
without imagining to ourselves that perhaps, after all, those thirteen 



The St. Mart's Muse 27 



little girls said and felt very much as we ourselves did and felt our 
first weeks at St. Mary's. For who can look back to that first week 
without recalling the strangeness of everything, and the times when 
those big lumps just would come up in the throat at the thought of 
home ? 

Still the work of St. Mary's had begun, and in the years that fol- 
lowed Dr. Smedes succeeded in establishing the School on a firmer 
and firmer basis. 

II 

Leaves from My Diaky. 

August 3, 1863. 
Father and I have just reached St. Mary's after a long and tire- 
some journey. We left our home in Salisbury early day before yes- 
terday morning. As we were to drive to Salem in our carriage, 
mother decided to go that far with us ; for it was at Salem that we 
were to take the coach. It was a long trip, but I was glad every 
minute of it, and the end of it came too soon, when I had to tell 
mother good-bye. We did not have much time to wait, as the stage 
was about ready to leave. They stored my trunk away in the boot 
and father and I climbed in. It was fun at first, but I soon grew 
weary of looking out of the window and amused myself by reading 
about those funny Fezziwigs in "Pickwick Papers." We traveled 
on day and night and got our meals at the regular stopping places. 
Every time we entered a town, our arrival was heralded by a lusty 
blow of the horn, and people crowded all around, eager to hear the 
latest news of the war. We reached Durham station and father told 
me that our journey was almost finished. We finally reached Raleigh 
and rode out to St. Mary's in the Yarborough omnibus. Father left 
me right after we got here, and how hard it was to tell him good-bye ! 
I tried not to cry ; but I don't know when I shall see him again, and 
he returns to join his company tomorrow. 

August 4, 1863. 
I slept in a long room last night with many little beds in it. A 
very mischievous girl next to me told me that her name was Polly 
Jumpup, but that sounds like a mighty queer name to me, and I 



28 The St. Mary's Muse 

believe she is just trying to fool me. I have met Dr. Smedes and I 
love him already. Miss Evertson scares me 'most to death, and she 
is so strict and sarcastic ! But I saw one girl run up and sit on her 
knee, so maybe she won't be so stern after I know her. I went to 
classes today, and I am going to work hard! 

August 15, 1863. 
I have been so busy that I have not had time to write in my diary 
for a long time. This afternoon we sewed and knitted for the soldiers 
of "The Ellis Light Artillery," and we are going to do it every Satur- 
day afternoon. I am learning how to knit, and I am getting on finely. 
I dropped only ten stitches this afternoon ! 

October 20, 1863. 
Isn't it funny how you get used to things ? If I had thought at the 
beginning of this dreadful war that the time would come when I 
would possess but three dresses, with two of them homespun and the 
other calico, why I think I should have died right then and there. 
But we girls are just as happy as if we had on silks and satins. We 
lead an uneventful life, but we do have a good time. Every after- 
noon we play ball in the grove at recess, and we get so hot and mussed 
up that Madame always scolds us when we rush breathless in to 
French recitation, which comes directly after recess. ]^one of us 
ever thinks about grumbling when we have sorghum and bread time 
and again. Why, if it is good enough for Dr. and Mrs. Smedes to 
eat — and they are two of the best people in the world — I know that 
we should be glad to eat it. And sorghum tastes mighty good at 
those candy stews Mrs. Smedes has. 

October 23, 1863. 
One of the girls told me that Mildred Lee, daughter of our beloved 
Robert E. Lee, is coining tomorrow. I know we shall hear lots of 
interesting things from her. Betty Meade told Miss Evertson that 
she was coming, and all she said was, "Suppose she does come, she's 
no more than an ordinary mortal like the rest of us." But, anyhow, 
I know I shall be proud to be with her. And Mrs. Jefferson Davis, 
who has been here all summer with her four children, is expecting 



The St. Mary's Muse 29 

to leave soon. People come from far and near to receive the warm 
hospitality which Dr. Smedes so kindly offers. 

July 20, 1864. 
ISTever shall I forget this Sunday. Yesterday we knew that a fierce 
battle was raging, and lots of the girls had near relatives in the army. 
Our dear Dr. Smedes's son, Edward, was with the forces engaged in 
battle. This morning, right before the end of the service, when Dr. 
Smedes was pronouncing the benediction, a messenger appeared at 
the door of the Chapel. We all guessed that he had brought bad 
news as we marched out of the Chapel. Madame Gouye went to the 
messenger and got the telegram from him, sending it to Dr. Smedes 
by his little daughter. Soon we learned that the telegram announced 
that Edward Smedes had been killed in the battle. How brave our 
Rector has been through all his sadness ! This is the second of his 
sons to die for the Cause. 

April 14, 1865. 
Oh, I am so scared and I want to go home ! Those horrid old 
Yankees are camped right out in our grove ! I don't know what they 
will do to us. I saw one of the soldiers walking around, and I just 
walked up to him and I told him what I thought of him for coming 
up here and scaring us so. 

Ill 

St. Mary's School, Ealeigh, N". C, April 26, 1893. 
My Dear Little Daughter: 

I am enjoying my visit to your sister Elizabeth very much, and I 
wish that you could be here with me. Elizabeth is well and happy 
and sends her best love to you. I am going to tell you some of the 
things she is doing as you will be here at school in a few years, and 
I know you would like to know what Elizabeth does "off at school." 

When I arrived last Friday Elizabeth was very glad to see me, 
but her mind seemed to be very preoccupied. I at last found out that 
she was thinking of the dreaded abstract of the Friday's Chapel 
address that she had to write. When she finished that, I thought 
everything would be all right, but she told me that the most trying 



30 The St. Maey's Muse 

event of the whole week took place on Friday afternoon, when they 
had the "reading-out." I decided to slip in quietly and observe the 
"reading-out." All of the teachers and students assembled in the 
School Room; the teachers sat on the platform in the front of the 
room. One by one they rose and read out the week's honor roll ; and 
you will be glad to know that Elizabeth's name was read out by all 
her teachers. 

Yesterday afternoon it was very cool, it almost felt like a day in 
early winter, — and I wish you could have been here to see the funny 
sight of Walking Hour. When the bell rang girls came running 
from the Rocks and Main Building, and every girl had on a shawl ! 
Red shawls, blue shawls, gray shawls — every kind and color of shawl 
imaginable. They walked up and down all around the Grove, and 
they looked like so many nuns in their long shawls — but nuns would 
not have on such gaily colored wraps, would they ? I happened to 
be down near the gate, and a man. evidently a stranger in Raleigh, 
stopped and politely asked if this were the Insane Asylum! 

Rising bell rings at six o'clock, and we have dinner at half-past 
three. I know you would like the way we have luncheon at noon. 
The girls all file down to the store-room in a long procession, and 
there they find four big waiters, two filled with apples and two filled 
with piles of crackers, three in each pile ; then the housekeeper hands 
an apple and three crackers to each girl, and, as a rare treat, there 
is cheese to go with the crackers. Then the girls may go out to the 
Grove if they choose and eat lunch with their "chums." 

Elizabeth rooms in Miss Kate McKimmon's Dormitory. The 
girls call the dormitory "McKimmonsville," and they do have so 
much fun in their community. She is looking forward to May Day 
when they are going to have a picnic and crown the oldest inhabitant 
"Queen." The next time I write I will tell you all about that. 

You and Aunt Xancy can fix up a box and send it to surprise Eliza- 
beth. "Getting boxes" is one of the very best things that can happen 
to a school girl, and the bigger the box, the better it is. 

With a heart full of love for my little girl. 

Yottb Mother. 



The St. Mary's Muse 31 



A Day at Old St. Mary's 

Ruth Newbold Vail. 

The bells are ringing a call to prayer, 
'Tis morn at old St. Mary's. 
The girls come dancing down the stair, 
A new day at St. Mary's. 

New lessons learned, new duties done, 
Small victories made, and triumphs won, 
Each girl her little task complete 
On this day — at St. Mary's. 

Again the bell at evening rings, 
Each girl her place to march and sings 
As marching to the Chapel brings 
Her faith — at old St. Mary's. 

You see them there, each in her place, 
Bowed head, clasped hands, and prayerful face, 
Weaving the crown of sweet womanhood's grace 
In the Chapel — at old St. Mary's. 

Tree shadows, moonlight sparkling bright, 
Sweet laughter, girlish forms flash white, 
It's recreation hour — and night, 
Now, — at old St. Mary's. 



The Out-of-town Guests for the Anniversary Celebration 

The following list of guests from out of Raleigh who were present 
for the Anniversary is, we regret, far from complete: 

Miss Harriet E. Bowen Chapel Hill 

Miss Emma Bouknight Johnston, S. C. 

Miss Violet Bray Tryon 

Miss Mary Brown Butler Henderson 

Miss Sue Collier Goldsboro 

Mrs. H. G. Cooper Oxford 

Miss Nan Clark Tarboro 

Miss Mildred Cuningham Madison 

Miss Annie S. Cameron Hillsboro 

Miss Sophronia Cooper Fayetteville 

Miss Elizabeth Corbitt Henderson 



32 The St. Mary's Muse 

Miss Laura Clark Scotland Neck 

Miss Kate Cheshire Tarboro 

Miss Henrietta Collins Hillsboro 

Mrs. Collier Cobb Chapel Hill 

Miss Augusta Divine Rocky Mount 

Rev. Dr. and Mrs. R. B. Drane Edenton 

Miss Dorothy Fairley Durham 

Miss Sarah Fenner Selma 

Mrs. Ada Rogers German Concord 

Miss Frances Geitner Hickory 

Miss Matilda Hancock New Bern 

Miss Ruth Hairston Cooleemee 

Mrs. Stamps Howard Tarboro 

Miss Lanie Hales Wilson 

Miss Rena Harding Washington 

Mrs. Lena B. Hillman Nashville, Tenn. 

Mrs. J. G. deR. Hamilton Chapel Hill 

Miss Mattie Josey Scotland Neck 

Mrs. Howard Jones Warrenton 

Miss Emma Karrer Mayodan 

Mrs. James Kenan Wilmington 

Miss Emily Kenan Wilmington 

Miss Rebecca Kyle Norfolk, Va. 

Mrs. Carl Korn Cape Charles, Va. 

Mrs. W. E. Lindsay Spartanburg, S. C. 

Miss Nannie Lamb Scotland Neck 

Miss Lizzie H. Lee, 2d Durham 

Miss Carrie Helen Moore Littleton 

Miss Emilie Watts McVea Sweetbrier, Va. 

Mrs. Carrie Carr Mitchell Asheville 

Miss Melba McCullers Clayton 

Miss Susie Mclver Cheraw, S. C. 

Miss Katharine MacNair .Wilson 

Mrs. John M. Manning Durham 

Miss Rita Meares Ridgeway, S. C. 

Mrs. Miller (Rosa Battle) Goldsboro 

Mrs. Arthur R. Moore Brunswick, N. J. 

Mrs. Cameron. 

Miss Ellen Mott Dixondale, Va. 

Mrs. Maurice O'Neil Henderson 

Mrs. James Pender Tarboro 

Miss Frances Pusey Durham 

Mrs. O. M. Royster Hickory 

Mrs. W. J. Robards Henderson 

Mrs. W. W. Robards Charlotte 

Mrs. W. E. Stitt Charlotte 

Miss Fannie M. Stallings Suffolk, Va. 



The St. Mary's Muse 33 



Mrs. Harry Smith Weldon 

Miss Mary Clark Smith Roanoke Rapids 

Miss Josephine Smith Rocky Mount 

Miss Elizabeth Tarry Townesville 

Mrs. J. M. Vail Edenton 

Mrs. W. L. Wall Hillsboro 

Miss Josephine Wilson Goucher College, Baltimore, Md. 

Mrs. D. B. Wesson Longmeadow, Mass. 

Mrs. W. J. White Warrenton 



SOME ANNIVERSARY GREETINGS FROM ALUMNAE 
UNABLE TO BE PRESENT 



An Anniversary Wish for St. Mary's 



A 

Tip-top 

Wish for a 

Tip-top School 

That tip-top School is you 

May all the tippest-toppest things 

Be yours, the long years through. 

Elizabeth Waddill, 1908. 

("Elizabeth Waddill," '08, of Cheraw, S. C, was a valued editor of the 
Muse in her St. Mary's days. She spends much of her time now in church 
work, and with "Kate Meares," '03, is this summer, as they have been for 
several summers, at work in one of the missions near Morganton.) 

Fayetteville, N. C, May 12, 1917. 
My Dear Me. C. 

To the Faculty and friends, old girls and new (I'm sure no one 
minds being called an "Old Girl" today) — greetings: 

When your letter came asking me to contribute to the Alumna? 
Muse, and I realized what it meant, I was scared to, just as scared 
as a little child who, hearing sounds of revelry below in the evening, 
sneaks down in his night-clothes, and suddenly finding the company 
a trifle too distinguished for him, tries to hide behind somebody. It 
3 



34 The St. Maby's Muse 



was worse than when I used to get a little green slip reading : "Miss 
B., you are requested to report to the Lady Principal's office between 
8 and 9." And so I didn't do it ! 

But I think about St. Mary's often, and my past with her is blended 
into one happy memory. I think you get a clearer vision of St. 
Mary's when you are out than while you're there. I think that's for 
two reasons. First, because there were times when, sheltered, re- 
stricted ( ?) sometimes within its walls or grounds you felt about it 
as a roommate of mine once said, "I'd just as soon be in the peni- 
tentiary except for the disgrace." Sometimes we can't see clearly 
what's nearest to us — our nose, for instance. And, secondly, because 
after you leave St. Mary's you hear more about it from other people. 
I mean you are more apt to get people's true opinion of it. Because 
occasionally some one will begin a long speech on the subject, and 
after they've delivered themselves suddenly pause with an air of 
saying, "Oh, I beg your pardon, he's some relation of yours, I be- 
lieve." 

So they give St. Mary's credit, or blame, in the outside world for 
paying attention to the things of the surface. And it makes me want 
to talk to them about hats ! Girls usually do, don't they ? (And not 
only talk about them, but think about them, fret about them, and 
sometimes even, between you and me and the gate-post, aren't too 
good to cry about them! so I'm told.) However I'm using the term 
hats, not in the sense of those alluring, pocket-smoking features of a 
woman's wardrobe, but as representing the more surface-like phase 
of our existence. 

Is the diamond any the less true for being a cut stone ? Is it any 
the less an instrument for writing on other surfaces because of its 
own polished corners ? And surely that's one of our highest claims 
for St. Mary's : the influence of her daughters, and their adapta- 
bility ! It seems to me a woman's soul can be as clear as crystal, 
her heart as true as steel, and her head as logical as a man's, even 
though she wears a charming hat, does society, and is not erudite. 
And I'm perfectly sure that a society woman, a Solomon, a mental 
and physical acrobat, all combined, is not too capable to fill a modern 



The St. Mary's Muse 35 

woman's place in her community. Indeed, I think we need the tra- 
ditional St. Mary's girl, with the spirit of and love for her Alma 
Mater. 

Here's appreciation for her past, love for her present, and hope 
for her future. From 

Yours sincerely, Margaret S. Broadfoot. 

("Margaret Broadfoot," '12, was also an editor of the Muse in her St. 
Mary's days, remembered for her editorials. She was also Class Essayist. 
She is now a teacher at her home, Fayetteville.) 

Durham Business School 
Durham, 1ST. C. 

May 12, 1917. 
St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C. 

My Dear Alma Mater : — I regret exceedingly that I cannot be 
present at the seventy-fifth anniversary of Founders' Day at St. 
Mary's College. I recall that I was a member of the Business Class 
of 1905. 

It gives me great pleasure to express to the school, and especially 
to dear Miss Lee, the deep appreciation I feel towards the institu- 
tion for its influence upon my life. I am ever grateful that I ever 
attended St. Mary's. The success I am now enjoying in my business 
I owe to the instruction received while a student in the school. 

Trusting that this may be a glorious anniversary, and that the 
College may continue to enjoy the increased success it so richly de- 
serves, I am, Sincerely yours, 

Carrie Claytor Lednum. 
(Mrs. Walter Lee Lednum.) 

(Mrs. Lednum is the President of the Durham Business School, which she 
established.) 



36 The St. Mary's Muse 

To the St. Mary's Teachers of 1905-1908 

(With apologies to Horace.) 

You have builded yourselves monuments 
More lasting far than bronze, 
You have given to minds so eager 
The thoughts which can uplift. 
You have striven to make girls noble, 
And to give them wisdom true, 
And many a heart, dear teacher-folk, 
Has thanked you for your gift. 

May the interest you have ever shown 
And the guidance kind and strong, 
Which made the years we spent with 
You so wonderfully sweet, 
Bring to your hearts the happiness, 
The joy which is your due, 
And, with the love of those you've 
Taught, be each one's life replete. 

The Class of 1908. 
Per E. T. W. 

ANNIVERSARY MEETING OF THE CHARLOTTE ALUMNAE 

The Anniversary Meeting of the Charlotte Chapter of the Alumna?, 
which was engineered by Mrs. Watkins Robards (Sadie Root), the 
Chairman, and Miss Arabella Thomas, S. M. S., 191. ., the Secre- 
tary, was a decided success. The meeting was held at the residence 
of Mr. Jordan Thomas, all four of whose daughters — Florence (Mrs. 
Brent Drane), Sadie, Marie, and Arabella — have been enthusiastic 
St. Mary's girls. Mrs. Bickett was the guest of honor. 

The Charlotte Observer said of the meeting: 

The feature of the meeting of the Charlotte chapter of the St. Mary's 
College Alumnae Association was a talk given by Mrs. T. W. Bickett, who, 
with Governor Bickett, is the guest of Colonel and Mrs. W. E. Holt on North 
Tryon Street. 

The meeting, which was to have been held on May 12, was held on Satur- 
day, so that the honor guest of the occasion might be present. It was held 
in the home of the Misses Thomas, on Elizabeth Avenue. About forty 
Alumna? of St. Mary's were present. 

Rev. Francis Osborne, who has in charge the raising of the endowment 
fund of the College, spoke briefly, urging the Alumna? to assist in this work. 



The St. Mary's Muse 37 

The minutes of the last meeting were read by Miss Arabella Thomas, Secre- 
tary of the Charlotte Chapter of the Association. 

Mrs. W. L. Bynum read a clipping from The Observer, telling of the actions 
of the New York City Chapter of the Association, urging that a woman be 
elected upon the board of directors of St. Mary's. 

Following Mrs. Bickett's talk, tea was served. Mrs. Bickett said in part: 

"A school does not consist of books and buildings. Neither is it made up 
of a multiplied array of learned people, who are specialists in particular 
lines. The scene itself is found in that indefinable quantity that we call 
atmosphere. It is this quantity that throughout the generations has made 
St. Mary's dear to all her daughters. 

"She has sent those daughters forth into the world, bearing in their lives 
and forces — 

" 'Sweet records — 
" 'Promises as sweet.' 

"But while this atmosphere of the school determines its character, its repu- 
tation will largely depend upon physical equipment. Therefore the obligation 
rests heavily upon those of us who have tasted and found it good to leave 
nothing undone to so improve the equipment of St. Mary's that the modern 
girl will be attracted there and come under its sweet and holy atmosphere. 

"It is written, 'Seek ye first the kingdom of heaven and its righteousness, 
and all these things shall be added unto you.' 

"We believe that St. Mary's fulfills this requirement, and let it be our part 
to assume for her the necessary things of the world." 



38 The St. Mart's Muse 



IN THE INTEREST OF ST. MARY'S 

In connection with the celebration of the 75th Anniversary and 
the progress of the Campaign for the $250,000 Fund, Sunday, May 
6, was appointed by the Bishops of the Carolina Dioceses for special 
recognition of the interests of St. Mary's in all the churches of their 
Dioceses. 

The announcement sent out was as follows : 

TO ALL CHURCHES IN THE CAROLINA DIOCESES 

Sunday, May 6, to be Observed in the Interest of St. Mary's School 

Saturday, May 12, will be the 75th Anniversary of the opening of St. 
Mary's School. Many will attend, but only a small percentage of those inter- 
ested and benefited by the influence of St. Mary's School can accept the 
invitation to attend the celebration at the School on that date. Such a period 
of service, however, is worthy of the recognition of us all. So important 
an event should not be overlooked. The whole Church in the Carolinas should 
have an opportunity to give thanks for the evident and the manifold blessings 
to the Church that have flowed from St. Mary's. We should pray together 
with one heart and one voice for the continuing usefulness of the School, 
and especially for the prosperity of the movement inaugurated by the Trustees 
for its improvement and endowment. 

We therefore ask that on Sunday, May 6, the interests of St. Mary's School 
be recognized in all of our churches. 

In observing Sunday, May 6, we do not attempt to suggest a detailed pro- 
gram, but leave this to the judgment of the local congregation and the con- 
sideration of local conditions. A sermon on Christian Education would be 
appropriate. An announcement of the program enclosed, for May 12, would 
be helpful in stirring up interest in the gathering of friends and Alumnse at 
the School. An explanation of the necessity for the $250,000 fund and the 
plan of campaign would be timely, and certainly we can count on the use 
of the accompanying prayer, which has been set forth and authorized in our 
Diocese. Respectfully yours, 

Wm. A. Guerry, 
Bishop of South, Carolina. 

Jos. B. Cheshire, 
Bishop of North Carolina. 

Thos. C. Darst, 

Bishop of East Carolina. 

Junius M. Horner, 

Bishop of Asheville. 



The St. Mary's Muse 39 



Special Prayers 

The following prayers are authorized for use in the Diocese of 
North Carolina, South Carolina, Asheville, and East Carolina : 

A Prayer for St. Mary's School 

Almighty Father, whose mercy is over all Thy works, bless, we 
beseech Thee, with Thy Providential care, St. Mary's School and 
all schools and colleges of Christian education, and prosper all right 
efforts for their support. Help us in the work being done for the 
improvement and endowment of this School, to pray earnestly, to 
labor diligently, and to give generously. Grant to the teachers and 
the taught the light of Thy Holy Spirit to lead them into all truth 
and to build them up in Christian grace and character; for the sake 
of Thy Kingdom and the honor of Thy name, through Jesus Christ, 
our Lord : Amen. 

A Prayer for All Colleges and Schools 

Almighty and Eternal God, the source of light and life, whose 
fear is the beginning of wisdom, guide and illumine by Thy Holy 
Spirit the teachers and the taught in every school of good learning, 
that through knowledge of the truth and obedience to Thy will, they 
may be led to Thy service through Him who is the Eternal Truth, 
Thy Son, our Master, Jesus Christ : Amen. 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 

206- JO MASONIC TEMPLE 



Success in the Campaign for the Raising of the $250,000 
Fund to pay off the debt and provide additional new build- 
ings, and the beginning of an Endowment Fund is of the 
utmost importance to St. Mary's. 

Think of it, talk of it, and help in every way you can. 



B. W. JONES 


"You get them when promised" 


The 
Best in 


Horfrosi s Studio 

Masonic Temple 


Groceries 






"Workers in Artistic Photography" 


Phones 667-668 528 Hillsboro Street 





Advertisements 



Stationery, College Linen, Pennants, 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

JAMES E.THIEM 

Bell Phone 135 RALEIGH, N. 0. 

JOHNSON & BROUGHTON 
Good Things to Eat 

122 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 
Coal, Wood, Ice, Brick 

122 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. 0. 



H. STEINMETZ— FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 



CAROLINA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light and 
Power and Gas 

1376— BOTH PHONES— 1377 



WALK-OVER— The Shoe for You 
Walk-Over Shoe Shop 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

S. GLASS The Ladies' Store 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses 

and Children. Ready-made wearing apparel 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



Wm. Heller 

THE FOOTERY SHOP 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THE ALUMNAE ARE REMINDED 
that a complete Alumnce Register, which should include 
information about all past students of St. Mary's, is 
now in course of preparation for publication. 

Information for this Register is solicited. 



ATLANTIC FIKE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company Home Capital 

Safe, Secure, and Successful 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

R. S. BUSBEE, Secretary 

Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

Charles E. Johnson, Jr., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 



A Cafe 'which invites the patronage of 
ladies. The girls of St. Mary's will enjoy 
the beauty and convenience of our modern, 
■well-appointed dining- place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

Raleigh, N. C. 

THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 

GOLF, TENNIS, AND SPORTING GOODS 

MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
104 EAST HARGETT ST. Bell Phone 719 



Advertisements 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DRUG STORE 

Phones 228 



HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STOEE 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

The Big Hardware Men Raleigh, N. C. 



Base Balls, Basket Balls 
Tennis and Sporting Goods 



Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets. 


Call OLIYE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 

Phone 529 


PESCUD'S BOOK STOKE 

12 W. Hargett St. 


DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 


RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 


T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies. 
Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 



Subscriptions for the monthly Muse are very acceptable 
at all times. One dollar will bring the ten copies of the 
Muse published next after its receipt. 



PERRY'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington St. 


MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 
VISITING GARDS 


California Fruit Store, 111 Fayetteville St., Raleigh 

Fancy fruits and pure ice cream. Best equipped and most 
Sanitary ice cream factory in the state. Our cream is the 
"Quality Kind." Send us ynir orders. California Fruit 
Store, 111 Fayctteville Street. Vurnakes & Co., Props.. Raleigh 


BATES-ARRINGTON & COMPANY 
PURE FOOD GROCERIES 


CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY ENGRAVED 


HAYES & HALL— STUDIO 


Send for samples and prices 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
MILLINERY 


Edwards & Broughton Printing 
Company 


J. L. O'Quinn & Co. 

Florists 


L. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds 


Steel Die and Copper Plate Engrayers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 



Raleigh's Leading and Largest Hotel 



Dinners and Banquets a Specialty 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Co., Proprietors 



Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Co. 



COLLEGE 
JEWELRY 



128 Payetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



WATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. 
Picture Frames and Window Shades. 

SHOES! WHOSE? 
BERNARD L. CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street 

GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 



YOUNG & HUGHES 



Plumbers 

Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 



S. Wilmington Street 



C. D. ARTHUR City Market 
FISH AND OYSTERS 

ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

College Pennants, Pillows, Pictures, 

Frames, Novelties 

EOYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 
Made Fresh Every Day 



OUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tick- 
ets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, as well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
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Location Central for the Carolinas. 

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St. Marts School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

75th ANNUAL SESSION" BEGAN SEPTEMBER 15, 1916. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGAN JANUARY 25, 1917. 



1. THE COLLEGE 

2. THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
St. Mary's \ g mE ART DEPARTMENT 

offers 

instruction I h- THE ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 

in these J 5> THE HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 
Departments 1 

6. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL 

7. THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 

In 1916-17 are enrolled 275 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 
Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 
Dormitories. 
Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 
slight to the Scholastic training. 
For catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, D. C. L., 

Rector. 

EDWARDS ft BROUGHTON PRINTING CO.. RALEISH N. C. 



M. jfWarp's illume 

Ealctfifj, J|. C. 



Commencement Jlunrfier 

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The St. Mary's Muse 

COMMENCEMENT NUMBER 

Vol. XXI July, 1917. No. v £ / 

Vouchsafe, we beseech Thee, O Lord, to prosper with Thy blessing the work 
of this School, and all other works designed to promote Thy Glory and the 
good of souls. Grant that all who serve Thee here, whether as teachers or 
learners, may set Thy Holy will ever before them and do such things as are 
pleasing in Thy sight, that so both the Church and Commonwealth of this 
land may be bettered by their studies, and they themselves may finally be 
made partakers of everlasting life through Jesus Christ, our Lord. Amen. 

Alma Mater 



(Tune: "Believe Me, if All Those Endearing Young Charms.") 

St. Mary's! wherever thy daughters may be 

They love thy high praises to sing, 
And tell of thy beauties of campus and tree, 

Around which sweet memories cling; 
They may wander afar, out of reach of thy name, 

Afar, out of sight of thy grove, 
But the thought of St. Mary's aye kindles a flame 

Of sweet recollections and love. 

Beloved St. Mary's! how great is our debt! 

Thou hast cared for thy daughters full well; 
They can never thy happy instructions forget, 

Nor fail of thy virtues to tell. 
The love that they feel is a heritage pure; 

An experience wholesome and sweet. 
Through fast rolling years it will grow and endure; 

Be a lamp and a guide to their feet. 

May the future unite all the good of thy past 

With the best that new knowledge can bring. 
Ever onward and upward thy course! To the last 

Be thou steadfast in every good thing. 
Generations to come may thy fair daughters still 

Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove 
And carry thy teachings — o'er woodland and hill — 

Of earnestness, wisdom, and love. 

H. E. H., 1905. 



161 The St. Mary's Muse 



THE 1917 COMMENCEMENT 



Coming in the same month with the celebration of the 75th Anni- 
versary, the 1917 Commencement ran the risk of being overshadowed 
by the more unusual event, but the exercises were very successful 
and made a deep impression on all present. There is no more salu- 
tary rule of the School than that which requires all the students to 
remain to the Commencement, and this makes the Commencement 
season a very distinct occasion for the whole School as well as for the 
graduating class. Bishop Darst and Governor Bickett were the 
special speakers for this Commencement, and both made deep and 
lasting impressions. Bishop Darst in particular, at the Sunday serv- 
ices and again on Commencement Day, struck just the St. Mary's 
note in his addresses. 

The Commencement Progran) 

Saturday, May 26 
8:30 p.m. Annual Recital of the Elocution Department in the Auditorium. 

Sunday, May 27 

11:00 a.m. Commencement Sermon in the Chapel by the Rt. Rev. Thos. C. 

Darst, D.D., Bishop of East Carolina. 
5:00 p.m. Alumnse Service in the Chapel. 

Monday, May 28 
11:00 a.m. Class Day Exercises in the Grove. 
3 : 00 p. m. Annual Exhibit of the Art Department in the Studio. 
4:30 p.m. Annual Alumnae Meeting in the Parlor. 
8:30 p. m. Annual Concert in the Auditorium. 
9 : 30 p. m. Rector's Reception in the Parlor. 

Tuesday, May 29 

11:00 a.m. Graduating Exercises in the Auditorium. 

Annual Address by Hon. T. W. Bickett, Governor of North 

Carolina. 
Closing Exercises in the Chapel. 



The St. Mary's Muse 165 

SATURDAY NIGHT 
The Annual Recital of the Elocution Department 

According to the custom the Commencement season was ushered 
in by the work of the Elocution Department in the Auditorium before 
a large and enthusiastic audience, assisted by pupils of the physical 
training classes. 

Miss Florence Davis, the Director of the Department, has made a 
very enviable reputation by the character of these Recitals at past 
Commencements when she has usually put on a Shakespearean play, 
but if anything she surpassed herself this year when she offered a 
program of two short imaginative plays. 

The first of these plays, "The Maker of Dreams," a one-act fan- 
tasy, showed a room in an old cottage, with Aline Hughes in the title 
part, Nancy Woolford as Pierrot, and Mary C. Wilson as Pierrette. 
The artistic costumes, the dainty acting, and the general spirit of the 
interpretation of a delightful fantasy that would have been readily 
spoiled by less effective interpretation but which charmed the audi- 
ence, best attests the skill with which each of the three young women 
played her part. 

The second of the plays, Marie Josephine Wilson's two-act Irish 
Fairy Play, "The Twig of Thorn," was even more imaginative and 
required even more delicate handling, but again the interpretation 
was excellent and reflected much credit on each member of the cast. 
The scene is laid in the cottage of Nessa Teig, an old Irish peasant 
woman, in County Galway, Ireland, in the year of the Great Famine. 
The part of Nessa Teig was taken by Rubie Thorn, a member of this 
year's graduating class, and she was one of the stars. Ethel Yates 
was also very good as Maurya, her neighbor. The heroine's part was 
that of Oonah, ISTessa's granddaughter, the young Dublin lassie who, 
coming to visit her grandmother, had unknowingly plucked the un- 
lucky twig of thorn and so incurred the disfavor of the Fairies, the 
"Little People." Alice Seed was very attractive, both in appearance 
and manner, in the part, as was Alice Latham, in the role of iEngus 
Arann, her young peasant lover. The part of the poetic hero of the 
play, the wandering poet, Aileel, who, in love with Oonah, was not 



166 The St. Maey's Muse 

able to win her favor, but who from love of her took upon himself 
the penalty of the Twig and bound himself to the "Little People" 
in return for the raising of the ill luck, thus leading to the happy 
marriage of Oonah and iEngus, was well taken by Penelope Stiles. 
Two very attractive dances were features of the play, the first a 
quadrille in which Oonah and Aileel with their visiting neighbors 
take part, the neighbors being Gertrude Merrimon, Ella Pender, 
Dorothea Brigham, Pauline Donlon, Ellen Lay, and Aline Taylor. 
In the second, little Miss Mary Strange Morgan as the Faery Child 
won much favor. The dancers were trained by Miss Mabel Barton, 
Director of Physical Training at the School. 

SUNDAY 

Commencement Sunday is ushered in by the celebration of the 
Holy Communion in the Chapel at 8 o'clock. Bishop Cheshire was 
the Celebrant, assisted by the Rector. 

At 11 o'clock Bishop Darst preached the Commencement Sermon, 
and at the 5 o'clock service in the evening he again spoke. 

The following brief account from the News and Observer outlines 
the main points of the Commencement Sermon, a sermon striking in 
its beauty of expression and in its effective personal appeal to every 
member of the large congregation present. 

In the quiet hush of the little Chapel, where all that is best and highest 
in the life of St. Mary's centers, The Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, Bishop of 
the Diocese of East Carolina, preached the Baccalaureate Sermon Sunday 
morning to the graduating class. It was more of a heart-to-heart talk from 
the Bishop to the girls than a deep and learned discourse. The Bishop chose 
for his text Hebrews 6:1 — "Let us press on unto full growth." The develop- 
ment of one's highest and best ideals and the way to attain one's place in 
God's great scheme of development of the world, was the subject the Bishop 
chose to give the girls as his parting message as they are leaving the School 
for the larger life outside. 

Life without a vision, Bishop Darst said, is life without a purpose. There 
can be no real growth without a vision, not a will-o'-the-wisp, idle dream, but 
a vision of the real purpose God has for each one, a vision such as Abraham 
had of old and like that of the carpenter of Judea on the shores of the Sea 
of Galilee. 

Before one can press on to that full growth, the Bishop said, it is necessary, 
first, to get rid of selfishness which stands in the way of the progress of so 
many men. 



The St. Mary's Muse 167 

Faithfulness to the things intrusted to us is also necessary before one can 
attain unto the full growth. The reward of Jesus Christ is promised to those 
who are faithful. 

"The world needs faithful men," said the Bishop. "So few can do the big 
things. It may be your part and mine to lay the foundation stones where the 
world does not see them. The country needs faithfulness. Don't treat lightly 
the chance to be of service during the summer." And, above all, there must 
be consecration in order to press on unto full growth. 

In his travels through his Diocese, Bishop Darst said he finds many St. 
Mary's girls standing in the outposts witnessing for Christ. 

The collection on Sunday morning was for the relief of the Armen- 
ian and Syrian sufferers and amounted to $57.40. 

MONDAY 
11:00 a. n). : Class Day Exercises ir> the Grove 

The lowering skies of Monday morning — Class Day — found many 
people halting between two opinions, the desire in general for the 
much-needed rain and the hopes of the Seniors for fair weather, but 
at 11 o'clock the exercises were opened by the usual procession of 
white-clad girls marching into the circle from beyond West Rock, 
class by class, singing the School song. The Seniors, fourteen of 
them, carrying the daisy chain followed, coming from the front of 
East Rock. 

The regular program was : 

School Song: "In a Grove of Stately Oak Trees." 

Welcome Alice Latham, Class President 

Class Roll Nellie Rose, Class Secretary 

Class Songs. 

Class History Prances Cheatham 

Class Prophecy Eleanor Relyea 

Class Poem Rubie Thorn 

Last Will and Testament Nellie Rose 

Song: "Good-bye, School." 

Dedication of the Annual "Muse" Virginia C. Allen 

Concluding Song: "Alma Mater." 

FLAG RAISING 

Hymn: "Our Fathers' God, to Thee." 

Presentation of the Flag Alice Latham 

"The Star Spangled Banner." 

Prayers and Benediction Rt. Rev. Joseph Blount Cheshire, D.D. 



168 The St. Mary's Muse 

But just as the last of the class songs was being sung the drops 
began pattering down through the trees, and the whole assemblage 
ran for the parlor where the exercises were resumed. To the older 
graduates present the meeting in the parlor, with the Bishops looking 
down from the walls on the groups of white-clad girls scattered on 
cushions and sofa pillows on the floor of the big room, was delightfully 
familiar. 

To the outsider the exercises may have seemed just the usual Class 
Day prophecy, poem, history, and will, but to the girls they meant 
four years of work, of joy and pleasure, and of love and loyalty. 
Frequent hits, appreciated by those on the inside, were greatly en- 
joyed by the girls. 

Miss Virginia C. Allen, Editor-in-Chief of the Muse, in a clever 
speech of dedication, presented to Miss Frances Ranney Bottum a 
copy of the Muse of 19 17. Miss Bottum, the faculty member who 
was honored this year by the dedication of the Muse, expressed her 
appreciation. There were also special copies for Governor and Mrs. 
Bickett, for Bishop Darst, Bishop Cheshire, Miss Emilie McVea, 
Miss Kate McKimmon, the oldest inhabitant of St. Mary's, Mrs. 
Iredell, and Miss Fenner. 

After the song, "Alma Mater," the flag was presented, "Our 
Father's God to Thee" and "The Star Spangled Banner" being sung. 

The unusual feature of this Class Day, and the one that will linger 
longest in the minds of the Seniors and all the students, was the 
presentation in fitting words, by Alice Latham, President of the 
Senior Class, representing the School, and the acceptance by Dr. Lay 
of a beautiful United States flag. After the singing of "Our Father's 
God to Thee" and "The Star Spangled Banner," Bishop Darst in 
touching words blessed the occasion with prayers, and the exercises 
were at an end. 

4:00 p. m : Annual Meeting of tf)e General 
Alumnae Association 

The annual meeting of the general Alumna? Association was held 
in the Parlor on Monday at 4 o'clock with Mrs. A. L. Baker, Acting 
President, presiding. The meeting was a large one though most of 
those present were from Raleigh. Among outside Alumnse were 



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The St. Mary's Muse 169 

Miss Emma Karrer of Spray and Mrs. Watkins Robards of Char- 
lotte, who made the report for the Charlotte Chapter, of which she 
is Chairman. A full report of the meeting is printed in the Alumna? 
section of the Muse. 

The meeting was opened by a prayer by the Rector, the Secretary 
read the minutes, and Mrs. Baker delivered the President's address. 
Dr. Lay then spoke of the School work in general ; the Treasurer 
made her annual report ; and Rev. Mr. Osborne spoke on the progress 
of the work of the Endowment Eund. 

Mrs. T. M. Ashe spoke of Red Cross St. Mary's girls ; Mrs. Mont- 
gomery gave expression of thanks for the Raleigh Chapter to Mrs. 
Bernard for her effective work in the Raleigh endowment campaign ; 
Miss Virginia C. Allen of the Senior Class spoke of the work of the 
students in the Red Cross Eirst Aid classes, and Miss Lizzie Briggs 
made an address of Ail Revoir to Miss Thomas. 

It was decided to apply the small balance in the treasury as far as 
it would go to improving the School Parlor and Hall in Main Build- 
ing. The officers for next year were elected and the meeting ad- 
journed. 

The Art Exhibit 

The Art Exhibit in the Studio is always one of the attractive fea- 
tures of Commencement, and this year was no exception. The exhi- 
bition is open to the public on Monday afternoon and again after 
the concert at night. 

In connection with the exhibit this year and at the same hours 
was held for the first time an exhibition of the work of the Domestic 
Art class of the Department of Home Economics. The display was 
very creditable and reflected much credit on the class and the director 
of the department, Miss Trowbridge. Among other exhibits there 
were articles of underwear by the first-year class, dresses by the 
second-year pupils, and a hat, frame and all, by a second-year pupil. 

The Neivs and Observer said of the exhibit: 

The art exhibit of St. Mary's this year displays some very unusual work, 
especially among the beginners. Course A, Miss Mary Polk, shows promise 
of great talent, her work standing out for boldness and breadth of treatment. 
Miss Battle, Miss White, and Miss Dunn also did very creditable work. The 
original designs in black and white are good, but the most original and inter- 



170 The St. Mary's Muse 

esting designs are those in color, showing in one sheet the pressed plant, 
flower leaves, and root, a water color of it, like nature. Then units of design 
drawn conventionally and applied for wall paper, cretonne, etc. Highly 
original, and showing great variety in the treatment, Miss Ellen Lay's is very 
striking. 

In Course B, Miss White and Miss Susan Linehan and Miss Nancy Lay did 
good work in charcoal work tinted with water colors and some monochrome 
work, beginnings of illustrating. 

The special lists in water colors have some good time sketches to show, and 
the "Autumn Leaves" and "An Interior," by Miss Louise Arbogast, are excel- 
lent. Miss Elizabeth Hughes exhibits a specially good "Corner of the Studio," 
a little interior with good tones, well drawn and well handled. 

The stenciling is attractive, and the casts made from original modeling in 
clay show promise of good things. A child's head by Miss Elizabeth Hughes 
and an Indian head by her are good. Other heads and work by Miss Polk 
and Miss Battle are also worth notice. 

On the whole, the exhibit is a very good one, well worth visiting, and it 
shows the result of the conscientious and thorough training given by Miss 
Clara Fenner, the art teacher. 

8:30 p. m.: The Annual Concert 

The Annual Concert was held on Sautrclay night, May 28, at 8 :30 
o'clock. The stage was most tastefully set off by rambler roses and ] 
a wealth of other beautiful flowers. The pupils, under the efficient 
leadership of the head of the department, Miss Martha A. Dowd, did 
themselves and the School great credit. 

The program was as follows : 

PART ONE 
I 

Witches' Dance MacDowell 

Miss Dorothy Wood 

II 

(a) Berceuse from "Paul et Virginie" Masse 

(&) To a Violet Grieg 

Miss Mary Neal 

III 

Gavotte, E major Bach 

Duetto Mendelssohn 

Miss Katharine Drane 

IV 

Love's Rhapsody Bartlett 

Miss Anita Smith 
Miss Mary Ray, 'cello obligato 



The St. Maey's Muse 171 

V 

Standchen, Op. 33, No. 4 Binding 

The Eagle MacDowell 

Miss Frances Hillman 

VI 

Trio — "Evening" Lucantoni 

Misses Ella Pender, Mildred Kirtland, Rubie Thorn 



PART TWO 

I 

Spring Grieg 

Moment Musicale Schubert 

Violins — Miss Bessie Ray, Miss Helen Snyder, 

Miss Prances Sears, Mr. Robert Jordan 
Violas — Mr. Rice Smith, Mr. Gustav Hagedorn 
'Cellos — Miss Mary Ray, Mr. Wilbur Royster 

II 

Etudes Symphoniques . . . , Schumann 

Finale 

Miss Sarah Rawlings 

III 

Rose Softly Blooming Spohr 

Spring Rapture Harry Gilbert 

Miss Ella Pender 

IV 

When the Roses Bloom Reichardt 

The Star Spangled Banner Key-Arnold 

Semi-Chorus 

Misses Copeland, Hawkins, Hughes A., Hyman, Kirtland, Lay E. B., Marston, 
Moye, McNeill Helen, Neal, Pender, Shuford, Slade, Smith A., Stone A., 
Tarwater, Wiley, Williams V., Wood D., Wright M. 

9:30 p.m.: The Rector's Reception 

The annual reception given by the Rector in honor of the gradu- 
ating class was held in the School Parlor immediately after the con- 
cert. The Commencement visitors, the friends of the School, and the 
old girls were welcomed by Dr. and Mrs. Lay, Miss Thomas, Miss 
Katie, the Bishop and Mrs. Cheshire, and the fourteen members of 



172 The St. Mary's Muse 

the graduating class, who bore their new honors with much dignity. 
Among the out-of-town guests there was an unusually large number 
of the Trustees of the School. 

TUESDAY 

The day began most fittingly by a celebration of the Holy Eucha- 
rist in the Chapel at 8 o'clock, a service dear not only to the girls 
now in attendance at St. Mary's, but especially so to the old girls 
here for Commencement. Following the custom of many years, the 
Rector was the Celebrant, assisted by Rev. Dr. R. B. Drane of the 
Trustees. 

11:00 a. m.: The Corrjroenceroent Day Exercises 
in the Auditorium 

Promptness is one of the features of the life at St. Mary's. Punc- 
tually at 11 o'clock the exercises were bgun by a piano solo : "Scotch 
Poem," MacDowell, played by Mary Lindsay. Seated on the stage 
were the Rector, in academic gown, with his assistant for the occa- 
sion, Miss Katharine Drane, '18; the fourteen graduates; sixteen 
members of the Board of Trustees ; and the Governor of the State, 
Hon. Thomas W. Bickett. After the solo the salutatory, the second 
honor of the class, was read by Eleanor Relyea; then followed the 
reading of the class essay, also by Eleanor Relyea. Next in order 
were two piano solos by Helen Cooper. 

Dr. Lay then introduced in felicitous words the Commencement 
speaker, Hon. Thomas W. Bickett, a synopsis of whose speech from 
the Raleigh Times follows : 

Governor Bickett again demonstrated his inimitable power to break away 
from prevailing custom yesterday when he talked to the girls at St. Mary's 
about a subject, as he said, "of absorbing interest to men because measured 
by inverse proportions to knowledge." Between war and women he chose to 
discuss the latter, and because of his environment, he intimated casually, his 
theme was "The Woman Beautiful." 

His address was delivered at the graduating exercises of the School, which 
were concluded yesterday with the presentation of the College diplomas in 
the Chapel following the announcement of honors, the presentation of certifi- 
cates and distinctions, and the individual program numbers. 



The St. Mary's Muse 173 

The elusiveness and perpetual charm of a woman's beauty he discussed, and 
then told of the three things necessary to attain what he characterized as 
a natural right. "An ugly woman is a mistake and at law with the purpose 
of her being, for it was the original plan that she be beautiful. 

"While this cosmical quality is her first estate and her natural right," he 
said, "chivalry shrinks from but candor forces the confession that some have 
missed this normal inheritance. 

"Ugliness is a preventable disease, in the same category with typhoid fever, 
smallpox, and tuberculosis. Once we get it branded as such we will have gone 
far towards its annihilation. Be beautiful! You must be, and if you can't 
be entirely so, wage a campaign to be as much so as you can be." 

And turning to the class, he added, "It seems to me you have made a 
reasonable effort." 

"A woman's beauty is her crown of glory when found in righteousness," 
he said. "It is the master key that opens every door. Men like flattery, even 
if women don't, and a smile, a ribbon, and a rose go far to kill the germ of 
indifference and despair that carries many women to a lawyer's office." 

How It May Be Acquired 

There are three principles to be observed in acquiring this beauty: 
Strength, naturalness, and holiness. 

To be beautiful it is necessary to be strong, and the beginning of beauty is 
a good digestion, Governor Bickett explained. "You owe it to yourself and 
to the brethren to be an authority on the subject of cooking, for at this point 
you are vitally your brother's keeper." 

Beauty and dyspepsia are not affinities, and the cook does the best work in 
the creation of "the belle of the ball." A sensible diet should be the primary 
course in every school for girls, because poached eggs and turnip salad are 
better than all the eighty-cent candy on the market. One apple contains 
more sparkle than the entire fifty-seven varieties, and buttermilk has it all 
over the soda founts as a complexion producer. The gymnasium, outdoor 
games, and walking he urged as important factors along with ten o'clock 
retiring. 

The second requisite for beauty Governor Bickett advanced is naturalness. 
"Be genuine, open-minded, wholesome, and sincere," he urged. "Inaccuracy 
lives next door to dishonesty, and slovenliness is a sister to immorality." 
"Affectation spoils more faces than smallpox." 

In this age of shams, when so many things are plastered, veneered, and 
powdered over, when the "eens" are in the saddle, the Governor feared there 
was danger of the girls becoming "girleens." 

"In the matter of dress," said the Governor, "to thine own self be true, 
and it will follow as the night the day, thou canst not be false to any man." 

He wanted to see the day, he said, when the women, freed from their 
slavery to the united dressmakers, would refuse to hop because some son of 
royalty goes lame. 

Finally, to enter into the full kingdom of a woman beautiful, it is neces- 
sary, he said, to be holy, and holiness he distinguished from sanctimony. 



174 The St. Mary's Muse 

"The great world needs holiness and must have it or perish from moral 
malaria. Man cannot supply it; it is woman's privilege to meet it." 

The woman, illumined by the beauty of holiness, the Governor pictured 
as the saviour of the home. 

After the address Anita Smith rendered very effectively two "Folk 
Songs." Eva Peele then delivered the Valedictory, and the exercises 
in the Auditorium were brought to a close after the announcement 
by the Rector of the Honors, and the presentation of the Diplomas, 
the Certificates, and the distinctions. 

Dr. Lay took occasion to refer with appreciative words and with 
keen regret to the changes in the Faculty for next year : Miss Eleanor 
Thomas, Lady Principal; Miss Helen Urquhart, head of the Latin 
Department; and Miss Lillian Fenner, housekeeper; who will not 
return to St. Mary's. 

Corjcludiog Exercises ir> tfye Crjapel 

After the conclusion of the exercises in the Auditorium the audi- 
ence was invited to go to the Chapel, and this procession is one of the 
distinctive features of Commencement. 

The girls, all in white, inarch two by two to the Chapel door where 
they divide ranks facing one another, and through the ranks, headed 
by the Chief Marshal, and each body by its own marshal, march in 
order, the Choir, the Trustees, the Seniors and Certificate pupils, and 
the Faculty. The girls then march in and are seated in the transepts. 
The service is brief and simple. 

The Diplomas were presented to the graduates by Bishop Cheshire, 
who then called on Bishop Darst to say some parting words, words 
pregnant with meaning and helpfulness. The girls marched out to 
the old familiar recessional, sung by so many St. Mary's girls on so 
many Commencements, "Jerusalem, High Tower," and formed a line 
in front of Main Building facing south, standing at attention until 
the long procession of the Clergy and Trustees had passed by. 



The St. Mary's Muse 175 



THE 75th COMMENCEMENT HONORS AND AWARDS 
THE GRADUATES 

The College Class of 1917 

Virginia Caroline Allen Raleigh, N. C. 

Virginia Pope Allen Goldsboro, N. C. 

Emma Hudgins Badham Edenton, N. C. 

Frances Howe Cheatham Henderson, N. C. 

Jeanet Fairley Rockingham, N. C. 

Georgia Foster Savannah, Ga. 

Elmyra Jenkins Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

Golda Foy Judd Raleigh, N. C. 

Alice Cohn Latham Plymouth, N. C. 

Eva Irene Peele (First Honor) Williamston, N. C. 

Eleanor Relyea (Second Honor) Washington, D. C. 

Annie Huske Robinson Hawkinsville, Ga. 

Nellie Cooper Rose Henderson, N. C. 

Rubie Logan Thorn Kingstree, S. C. 

AWARDS IN THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

Diplomas in Piano and Voice 

Martha Boardman Wright Boardman, N. C. 

Certificates in Piano 

Katharine Parker Drane Edenton, N. C. 

Sarah Littlejohn Rawlings Wilson, N. C. 

THE ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 

Certificate 
Aline Edmonds Hughes Henderson, N. C. 

THE HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 

Certificate 
Eliza Braswell Knight Tarboro, N. C. 

THE BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Full Certificates 

Jeannette Ball Raleigh, N. C. 

Mamie C. Hicks Raleigh, N. C. 

Certificates in Stenography and Typewriting 

Nancy P. Woolf ord Suffolk, Va. 

Helen Snyder Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Certificates in Typewriting 

Marion Smith Raleigh, N. C. 

Elsie Snipes Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Sarah Wiley Southern Pines, N. C. 

Josie Wright Wilmington, N. C. 



176 The St. Mary's Muse 



The Honor F^oll 

The highest general award of merit, open to all members 
of the School, is the Honor Roll, announced at Commence- 
ment. The requirements are: 

(1) The student must have been in attendance the entire 
session and have been absent from no duty at any time 
during the session without the full consent of the Rector, 
and without lawful excuse. 

(2) She must have had during the year a full regular 
course of study or its equivalent, and must have carried this 
work to successful completion, taking all required examina- 
tions and obtaining a mark for the year in each subject of 
at least 75 per cent. 

(3) She must have maintained an average of "Very Good" 
(90 per cent) or better in her studies. 

(4) She must have made a record of "Excellent" (less 
than two demerits) in Deportment, in Industry, and in 
Punctuality. 

(5) She must have maintained a generally satisfactory 
bearing in the affairs of her school life during the year. 

THE HONOR ROLL, 1916-17 

Elizabeth McMorine Folk, '18 95.1 

Eva Irene Peele, '17 93.6 

Henrietta Marshall Morgan, '18 93.5 

Katharine Parker Drane, '18 93.3 

Eleanor Wood Relyea, '17 92.7 

Marion Travis Edwards, '18 92.6 

Mary Bertrand Wilson, '22 92.6 

Elizabeth Whitley Baker, '22 92.2 

Muriel Dougherty, '22 91.6 

Katharine Critchton Alston, '21 91.8 

Mary Ely Lindsay, '20 91.4 

Agnes Theresa Pratt, '18 91.2 

Marian Drane, '20 91.0 

Aline Edmonds Hughes, '18 90.8 

Annie Huske Robinson, '17 90.3 

THE BISHOP PARKER BOTANY PRIZE 

The Bishoj) Parker Botany Prize, given by the Rt. Rev. 
Edward M. Parker, Bishop Coadjutor of New Hampshire, is 
awarded annually to that student who, in accordance with 
certain published conditions, does the best work in the prepa- 
ration of an herbarium. 

The Botany Prize was this year awarded to Miss Maude 
Miller, '18, of Raleigh. 



The St. Mary's Muse 177 

THE NILES MEDAL 

The Niles Medal for General Excellence was instituted by 
Rev. Charles Martin Niles, D.D., in 1906. It is awarded to 
the student who has made the best record in scholarship and 
deportment during the session. 

The medal is awarded to the same student only once. 

The requirements for eligibility are: 

(1) The student must have taken throughout the year at 
least "15 points" of regular work; and have satisfactorily 
completed this work, passing all required examinations. 

(2) She must have been "Excellent" in Deportment. 

(3) She must have taken all regular general courses as- 
signed and have done satisfactory work in them. 

(4) She must be a regular student of the College Depart- 
ment. 

The Niles Medal was this year awarded to Miss Elizabeth 
McMorine Folk, of Raleigh, of the Junior Class, whose aver- 
age was 95.1. 

CLASS PROMOTIONS FOR 1917-18 IN THE COLLEGE 

To ee Conditioned Freshmen. 

Susan Eugenia Linehan. 
Virginia Page Royster. 

To be Freshmen. 

Katharine Crichton Alston. 
Rainsford Fairbanks Glass. 
Mary McBee Hoke. 
Anna Rogers Lay. 

To be Sophomores. 

Helen Van Wyck Battle. 
Katherine Galloway Batts. 
Marie Elizabeth Bowne. 
Helen Sinclair Brigham. 
Helen Clifford Cooper. 
Katharine Pretlow Darden. 
Sara Lorton Davis. 
Marian Drane. 
Mildred Olive Ferebee. 
Marjorie Stewart Griffith. 
Mary Clark Guirkin. 



178 The St. Mary's Muse 

Mildred Lord Jones. 
Mildred Elizabeth Kirtland. 
Eliza Braswell Knight. 
Mary Ely Lindsay. 
Gertrude Glaister Merrimon. 
Mary Louise Nixon. 
Ella Banning Pender. 
Mary Tasker Polk. 
Minerva Virginia Pottle. 
Alice Creswell Seed. 
Susan Evans Smith. 
Audrey Stone. 
Judith Eleanor Sublett. 
Elizabeth Nash Waddell. 
Gladys Mial Williamson. 
Mary Callett Wilson. 
Dorothy Portlock Wood. 

To be Juniors. 

Bertha Sears Albertson. 
Florence Cooper Busbee. 
Mildred Collins. 
Ellen Booth Lay. 
Josephine Macon Myers. 
Sarah Littlejohn Rawlings. 
Alma Louise Spencer. 

To be Seniors. 

Katharine Parker Drane. 
Marion Travis Edwards. 
Elizabeth McMorine Folk. 
Ruth Ward Gebert. 
Aline Edmonds Hughes. 
Katharine Dorothy Hughes. 
Helen Laughinghouse. 
Helen Carhart Mason. 
Maude Irene Miller. 
Henrietta Marshall Morgan. 
Novella Higgs Moye. 
Agnes Theresa Pratt. 
Estelle Strozier Ravenel. 



The St. Mary's Muse 179 

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT 

To be Promoted to Intermediate Department. 

Dorothy Louise Howard 
Mary Elizabeth Yates 

To be Commended 
For Progress in the Studies of the Department : 
Rebecca Bowen 
Eugenia Travers Riddick 

For Perfect Attendance: 

Susie May Robbins 

For Deportment : 

Nancy Belvin Harden 
Martha Bailey Hawkins Andrews 
Julia Johnson Andrews 
Rebecca Bowen 

Honor Roll 

Mary Elizabeth Yates 92,0 

Julia Johnson Andrews 90.5 

Katharine Baird Raney 90.5 

INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT 

Special Mention: 

Elizabeth Lewis Lawrence has not been absent or tardy 
during the year. 

Honor Roll 

Mary Strange Morgan 94.3 

Sylbert Pendleton 93.8 

Virginia Harrison Lay 93.6 

Margaret Denson Raney 92.5 

Elizabeth Lewis Lawrence 92.4 



180 The St. Mary's Muse 



THE COLLEGE HONORS OF 1917 



Trje Salutatory 

Eleanor Relyea. 

Some of the homely words are to its those that have most pleasing 
sound, and among them is the word welcome. It is, then, a pleasant 
privilege that is mine today, to say welcome to yon in behalf of the 
class of 1917 to these the closing exercises of our Commencement. 
We are happy to have with us our good friend, Bishop Cheshire, 
Bishop Darst, whose words to us on Sunday will often urge us on, the 
Trustees, our Rector, and the Faculty, the School and our friends. 
To each and all we give hearty welcome. 

In this year of 1917 it is, perhaps, not unfitting that we turn to 
some thoughts on the meaning of the life and the work of Rupert 
Brooke. 

Tbe Class Essay: "Rupert BrooKe" 
Eleanor Relyea. 

In all its hideous cruelty and misery, as it devastates and destroys 
to make waste places of some of the fairest fields and cities of the 
earth, we have watched the war from day to day with horror and 
wonder and a puzzled soul putting the apparently futile question, 
"What is it all for V As we read of desperate conflicts in the trenches 
in which thousands are killed, and of attacks on ships at sea, of the 
sinking of a submarine or the winging of an aeroplane, we are struck 
dumb with impotent rage at the seeming futility of so much waste 
and misery. All the compounding influences of the last generation 
that have been tending to bring us into a wider and ever widening 
contact with other people and with other places have made plain to 
us our kinship with the world, and have brought home to us a more 
personal realization of the meaning of "the brotherhood of man." 
The world has been growing pacific and to our modern ideals this 
most brutal and most blaring war in history crashing down unmerci- 
fully, seems so useless, so unnecessary. As it sweeps over land and 
sea, trailing ruin and suffering in its wake, marring the beauties of 
nature, demolishing the results of man's labor, it takes above all the 



The St. Mary's Muse 181 



young manhood of the earth, strong in its youth to dare and do. The 
young are the strength of the world today and the promise of greater 
strength in the future, yet the young are the food of war. The 
tragedy of it makes one shudder. Why, why, why should it be ? 
That so much beauty and the power to create and control should be 
swept aside and destroyed in the very period of its blooming is almost 
incomprehensible. Youth itself must sacrifice so much — its love of 
living, and "the last, the best, of life for which the first was made," 
and the world too loses a priceless treasure. What is it for ? Why 
should it be ? Youth itself has given the answer. A great genius 
has drawn the attention of thousands to one who was young and 
powerful and full of promise, who loved life in its fullness with an 
extreme intensity, who, when brought face to face with the issue, 
found and gave forth a triumphant answer; and to thousands who 
may know but vaguely of a brief and fortunate life, a brilliant per- 
sonality, a poetic genius and a final supreme sacrifice, this spirit 
typifies the youth of the world paying its tribute to the undiscriminat- 
ing god of destruction. 

Rupert Brooke is immortal now with Sir Philip Sydney, and with 
Keats and Shelley, for he was, perhaps, the most gifted of the writers 
to whom the war has given glory and death. Before the German 
troops crossed Belgian soil his whimsical, sometimes romantic, some- 
times cynical verses were known to many lovers of poetry, and his 
work has become increasingly popular since his own experiences at 
the front called forth from him the five sonnets, "incomparably the 
finest poetic utterance concerning the great war." All of his poetry 
is penetrated with a deep arresting passion for life that resulted, no 
doubt, from the fact that his twenty-seven years of life were unusu- 
ally happy in disposition and event. He was born in 1887 at Rugby 
where his father was an assistant master. As a boy there he played 
cricket and football for his school and wrote a prize poem called 
"The Bastile." He took a great interest in every form of athletic 
sport, became a sound tennis player, and was insatiably fond of 
swimming, particularly by night. In 1906 he went up to King's 
College, Cambridge, where he was considered one of the leading in- 
tellectual men, and where he made innumerable friends. He was 



182 The St. Mary's Muse 

one of the handsomest Englishmen of his day and a brilliant con- 
versationalist. He made friends, admirers, adorers wherever he 
went, for he had "wit, the cleanest kind of chivalry, inflexible sin- 
cerity, and the dear courtesy that only a sincere man knows, and his 
moods seemed to be merely a disguise for the radiance of an early 
summer's day." He was, his friends say, "vivid," exuberant and 
adventurous in spirit, with a passionate delight in real existence with 
which he saturated all his work. 

All his poetry is full of that spirit, and his letters from America 
are delightfully indicative of his wide-awake interest in all his sur- 
roundings. The observations are keen and amusing yet there is also 
a certain amount of sympathy and a feeling of fellowship with the 
people and a degree of admiration for America and Americans that 
are interesting and pleasing in that they reveal the vitality and 
breadth of his character. 

In his earlier poems the impression that he had no conviction of 
any real survival lent a certain poignancy to the enjoyment of all 
that he loved in this life, for he constantly referred with repugnance 
to death as if it were the end of things beautiful and lovely. He loved 
life and he thought reluctantly of leaving it : 

"But the best I've known 
Stays here and changes, breaks, grows old, is blown 
About the winds of the world, and fades from brains 
Of living men, and dies. 

Nothing remains." 

It is not that he hates or fears death so much, though, as it is that 

he does love life; indeed, no one ever cared for it more wholly or 

more minutely. He calls himself the "Great Lover," and enumerates 

his loves : 

"White plates and cups, clean-gleaming, 
Ringed with blue lines, and feathery, furry dust; 
Wet roofs, beneath the lamplight * * * 
Then the cool kindliness of sheets, that soon 
Smooth away trouble; * * * the keen 
Unpassioned beauty of a great machine; 
The benison of hot water; pure to touch; 
and other such" * * * 



The St. Mary's Muse 183 

Numbers of things he mentions that he loves, and presents them in 
such a way that we feel with him and love his loves too. More than 
the things themselves, though, are present in his heart as he writes. 
"Dear names," he calls them. Names, symbols, dear for their own 
individual value; delightful for the sound of their syllables as well 
as for the preciseness of meaning. This love for words gave him a 
powerful diction, and his adherence to detail developed in him a 
remarkable power of description. In style and selection of words 
he had already become perfected. He might have grown in breadth 
and in significance, but already, at his age and with his experience, 
he had reached that finished power in choice of words that Tennyson 
only after long years of apprenticeship was able to attain. Brooke 
also was a master hand in the theatrical impersonation of abstrac- 
tions ; he had an unerring eye for color and effect — for staging, and 
he knew and cultivated the virtue of a brief dramatic ending. George 
Woodberry says that "judged by the most orthodox standards Rupert 
Brooke has been found conspicuously successful in his art in three 
formal ways : in the dramatic sonnet, in the narrative idyl, and in 
the 'melange,' that is, the method of indiscrimination by which he 
gathers up experience and pours it out again in language with full 
disregard of its relative values." It is in the latter success that he is 
typical not only of England but of his generation. His tendency to 
combine the concrete and the abstract, to fuse together the real and 
the ideal, more than anything else identifies him with modern poetry 
which attempts to bring specific mundane instances in immediate 
contact with the expression of ideas and ideals. An unfailing sense 
of fitness and of what is becoming and appropriate saves him here 
as elsewhere from any error in absolute good taste. In this he never 
forced his note, just as he was never sentimental in the inferior 
sense of the word, and just as his humor always rang true. His taste 
is unimpeachable. The inspired idyl, "Grantchester," illustrates 
well his vitality and vivacity along with his presentation of actuali- 
ties on a background of thought and idealism. It shows, too, his 
absorbing love for home : 

"For England's the one land, I know, 
Where men with splendid Hearts may go." 



184 The St. Maey's Muse 

He knew and appreciated Germany and the Germans ; moreover, 
was, indeed, extremely fond of them, and admired particularly the 
German government of Samoa, but sitting in the hot Berlin cafe, 
sheer homesickness evoked the contrast : 

"Here tulips bloom as they are told; 
Unkempt above those hedges blows 
An English unofficial rose; 
And there the unregulated sun 
Slopes down to rest when day is done, 
And wakes a vague unpunctual star" * * * 
'And das Betreten's not verboten" * * * 

In the light of subsequent events a rather telling criticism and one 
that the world is learning to appreciate more and more every day! 
This same deep reverence for England found articulation again in 
the great war sonnets which give youth's answer to our perplexed 
question or rebellious protest against the need of this war. Brooke 
was himself of a cosmopolitan and decidedly pacific call of mind and, 
moreover, he had many delightful memories of friends in Germany. 
At the outbreak of war he too was perplexed. One of his own articles 
analyzes admirably the bewilderment that he felt. A destructive 
aspect of Germany conflicted so with his former ideas of her, and the 
idea of war itself was distasteful. He "realized with increasing 
resentment that music would be neglected. And he wouldn't be able, 
for example, to camp out. He might have to volunteer for military 
training and service. Some of his friends would be killed. The 
Russian ballet would not return. Absurd but inevitable." He was 
more irritated and outdone than anything else at the changes that 
war would bring, but as he sat and thought the full tide of "England'' 
broke over him and his attitude changed, advancing triumphantly 
from doubt and perplexity to full vision and understanding. His 
heart sang England, England — always England. The song took him 
to Belgium to aid in the defense of Antwerp, and led him many times 
through battle in the face of death. 



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The St. Mary's Muse 185 

After the strange night retreat along roads lit by the flames of 
burning Belgian towers and cities he spent the winter of 1914 in 
training at Blandford Camp in Dorsetshire. In February he sailed 
with the British Mediterranean expeditionary force, but he never 
reached the Dardanelles. He went first to Lemnos and then to Egypt. 
Early in April he had a touch of sunstroke from which he recovered, 
but he died from blood-poisoning on board a French hospital ship at 
Scyros on Friday April 23. There, among the wheat fields and the 
olive groves of the South, about a mile inland from the lapping blue 
waters of the Mediterranean, is his grave and over it a plain little 
wooden cross marked in black with his name and date. 

His chant for England did not desert him in death itself. His 
love for life became a willingness to die — for England. JSTot once 
does he waver nor does he ever fear to remind himself of all that he 
is losing. He recounts gladly the joys he has had: "Dawn— and 
Sunset, and the colors of earth — had seen movement and heard music ; 
known slumber and waking; had gone proudly friended" ; and calmly 
recalls the things he must give up, things sacrificed by so many youth- 
ful comrades there already dead who 

"Laid the world away; poured out the red 
Sweet wine of youth; gave up the years to be 
Of work and joy, and that unhoped serene, 
That men call age; and those who would have been, 
Their sons, they gave, their immortality." 

What is the use of it ? What is it all for ? Right squarely does he 
meet the issue and he faces the future unafraid. The answer is 
triumphant : 

"Now, God be thanked who has watched us with His hour, 
And caught our youth, and wakened us from sleeping." 

"Honor has come back, as a king, to earth, 

And paid his subjects with a royal wage; 
And nobleness walks in our ways again; 
And we have come into our heritage." 



186 The St. Mart's Muse 

Valedictory 

Eva Ibene Peele. 

At last the day has come to which we have for these four years 
looked forward — half with longing, half with dread. At first we 
longed for the time to come, but today we realize as never before the 
real, true meaning of our graduation, and deep down in our hearts 
there is a feeling that we should like to live over the happy years we 
have spent at St. Mary's, that we should like to begin our school life 
again. But, saddened as we must be by the thoughts of this separa- 
tion, we are glad to feel that the teachings and ideals that St. Mary's 
has given us will guide our steps and lead us on through life. At 
no time in the history of the world could there be a greater need for 
our service, a greater demand on our usefulness than there is today. 
Whether we go out from St. Mary's as prospective teachers, college 
girls, or girls that are to remain at home, it matters not — there is 
some task that we can perform, some place in life that we can fill, if 
we but try. And as this is but a commencement day in our lives of 
usefulness, let us enter upon it aright, let us begin this new day with 
a fresh and firm determination to do our part in whatsoever course 
of life we take. It is hard for us to bid farewell to friends we have 
loved so long, to teachers who have been so kind to us, and to our dear 
and beloved Lady Principal, and to our kind and interested Rector, 
and we want them each to feel that we are really and truly grateful 
to them, and that we do appreciate their every effort in our behalf. 
On this our seventy-fifth Annual Commencement, when we must 
needs be impressed by the "enduring freshness" and "iivingness" of 
St. Mary's, we think it meet to give personal mention to its "oldest 
inhabitant," Miss Katie, and we hope and pray that we may ever 
prove as faithful, loyal, and true to St. Mary's as she has. So it is 
with this feeling of mingled joy and sorrow, with this feeling of love, 
gratitude, and appreciation that we bid farewell to you each and 
every one, and to St. Mary's — our Alma Mater — the dearest and 
best of schools. 



The St. Mary's Muse 187 



CLASS DAY EXERCISES 



THE CLASS POEM 

The bonds are firm and enduring 

Which bind our hearts in one, 
Ties of affection and friendship, 

Of interest, work, and fun. 
And living with face toward the future 

We've worked with heart and with soul 
Till we've come to our graduation, 

Most eagerly sought-for goal. 

So now at our happy Commencement 

We're full of thanks and of zeal, 
For we have with us the teachings 

Which St. Mary's has joy to reveal. 
May her precepts and ideals stay with us, 

Keep us ever faithful and true; 
May they make our lives each of service, 

Our hearts with firm strength endue. 

Farewell, then, dear Alma Mater; 

Our days now with you are past, 
But time's passing will never sever 

Our devotion and love steadfast. 
And though we are sad at parting, 

Ours a quiet joy is, too, 
Since memory will make ever dearer 

The love that we bear to you. 

Rubie Thorn. 

THE HISTORY OF THE CLASS OF 1917 

A group of Freshmen, jolly and care-free, had their first class 
meeting in the fall of 1913. It was a large group, sixty-four in num- 
ber, and the meeting was for the purpose of organizing a class which 
should go forth from St. Mary's as graduates in May, 1917. After 
as wise a transaction of business and as little squabbling as could be 
expected on the part of three-score girls the assemblage adjourned, a 
well organized class, having as its adviser Miss Thomas ; its Presi- 
dent, Agnes Barton ; its motto, "Aim High, but Reach Higher" ; 
colors, lavender and purple; flower, violet. With such competent 
ones at the head, our class felt sure of success. In the first year, a 



188 The St. Mary's Muse 

perfect one from a Freshman's standpoint, we had all of the experi- 
ences expected of so large a class: Some kept Miss Thomas busy 
reading out reports while others from the start worked hard pre- 
paring themselves for the honors which must fall to some on gradu- 
ation day. 

We felt very proud when we received invitations to a party to be 
given by the Juniors (think of it, the Juniors) to the Freshmen. In 
turn we entertained them in the spring. By then we really felt at 
ease with these "superior ones," and even with the Seniors and Senior 
Hall had become one of the main meeting places for the Freshmen. 
The proceedings of the year ended with the School party and Com- 
mencement. 

When we returned to St. Mary's in September, 1914, our arrival 
was something like that at home. We no longer felt that we were 
foreign beings out of our element but that we belonged at St. Mary's 
and that she was as glad to have us back as we were to be here. Out 
of our class of the year before only six had returned as Sophomores 
for some had passed us by and gone into the Junior class while others 
had remained at home. The smallness of our number rather in- 
creased our class spirit, and with Alice Latham as President we 
started another year, feeling as wise as the wisest of Sophomores. 
We knew that there were a number of Freshmen who were going to 
work hard and join us later, so we had prospects for a flourishing 
Junior year. The hospitality extended us in the fall by the Seniors 
we returned after Christmas by giving them a Japanese party, and 
we thought our chrysanthemum decorations and quaint Oriental cos- 
tumes of hostess and guest made this one of the prettiest of class 
parties. Our class does not boast of humility as a cardinal virtue. 

And the Junior year did not increase our humble mindedness, for 
were there not Junior privileges to wear with nonchalant self-confi- 
dence ? For example, when Fair Week came it meant more to us 
than ever before, for. according to custom, Miss Sutton chaperoned 
us downtown one night during that week and what a gay time we 
had and how many yarns to spin the next morning. This was the 
first experience of our class of going downtown at night together 



The St. Mary's Muse 189 

without the whole school, and we adored it. That year we enter- 
tained the Freshmen at a Quaker party, the first of its kind ever 
given at St. Mary's. Miss Thomas and Alice tried to give us a proper 
pride in their originality. Time moved swiftly on before Christ- 
mas. At our return after the holidays class meetings began in full. 
A call meeting at the lunch period, another meeting at nine-thirty, 
and so on, all in preparation for the Junior-Senior banquet which 
really came to pass in April. It was the "Mad Tea Party, Revised," 
a revision which showed Mr. Cruikshank's ingenuity in adaptation 
and inexhaustible resourcefulness more than had any previous in- 
stance of it. And how we did enjoy carrying it oft' ! It was not 
much later that we did observance once more for the Seniors when 
at the end of May we toiled in the hot sun picking daisies, then got 
up before day the next morning and made the daisy chain. We did 
not mind the work because we knew that it was the last thing that 
we would do for our good friends whose mantles were to fall upon 
our shoulders the next day. 

Back again, and Seniors ! This was hard to realize when we 
arrived last fall ; neither did we wish to realize it, for this meant the 
last year for us at St. Mary's. What could have been worse ? All 
of our ambition to graduate left us and we wanted to be among the 
Freshmen who stood in line waiting to matriculate, thinking, judg- 
ing from the expressions on their faces, that it was some dread 
ordeal. Alice has been a wonder and all of the squabbles and 
wrangles at class meetings seem mere trifles now, and we would like 
to go over every minute of the time again. We congratulate our- 
selves and our President for the successful entertainments given 
during the year, for all say they have surpassed those of former years. 
As the class of 1916 will always be remembered by others on account 
of the Shakespearean Festival and by us because they obtained the 
new Senior privileges which we have so enjoyed, so do we hope that 
we will be remembered as the class of 1917, the seventy-fifth Anni- 
versary of the School. We do hope that we will be remembered not 
as the dread collectors of Muse dues, but as the class associated with 
the festival days, honoring our Alma Mater, venerable for long and 



190 The St. Mary's Muse 

respected life and so endeared to each one of lis that here today the 
thought uppermost in our minds is that we may in deeds done and 
in loyal devotion be worthy of our title of graduates of St. Mary's. 

Frances Cheatham. 

THE WILL AND TESTAMENT OF THE CLASS OF 1917 

We, the Senior Class of St. Mary's School, of this City of Raleigh, 
of this County of Wake, of this State of North Carolina, being of 
supposedly sound mind, memory, and understanding, do hereby 
make, publish, and declare the following as and for our last will and 
testament : 

First. I, Virginia Caroline Allen, being in a generous frame of 
mind, do devise and bequeath this book, entitled "How to be 
Dignified," to Agnes Pratt, knowing full well her lack of dig- 
nity. 

Second. I, Elmyra Jenkins, in a most violent and turbulent man- 
ner, do bequeath and give to Henrietta Morgan my loud and 
boisterous voice on the one stipulation that it be used in the hall 
during evening study hour. 

Third. I, Eleanor Wood Relyea, do give and devise to Marion Ed- 
wards, who on several examinations has made only 99, this 
"Outlook," hoping that she will bear in mind that knowledge 
is gained only by hard study. 

Fourth. I, Alice Cohn Latham, do hereby will to Katharine Drane 
my wonderful public dignity and executive ability that she may 
be qualified to lead the Senior Class next year. 

Fifth. I, Eva Irene Peel, with great grief and sorrow, do devise 
and bequeath to Helen Laughinghouse, who during this year 
has proven such an early riser, my bell, that she may at early 
dawn arouse the Seniors, in order to get them to breakfast 
by 7:15. 

Sixth. The musical instruments, I, Annie Robinson, do give and 
bequeath to Estelle Ravenel, that she may not only play the 
piano for dancing but charm Senior Hall with their tunes. 



The St. Mary's Muse 191 

Seventh. I, Frances Howe Cheatham, do will to Bessie Folk my 
cheerful and care-free countenance that she may enjoy the duties 
of a Senior and at least seem not to give way under the weight 
of them. 

Eighth. I, Rubie Logan Thorn, do give and devise to Aline Hughes 
my vocal accomplishments on the one condition that she will 
have pity on her fellow classmates and not torment them with 
her melodious voice. 

Ninth. I, Georgia Foster, do bequeath to Novella Moye a family 
album and string of beaus to serve as an everlasting topic of 
conversation for her. 

Tenth. I, Emma Hudgins Badham, do devise and bequeath to 
Maude Miller all my offices and memberships in the various stu- 
dent organizations here, as such things heretofore seem to have 
had a mysterious fascination for her. 

Eleventh. I, Jeanet Fairley, do devise and bequeath to Helen 
Mason, the undignified, my stately and queenly bearing. 

Twelfth. We, Virginia Pope Allen and Nellie Cooper Rose, do 
give and bequeath to Ruth Gebert and Estelle Ravenel our in- 
genuity and originality for devising a means of entertainment 
for evening study hour (scene laid in the library). 

Thirteenth. We, the Senior Class, do bequeath to the School an 
electric attachment for the Chapel organ or an organola to be 
used as an assistant for Mr. Owen in case he wishes to sleep 
during Dr. Lay's services. 

Fourteenth. We, the Senior Class, do bequeath the Faculty our 
undying love and appreciation for all their efforts in our behalf, 
and especially to Miss Thomas, our beloved Class Adviser. 

Fifteenth. We, the Senior Class, do devise and bequeath to the 
Preps our colors, purple and lavender, to be worn by them until 
the good year 1921. 

Sixteenth. We, the Senior Class, do give and devise to Miss Lizzie 
Lee deepest and sincerest affections and with the hope that she 
may have many happy years of life in Senior Hall. 
Signed, sealed, published, and declared by the testator, the Senior 

Class, at its request and for its last will and testament in the presence 



192 The St. Mart's Muse 



of each other, having hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses, 
this 28th day of May, 1917. 

Witnesses : 

Alice Latham. 

Miss Eleanor W. Thomas. 

Codicil : I, Nellie Cooper Rose, being in my sane and proper mind, 
do hereby bequeath my mastery of all situations and ability to 
get out of difficulty and to pull others out, to Marjorie Griffith. 

The Annual Meeting of the Trustees 

The final event of the Commencement season takes place after the 
actual close of the session for the annual meeting of the Trustees is 
held at the School on the afternoon of Commencement Day. 

The 1917 meeting was especially well attended and it is under- 
stood that the meeting was a very satisfactory one. iSTo report of any 
business transacted was made public. 

The Trustees on hand for the meeting were : 

Bishop Cheshire, the President; Dr. K. P. Battle, Jr., the Secretary; Col. 
Chas. E. Johnson, Dr. R. H. Lewis, Rev. J. E. Ingle, Rev. M. A. Barber, Mr. 
Graham H. Andrews, all of Raleigh; Rev. I. W. Hughes and Mr. D. Y. Cooper 
of Henderson; Mr. W. A. Erwin of Durham — for the Diocese of North Caro- 
lina. 

Bishop Darst of Wilmington; Rev. R. B. Drane of Edenton; Rev. J. H. 
Griffith of Kinston; Mr. George C. Royall of Goldshoro and Mr. Frank Wood 
of Edenton — for the Diocese of East Carolina. 

Rev. T. T. Walsh of New York; Rev. Louis G. Wood, formerly of Charles- 
ton, now of New York; and Mr. Thos. W. Bacot of Charleston — for the 
Diocese of South Carolina. 

Judge W. A. Hoke of Lincolnton and Raleigh, and Rev. H. N. Bowne of 
Tryon — for the District of Asheville. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ebnbst Cruikshank, Alumna: Editor 

St. Mary's Alumnse Association. 
Honorary President - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

Honorary Vice-Presidents - / Mrs - L McK - pittin ger, Raleigh. 

I Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 
President - Mrs. W. E. Lindsay, Spartanburg, S. C. 

Vice-President - Mrs. A. L. Baker, Raleigh. 

Secretary - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



The Annual Meeting of the Alumnae Association 

The regular Commencement meeting of the Alumnae Association 
was held in the Parlor on the afternoon of May 28th. The meeting- 
was a large one and considerable interest was shown. 

The meeting was opened with prayer by the Rector, after which 
he spoke of the general condition of the School and the relation of the 
Alumnae Association to it. He referred to the appeal of several of 
the Chapters for a woman member of the Board of Trustees and said 
that the Diocesan Conventions would have to change their laws in 
order to elect a woman. He said this might be done but that the 
Alumnse body as it now stands is not sufficiently organized to go about 
accomplishing such a change. He urged that the Alumna?, if they 
were in earnest in the matter, should undertake a better organization 
of the Association. 

Rev. Francis M. Osborne, Special Representative of the Trustees, 
spoke of the progress of the work for the Campaign Fund and of the 
valuable work that the Alumnae could do and were doing in the cam- 
paign. 

Miss Virginia C. Allen of the Graduating Class spoke of the work 
of the students in the Red Cross section, and Mrs. Watkins Robards 
of Charlotte reported for that Chapter. 

Other speeches are given below in full. 



194 The St. Mary's Muse 

The full program was : 

Call to Order Mrs. Ashby L. Baker, Acting President 

Address of Welcome to the Graduating Class and to the Visiting 

Alumnae Mrs. Margaret Busbee Shipp 

Roll Call— For Visiting and New Members. 

Reading of the Minutes Miss Kate McKimmon, Secretary 

President's Address Mrs. A. L. Baker (Minnie Tucker) 

Address Rev. George W. Lay, Rector 

Report of the Council. 

Treasurer's Report Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank 

Report of the Raleigh Chapter Mrs. T. M. Ashe (Nannie Jones) 

"Red Cross St. Mary's Girls" Mrs. Ashe 

"The Endowment Campaign" Rev. P. M. Osborne 

"Thanks to Mrs. Bernard" Mrs. W. A. Montgomery 

News of Other Chapters Mrs. George Snow 

"Au Revoir to Miss Thomas" Miss Lizzie Briggs 

Unfinished Business. 
Election of Officers. 
Adjournment. 

After a discussion as to whether the small balance in the treasury 
should be used for traveling expenses for the President or some other 
of the officers in making a tour of the Chapters with a view to 
strengthening them, or should be used as the nucleus for a "loan 
fund," it was decided, on motion of Mrs. Root, to apply such sums 
as were available toward a remodeling and renovation of the Parlor 
and Hall of Main Building. 

The officers for 1917-18 are: 

ALUMNAE COUNCIL 

President, Mrs. J. S. Holmes, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Vice-President, Mrs. Alice D. Grimes, Raleigh, N. C. 
Secretary, Miss Kate McKimmon (reelected). 
Treasurer, Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank (reelected). 

MEMBERS OF COUNCIL 

Miss Minnie Leary, Elizabeth City 



Miss Emilie W. McVea, Sweetbrier 

Mrs. J. J. Bernard, Raleigh 

Miss F. W. Slater, New York " 

*Mrs. A. L. Baker, Raleigh ) ^ 1920 

*Miss Gertrude Royster, Raleigh t 

*To succeed Mis. George Snow and Miss Susan Iden, whose terms have expired. 



The St. Mary's Muse 195 

PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS— MRS. A. L. BAKER 

I feel that I owe the Association more of an apology than an ad- 
dress for my limited stewardship. But for the officers of the Asso- 
ciation as a whole I will say that any special work was rather taken 
out of our hands by the Trustees in inaugurating the campaign for 
the Endowment Fund, save, of course, for our cooperation, so that 
no other undertaking was feasible for us this year. 

I do wish just here to refresh your minds upon the purpose of the 
Alumna? Association of St. Mary's School, Raleigh, which is the 
strengthening and perpetuating of the ties of school life among St. 
Mary's girls, and the furtherance of the interests of St. Mary's School 
and her Alumnae. This can be far-reaching, as Miss Cheshire sweetly 
said in her remarks at the Alumnae luncheon, "That we could almost 
boast that the sun never sets on St. Mary's girls. Truly they have 
proven for the most part to be proud possessions." 

I should also like, first as a reprimand to myself, for I know I 
have not done my duty, to add my plea to that of Mr. Barber, which 
some of us heard on Sunday, that as church people and Alumnae of 
St. Mary's we make next year an especial effort to attend more fre- 
quently the various affairs given at the School. 

Few people really appreciate the inspiration their presence lends 
as a unit of the sum total of an "inspiring audience." The girls up 
here I am sure would feel and appreciate our enthusiasm. 

I cannot imagine that when they have rehearsed daily for recitals, 
and almost every one on the place must know their selections as well 
as themselves, that there can be left much verve and inspiration to 
perform the same selection before the same listening audience gath- 
red together under the auditorium roof. There is a band of "faith- 
ful few" who have done their duty in the passing years, and I honor 
them. Let this be our slogan, "Up to St. Mary's, Upward for St. 
Mary's." This I consider the most important work we can do for 
St. Mary's next year. Teachers as well as pupils would appreciate 
our attendance — as enthusiasm inspires greater effort and better 
work. 

I cannot bring my remarks to a close, dear Alumna?, without a 
word, in which I feel so sure of your endorsement, of grateful thanks 



196 The St. Maey's Muse 

to Dr. Lay, Miss Thomas, and the pupils of St. Mary's for the de- 
lightful pageant and royal entertainment of their guests on the occa- 
sion of the 75th Anniversary. By the youngest present I am sure it 
will be pleasantly remembered for the next 75 years. I ask you to 
join me in a rising vote of thanks. 

THE ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TREASURER, MAY 28, 1917 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance in bank May 31, 1916 $1,691.07 

Dues paid direct to Treasurer 17.00 

Dues paid through Chapters: 

Raleigh ($200 through Mrs. Baker) 209.00 

Charlotte 10.00 

New York 11.00 

Asheville 10.50 

Special to Scholarship Fund: 

Raleigh Chapter 31.75 

Miss E. W. Thomas 1.00 

From St. Mary's Muse, $36 gift, $64 loan 100.00 

Interest accrued on bank deposit 30.74 

Interest accrued on bonds 300.00 

Total $2,412.06 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Interest on bonds, paid to beneficiaries $ 240.00 

Returned to Muse 64.00 

To purchase bonds 2,053.67 

Balance in bank at this date 54.39 

$2,412.06 

TOTAL RESOURCES. 

$3,000.00 in 6 per cent St. Mary's bonds, interest payable March and Sep- 
tember. 
2,000.00 in 6 per cent Raleigh Building and Trust Company bonds, interest 
payable May and November. 
54.39 in bank. 

$5,054.59 Respectfully submitted, 

Margaret Cruikshank, 

Treasurer. 



The St. Mary's Muse 197 

REPORT OF THE RALEIGH CHAPTER— MRS. T. M. ASHE 

The regular Founders' Day meeting of the Raleigh Chapter of 
i the Alumnae was held in the School Parlor in November. A small 
amount of business was transacted, after which, through the courtesy 
of several members of the Faculty, those who were so fortunate as 
to be present enjoyed a social hour together. Miss Glen gave a charm- 
ing talk on her life abroad, Miss Thompson sang, and Miss Shields 
played for us. A cup of tea was served. 

Between the time of the May meeting and the November meeting 
$240.75 was turned into the general treasury. 

We had several called meetings of the Chapter last fall in connec- 
tion with Mr. Osborne's canvass for the School Endowment Fund. 
Several members of the Chapter gave personal assistance in the can- 
vass itself. And with Mrs. Bernard as chairman we furnished and 
served midday lunches for several days to the various committees 
who reported at that time. 

It was our great pleasure to participate in the celebration of the 
75th Anniversary of St. Mary's, which took place on the 12th of 
May. We were present in large numbers and enjoyed the luncheon, 
the pageant, and other features prepared for this occasion by the 
School. The regular spring meeting of the Chapter was held last 
Thursday, May 24th, in the School Parlor with Miss Sallie Dortch, 
the Chairman, presiding. The Treasurer gave an encouraging re- 
port. During the year more than $200 has been turned into the 
treasury of the General Alumnae Association by the Raleigh Chapter. 

Officers for the ensuing year were elected as follows : Miss Susan 
Iden, Chairman; Mrs. W. H. Pace, Vice-Chairman ; Mrs. J. B. 
Cheshire, Jr., Secretary, and Miss Lizzie Lee, Treasurer. Miss 
Elizabeth Briggs, Miss Florence Jones, and Miss Sarah Cheshire 
were the nominating committee. Mrs. Nannie Ashe was elected dele- 
gate to represent the Raleigh Chapter at the General Alumnae 
Meeting. 

EXPRESSION OF THANKS TO MRS. BERNARD— MRS. MONTGOMERY 

Following Mrs. Ashe, Mrs. Montgomery spoke of the splendid 
work done by Mrs. J. J. Bernard in serving luncheons during "cam- 
paign week" in Raleigh for the Endowment Fund. 



198 The St. Mary's Muse 

Mrs. Montgomery said: 

"A good many of you now present were with us last October, when 
Mr. Osborne called us together to consult over launching the canvass 
to secure in Raleigh the endowment fund for St. Mary's School. He 
assured us that it was quite the custom to give a luncheon each day 
of the week to the canvassers that they might meet to consult over 
the results of their work during the morning and afternoon before. I 
think the Alumnae went into it very half-heartedly, feeling that it 
was a bad policy to take any from the sum that we proposed to add 
to the two scholarships we were so anxious to complete. But each 
person present contributed to a fund with which to buy the necessary 
articles for the five luncheons, and also asked others not present to 
assist until we had gotten the sum of $80. Then, in the wisdom of 
ladies assembled, the services of an Alumna were secured to draft a 
menu for each day and purchase necessary food to carry it out in a 
most beautiful and attractive way. She figured on having fifty 
present at lunch, and managed so skillfully and practically, as well as 
tactfully, that four elegant luncheons were given at the cost of $55, or 
$13.60 each. She afterwards handed over to the Treasurer the re- 
mainder of the sum, $25. The Alumnae were much praised by the 
gentlemen for the delightful food and the enjoyable occasions while 
the ladies felt under lasting obligations to the one of their number 
who had bought so well. That lady was Mrs. J. J. Bernard." 

AU REVOIR TO MISS THOMAS— MISS BRIGGS 

Miss Elizabeth Briggs, speaking for the Alumnae, said "Au Re- 
voir" to Miss Thomas, who will not return next year. Miss Briggs 
said : 

"There is an old and oft quoted saying 'that the most precious 
articles are done up in the smallest packages.' Raleigh, and espe- 
cially that part of Raleigh connected with St. Mary's School, is fully 
persuaded of the truth of this old adage. Have we not had full proof 
of it in the person of one who for seventeen years has been connected 
with this School ? One hundred and four carats is large indeed for a 
diamond but small for the measure of a woman. Yet the Kohinoor 
itself shines not so brilliantly as the record of this small woman. 



The St. Mary's Muse 199 

Nor is the worth of the world's greatest gem sufficient to show the 
value of her who has given so freely, so graciously, and so unselfishly 
of her mind and heart to the girls under her care. 

"Those of us who were present at the 75th Anniversary Luncheon 
recall the resounding applause that followed the beautiful toast of- 
fered by Miss Thomas. Many of us also heard the whispered words 
of ardent love that came from girlish lips. 'The sweetest person in 
the world'— 'Isn't she precious!' — 'I adore her,' and many similar 
things came to my ears. And these from girls Miss Thomas had 
taught, and maybe had even punished. But so wisely, so justly, so 
sweetly had she used her power that love had blossomed like roses 
under the hands of one skilled in training and even in pruning. 

"It is no small thing, Miss Thomas, for you to have won and to 
have held the love of hundreds of girls you have taught during these 
seventeen years. We realize that your duties have been many and 
your responsibilities enough to overpower a soul less brave. We 
know, too, that we have not always been as careful as we might have 
been of the great treasure in our midst. We have left you to uses 
of tiresome rounds of work and have made heavy demands upon your 
time and strength. ISTow that you find it necessary to leave us for a 
little rest, we bring this tardy expression of appreciation of all you 
have done. Please do not think that among our old sayings we could 
now quote the one that 'Blessings brighten as they take their flight.' 
You have been a blessing to St. Mary's, and the brightness you have 
shed shines in hearts near and far. We have felt the blessing and 
seen the brightness, but are only now saying to you what we have 
long thought. 

"Praise from us is poor indeed in the face of the success that stands 
out with such evidence from your efforts. May the time of your 
absence from us be full of refreshment for you in mind and body 
But whatever stretch of days and miles separates us we want you 
to know that the love of your girls and the appreciation of all who 
hold dear the traditions of St. Mary's will be with you. Your work 
cannot be measured by time, neither can time destroy it. 

"We ask that to the blessings you have already given us you add 
yet another blessing, that of a speedy return." 



200 The St. Mary's Muse 



PRE-COMMENCEMENT NEWS 



May 19: The Annual Recital of the Chorus 

Just as the "School Party" seems to bring us to the close of the 
School year, so the Annual Chorus Concert seems to usher in the 
Commencement, season. Its regular date is the Saturday before the 
Commencement Play. 

Mr. Owen had good material this year and the Concert was very 
pleasing. To quote from the News and Observer: 

The concert given last evening by the Chorus Class and voice pupils of 
St. Mary's was one of the most enjoyable events in the School calendar for the 
year 1916-17. The curtain rose on a softly lighted stage filled with row upon 
row of young girls in white, while graceful sprays of crimson roses framed 
the beautiful picture. 

The program opened with an (a) and (b) number by the chorus — "Boat 
Song," Ware-Spross, sung with good tone and rhythm with delicate shading, 
the very pretty and descriptive accompaniment adding to the effect; and 
"Lindy," by Gilbert Spross, evidently a favorite with the singers, who put 
much spirit into their interpretation of this quaint song. 

Miss Mary Neal showed musical taste and gave promise of considerable 
dramatic ability in her presentation of "Si le bonheur," from "Faust," and 
"To a Violet" by Grieg. 

Miss Gladys Williamson, lyric soprano pupil of Miss Marion Thompson, 
sang Gounod's "Sing, Smile, Slumber" with flexibility and pure quality of 
tone. Miss Williamson was accompanied by Miss Seymour at the piano and 
Mr. Robert Jordan, violin obligato. 

Trio, "Evening," by Lucantoni, old Italian in style, was sung with smooth 
tone and good blending of voices by Misses Ella Pender, Mildred Kirtland, 
and Rubie Thorn. 

Miss Audrey Stone, dramatic soprano, gave a spirited and effective render- 
ing of Burleigh's War Song, "One Year, 1914-1915." 

Part One of the program closed with "Love's Rhapsody" by Bartlett, sung 
by Miss Anita Smith, a lyric soprano rich and resonant, with 'cello obligato 
by Miss Mary Ray. Both Mr. Jordan and Miss Ray, who so ably and musically 
assisted the songs with obligates, are pupils of Mr. Gustav Hagedorn. 

Part Two of the program was Vincent d' Indy's "St. Mary Magdalene," a 
composition of the modern French school, and one of the most beautiful 
choruses written for women's voices. The solos were sung with good style 
and expression by Misses Ella Pender, Anita Smith, and Hilah Tarwater, 
while Miss Roberts as accompanist was reinforced by Miss Dowd at the 
second piano. The chorus did splendid work. The voices, fresh, clear, and 
unforced, were well balanced and well trained. Especially beautiful was the 
legato sustained tone of the "Weep thou no more but hope, Magdalene" 



The St. Mary's Muse 201 

and the splendid climax at the end, "Your sin shall be forgiven for you have 
loved me well," which they reached with full sonorous quality of tone, with- 
out strain. 

At the close of the program, at a tap of the conductor's baton, chorus and 
audience stood and united in a resounding rendering of the "Star Spangled 
Banner." 

PROGRAMME 

PART I 

I. (a) Boat Song Ware-Spross 

( 6 ) Lindy Gilbert Spross 

Chorus. 

[I. (a) "Si le bonheur" (from "Faust") Gounod 

( 6 ) To a Violet Grieg 

Miss Mary Neal. 

III. Serenade Gounod 

Miss Gladys Williamson. 

Mr. Robert Jordan, violin obligato. 

Miss Seymour at the piano. 

1 IV. Trio : "Evening" Lucantoni 

Misses Ella Pender, Mildred Kirtland, Rubie Thorn. 

V. One Year, 1914-1915 Burleigh 

Miss Audrey Stone. 

VI. Love's Rhapsody Bartlett 

Miss Anita Smith. 

Miss Mary Ray, 'cello obligato. 

PART II 

f St. Mary Magdalene Vincent d'Indy 

Soloists: Misses Ella Pender, Anita Smith, and Hilah Tarwateb. 
Accompanists: Miss Martha Roberts, first piano. 

Miss Martha A. Dowd, second piano. 



Read! Mark! Act! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and th 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a goo 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it paj 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize th£ 
it is their loss, not ours. 



DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 

206-10 MASONIC TEMPLE 



Success in the Campaign for the Raising of the $250,000 
Fund to pay off the debt and provide additional new build- 
ings, and the beginning of an Endowment Fund is of the 
utmost importance to St. Mary's. 

Think of it, talk of it, and help in every way you can. 



B. W. JONES 

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Phones 667-668 528 Hillsboro Street 



'You get them when promised" 



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THE WAKE DRUG STORE 

Phones 228 



HICKS' UPTOWN DRUG STORE 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 



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Base Balls, Basket Balls 
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tleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

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Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 

Phone 529 

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ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 

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All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies. 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 



Subscriptions for the monthly Muse are very acceptable 
at all times. One dollar will bring the ten copies of the 
Muse published next after its receipt. 



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Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 

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Advertisements 



Stationery, College Linen, Pennants, 
Cameras and Supplies 
Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

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THE FOOTERY SHOP 

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THE ALUMNAE ARE REMINDED 
that a complete Alumnce Register, which should include 
information about all past students of St. Mary's, is 
now in course of preparation for publication. 

Information for this Register is solicited. 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

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A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 

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RALEIGH, N. C. 

HELLER'S SHOE" STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 



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A Cafe which invites the patronage o 
ladies. The girls of St. Mary's -will enjo: 
the beauty and convenience of our modern 
■well-appointed dining- place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 



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Raleigh, N. C. 

THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 

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Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements 



St. Mary's Girls Always Welcome at 

Hudson-Belk Company 

Full line of Ready-to-wear, Hosiery, Gloves, Furnishings, Dry 
Goods, Shoes, Toilet Goods, Ribbons and Laces 



ESTABLISHED 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

M. ROSENTHAL & COMPANY 

GROCERS 

Wilmington and Hargett Streets 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 
AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Cor. Fayetteville and Hargett Sts. 



THOMAS A PARTIN COMPANY 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Specialty of Ladies' Ready-to- Wear Gar' 
merits and Gossard's Lace Front Corsets 



THE SCHOOL AUTHORITIES 

are at all times pleased to send full information 
about St. Mary's on request without charge. 
We should like every one interested to have at 
least copies of 

The Illustrated Catalogue, 

The Books of Views, 

The Song Book. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



BOYLAN-PEARCE 

COMPANY 

The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

76th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBEK 18, 1917 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGAN JANUARY 25, 1917. 



1. THE COLLEGE 

2. THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
St. Mary's \ s TRE ART DEPARTMENT 

offers 
instruction { h- THE ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 

in these J 5< TRE HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 
1 6. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL 
7. THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



In 1916-17 are enrolled 275 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 
Thirty-six Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 
Dormitories. 
Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 
slight to the Scholastic training. 
For catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, D. C. L., 

Rector. 

IDWARDI • BROUGHTON PRINTING CO.. RALIIOH. N. C. 



L '-• 



Wnt 

&atetg&, &. C. 



"Natation J&unrtier 
auausa, 1917 



The St. Mary's Muse 



VACATION NUMBER 



Vol. XXI August, 1917 No. 10 






CONTENTS 



t>AGE 

The New Lady Principal, Miss Lucy Hester 204 

Twenty-five Thousand Backing the Fund 205 

The St. Mary's Girls Mobilize for Work 207 

The New York Alumna? Chapter Urges a Woman Trustee 209 

A Letter from Miss Glen 210 

Mrs. Madelon Battle Hancock Receives the Order of Merit 211 

The Summer at St. Mary's 212 

With the Faculty 213 

With the Class of 1917 214 

St. Mary's in the Summer Schools 215 

Mrs. Margaret Busbee Shipp, Author 217 

Death of Mrs. Randolph. 219 

Notes of St. Mary's People 219 

St. Mary's College Graduates 220 

The Endowed Scholarships 222 

Changes Among the Raleigh Clergy 222 

Brief Notes of the Girls 223 

Alumnae Weddings 224 

Editorial . . . 227 



The next number of The Muse will be the Opening Number, which will be 
issued the middle of September. 



204 The St. Mary's Muse 



The New Lady Principal 



Dr. George W. Lay, the Rector of St. Mary's School, announced 
in June the appointment as Lady Principal of St. Mary's for the 
next session of Miss Lucy Graham Hester, who will succeed Miss 
Eleanor W. Thomas. 

The appointment should prove a popular one, as Miss Hester is a 
graduate of St. Mary's who has had long and successful experience 
both as teacher and Lady Principal in many well known schools, and 
her family has been closely connected with the State for several gen- 
erations. 

Miss Hester was graduated from St. Mary's in 1890. She has been 
at Bishop Hopkins' Hall, Burlington, Vermont, at St. Mary's Hall, 
Faribault, Minn., and at Stuart Hall, Staunton, Va. She was Prin- 
cipal at St. Margaret's Hall, Boise, Idaho, from 1904 to 1912, and 
has been for the past three years Principal of Pembroke Hall at 
Hampton, Va. Miss Hester's mother was Lucy Hamlet, of an old 
Charlotte County, Virginia, family; her grandmother was Lucy 
Ruffin Chambers, daughter of General Moses Chambers, of Person 
County; and her great grandmother was Lucie Davie, a connection 
of General William R. Davie, who was Governor of the State in 
1799 and known as the father of the University. 

The Hesters are an old Granville County family, and Miss Hester 
is a sister of the Rev. St. Clair Hester, Rector of the Church of the 
Messiah, Brooklyn, who graduated from Chapel Hill in 1888; was 
assistant professor of English there under Dr. Hume for several 
years, and was honored by the State University with the degree of 
D.D. in 1908. He is Chaplain of the North Carolina Society of 
New York City. 

Miss Hester is studying this summer at the Columbia University 
Summer School. 



The St. Mary's Muse 205 



The St. Mary's Furjd 



The following leaflet has been issued lately by Mr. Osborne : 

TWENTY-FIVE THOUSAND BACKING THE FUND. 

Representatively through their annual diocesan conventions, held in May 
and June, 1917, the twenty-five thousand communicants of the Episcopal 
Church in North and South Carolina have endorsed the plan of the Trustees 
of St. Mary's School to raise a $250,000 fund for the improvement and endow- 
ment of this institution. Further than this, these four conventions have 
appointed strong committees to cooperate with the Trustees in planning and 
organizing the canvass in the several dioceses. The Special Representative 
of the Trustees is now getting in touch with these committees, and very 
shortly concerted action and definite results will be reported. 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

The Diocese of South Carolina was the first of the Carolina dioceses to hold 
its annual council in May. The meeting was held at Cheraw. Bishop Guerry 
cordially invited the Representative of the Trustees to speak of the fund, and 
gave him a good place on the program. The gathering of clergy and delegates 
evinced a sincere interest in the subject, passed a resolution of endorsement, 
and appointed a committee to cooperate with the Trustees in planning the 
canvass in South Carolina. 

A canvass will be made in South Carolina in the fall by the friends and 
alumni of Porter's Military Academy at Charleston, S. C. When that is over, 
St. Mary's will claim the right of way. 

NORTH CAROLINA 

The convention of the Diocese of North Carolina and Bishop Cheshire reiter- 
ated the claims of St. Mary's School in strongest terms, and a forceful com- 
mittee was appointed to cooperate with the Trustees in the Diocese of North 
Carolina and with like committees from the other dioceses. 

The organization of the canvass in this Diocese has already been begun by 
the appointment of parochial committees in nearly all the leading congrega- 
tions. In actual results this Diocese is now leading and is organized to go 
forward as rapidly as these committees agree that local conditions permit. 

EAST CAROLINA 

Three times during the Council of East Carolina the subject of the fund 
was presented. Bishop Darst spoke of it in his address. The Special Repre- 
sentative of the Trustees was given an excellent opportunity on the program, 



206 The St. Mary's Muse 

and in a Round Table Conference at the close of the Council, Mr. George C. 
Royall, a Trustee and member of Executive Committee of the Board and an 
active member of the Special Committee of the Board appointed in connec- 
tion with the canvass for the fund, again referred to the subject. A com- 
mittee to cooperate with the Trustees was appointed by the Council. Bishop 
Darst has thrown himself heartily into the cause, and with the cooperation 
of this committee and the Trustees will lead the movement in his Diocese. 
East Carolina has a fine diocesan spirit and has never failed to come up to 
expectations when this spirit has been aroused. 

ASHEVILLE 

In the work of the District of Asheville, Bishop Horner considers educa- 
tional work of great importance. So he gave the Special Representative of 
the Trustees an important place on his program, and the place of St. Mary's 
School as a missionary agency and as an important element in the Church's 
educational system was stressed. The strength of the committee of men and 
women appointed by the convention as well as the resolution of approval is 
an indication of substantial cooperation from the mountain district. 

WHO ARE THE TRUSTEES? 

A more representative body of men from all walks of life cannot be found 
in the Carolinas than the Trustees of the St. Mary's School. They are the 
men responsible for this movement. They are leading this movement per- 
sonally, and by their contributions and the 25,000 Episcopalians who elected 
them will be ready to follow, for they are men to be trusted in directing the 
affairs of our great School. Their very names should inspire confidence: 

North Carolina — The Rt. Rev. Joseph Blount Cheshire, D.D., Raleigh; Rev. 
M. A. Barber, Raleigh; Rev. Julian E. Ingle, Raleigh; Mr. Wm. A. Erwin, 
Durham; Mr. D. Y. Cooper, Henderson; Mr. Graham H. Andrews, Raleigh; 
Rev. Isaac W. Hughes, Henderson. 

East Carolina — The Rt. Rev. Thos. C. Darst, D.D., Wilmington; Rev. Robt. 
B. Drane, Edenton; Rev. John H. Griffith, Kinston; Mr. Geo. C. Royall, Golds- 
boro; Mr. Frank Wood, Edenton. 

Asheville— The Rt. Rev. Junius M. Horner, D.D., Asheville; Rev. H. Nor- 
wood Bowne, Tryon; Hon. Wm. A. Hoke, Raleigh; Mr. Frank A. Clinard, Ashe- 
ville; Rev. Fredk. D. Lobdell, Rutherfordton. 

South Carolina— The Rt. Rev. Wm. A. Guerry, D.D., Charleston; Rev. T. T. 
Walsh, York; Mr. P. T. Hayne, Greenville; Mr. T. W. Bacot, Charleston; 
Rev. L. G. Wood, Church's Mission House, 281 Fourth Ave., New York City. 

THE EFFECT OF THE WAR 

Far from the war having the effect of causing a cessation of effort to raise 
the fund the conditions created by the war make the necessity for the fund 
more urgent. In face of the extra demands of the times the Secretary of 
War, in speaking to a national assembly of the representatives of American 



The St. Mary's Muse 207 

schools and colleges, said that it is our patriotic duty to allow nothing to 
dislocate the normal processes of our common life. The fund is a necessity 
and not a luxury, and so we shall vigorously press its claim. 

Respectfully, Francis M. Osborne, 

Special Representative of the Trustees of St. Mary's School. 
Raleigh, N. C, July 10, 1917. 

Enclosed in the leaflet is an attractive blotter which says : 

On account of the high cost of paper, you are asked to use both sides of this 
blotter — one to blot your page and the other to remind you that with a little 
personal economy the 25,000 communicants of the Episcopal Church in North 
and South Carolina can easily save $250,000 for the St. Mary's School Fund. 



Tf)e St. Mary's Girls Mobilize for Worl^ 



Most of St. Mary's was enlisted the past spring in some form of 
Red Cross work. Eighty members of the School took the First Aid 
Course. 

Following this work came the call in May for a mobilization for the 
vacation while we are separated. 

At the suggestion of the Rector, and with his help, a committee 
of the girls drafted the following pledge, which was printed. Copies 
were signed in duplicate by a large part of the girls who are now 
doubtless busy in living up to their pledges : 

ST. MARY'S SCHOOL 
Raleigh, N. C. 

May, 1917. 
Mobilizing During Vacation for the War 

(1) Economy. — To save a dollar's worth adds a dollar to our country's 
wealth. Economy and waste prevention depend largely on women. 

(2) From the Home Base to the Front. — If A takes B's task, B is released to 
take C's task, etc., until the work of those at home makes it possible to put 
a man at the front. 

(3) Woman's Part. — This is most important, and consists in practicing 
economy and preventing waste, and also in doing some useful work at home 
which will ultimately release a man to do the more difficult work. 

(4) A Sober Mind. — Do the ordinary thing, but do it better. Do not get 
excited. The best authorities say: "The present crisis calls for no hysteria; 



208 The St. Mary's Muse 

money must not cease circulating; the regular channels of business must be 
kept open and patronized; we must be calm and collected." 

"A program for national thought involves high and low, the rich and the 
poor, the strong and the weak. It must be universal and cooperative, embrac- 
ing every man, woman, and child in the United States." 



Each St. Mary's student is expected deliberately, in certain definite ways, 
to do her part. 
Fill out this blank. Underscore whatever applies to you. 

My Preparation: 

I belong to the Red Cross. 

I have taken a Certificate in First Aid. 

I belong to a Canning Club. 

I can sew, knit, crochet, cook, help in the house, help in the garden. 

My Promise. — I promise, as far as possible: 

To be economical in dress, ice cream, soft drinks, toilet articles; to take 
only enough at meals and leave nothing on my plate; to mend my clothes 
and wear old clothes when possible to save good ones; to have old shoes 
mended instead of buying new ones; to choose the simple and inexpensive 
in buying clothes; to consider expense to tradesmen by ordering things 
delivered as seldom as possible, and by carrying my own parcels; to pay 
cash; to be on time, especially for meals; to keep myself and others well so 
as to be more efficient and not waste time. 

To attend to my own room; to help in house-cleaning, housekeeping, cook- 
ing; to plant a garden and work it; to can, dry, or preserve fruits and 
vegetables. 

To join the Red Cross; to take First Aid; to help to organize a Red Cross 
branch; to work for the Red Cross; to knit or sew for the soldiers, Red 
Cross or hospital supplies; to help in entertainments for relief work; to take 
an interest in measures for local betterment; to interest others in woman's 
part for the war; to prepare myself for further usefulness, such as hospital 
nursing. 

To cheer up those at the front by sending reading matter, useful articles, 
etc.; to be cheerful myself, so that all about may be more cheerful. 
To 

Signed 

Home Address 

(Date) 



The St. Mary's Muse 209 



The New YorK Alumnae Chapter Urges a Woman Trustee 



In furtherance of the movement in the Alumnse for provision for 
a woman member of the Board of Trustees of St. Mary's, the New 
York Chapter in May issued a circular letter to the other Alumnse 
Chapters. 

Embodied in the letter is an endorsement of the ideals of St. 
Mary's and the work of the Rector in his early vision of the need of 
new and modern buildings, in the good scholarship he has maintained, 
in his insistence upon standards of responsibility, discipline, courtesy, 
and honor, and in the direct and healthful influence of his training 
in personal responsibility. 

The letter says : 

We of the New York Chapter of St. Mary's Alumnae send greetings to our 
many sister Chapters on this, the seventy-fifth Anniversary of the founding 
of our Alma Mater. Our hearts and our minds turn with reverence and 
gratitude to the beloved founder and to his son and successor. The founding 
of a school for girls, a school of the highest standards, and involving financial 
and other sacrifices of the Smedes family, was a great piece of pioneering 
work in education. And because of it, women from every Southern State are 
in debt to St. Mary's and its founders. Shall we not repay that debt to the 
School by giving the present Rector not only such constructive suggestions 
as lie within the province of an alumnae body, but also our whole-hearted 
support? 

We of this Chapter live in New York where there are many well-known 
schools unhampered by the financial difficulties which must be met and over- 
come by St. Mary's. To these schools some of us send our daughters, and in 
them some of us teach. Tuition alone is as much or more than the cost of a 
year's board and tuition at St. Mary's. This fact makes us realize how much 
St. Mary's needs an endowment to meet modern requirements, but it also 
makes us admire the quality of the work that is being done there under diffi- 
cult limitations. The following things, under the present Rector's manage- 
ment, call for ungrudging admiration: 

(1) The vision that foresaw the necessity for new and modern buildings 
and equipment. These, while but a small part of what the Rector feels are 
requisite, are the necessary nucleus. 

(2) Good scholarship. We look with respect and admiration at the quality 
of the work done, often in classes far beyond the ideal size. Here is seen the 
trained schoolmaster's technical knowledge and ability. 

(3) Insistence upon standards of responsibility, discipline, courtesy, and 



210 The St. Mary's Muse 



honor, such as we like to think have always been characteristic of the daugh- 
ters of the School. 

(4) A direct and healthful influence, a training in personal responsibility 
that make for the initiative and resourcefulness so needed in modern life. 

We of this Alumnse group are making what we think a constructive sug- 
gestion, and we ask the hearty support of all the Alumnse Chapters. The 
suggestion is that there be a woman trustee, a trustee who is a graduate of 
St. Mary's and elected by the organized Alumnse. Many graduates are directly 
in touch with every phase of modern education for women. We think it would 
be of great value to the School that such a woman have a voice in the manage- 
ment, and also that the large body of Alumnae have a direct representative 
on the Board of Trustees. A trained woman's viewpoint cannot fail to be of 
service where the education of women is in question. Many splendid schools 
are managed entirely by women, and coeducational universities have one or 
more women on their governing bodies. Will you give our suggestion your 
support? 

With renewed greetings and affectionate good wishes, we are, 

Margaret Young Weisse, President. 
Mary Snow Baskerville, Secretary. 
For the New York Chapter of St. Mary's Alumrue. 



A Letter from Miss Glen 



523 East 77th Street, New York, May, 1917. 
Dear Girls of St. Mary's : 

The time has come for you to go home, and I shall never see you 
all together again. You will, however, know how often I have thought 
of you when flags are waving, bands playing, and people cheering. 
How I should like to talk to you again for one half-hour about the 
war! It is such a little while since I used to tell you that the day 
was coming soon when we would go to war while you listened as if it 
were fairy talk. It was the day JofTre landed at the Battery that I 
wished for you most. There I was standing for hours in a pouring 
rain in my blue army cape that you all know, and my very worst old 
hat. We munched sandwiches to while away the time, and we offered 
to share them with a squad of police, but the importance of the occa- 
sion forbade such liberty. They returned our courtesy, however, by 
pushing back the crowd and by keeping the entire cavalry escort from 
prancing on our toes. It is needless to say we were just as near the 



The St. Mary's Muse 211 

spot as possible where General Joffre would have to pass. I never 
was happier in my life than when I saw the flag of the United States 
united at last with the flags of the allies. General Joffre looked very 
sad at first, but later he smiled sometimes and looked more like his 
pictures. All of our school came in town for the occasion, and I said 
at the time, "Now if I only had the St. Mary's girls." 

I have heard about all the interesting things you are doing for the 
soldiers. Do all you can, and then do more. 

Thank you so much for the letters and cards you have sent me. 
With love always, Janet B. Glen. 



Mrs. Madelon Battle Hancock Receives trje "Order of Merit" 



St. Mary's girls who know Miss Glen, and especially those of 
1915-16, will remember Miss Glen's account of the experiences of 
"Madelon Battle" (S. M. S., 1895), daughter of Dr. Westray Bat- 
tle of Asheville, and wife of Lieutenant Mortimer Hancock of the 
British Army, who since the early days of the war has been in 
Europe in the Red Cross work. 

They, as well as Mrs. Hancock's older friends, are much interested 
in the following notice of a further recognition of her heroic service. 

The notice is from the Charlotte Observer: 

Mrs. Louis M. Bourne, of Asheville, received from King Albert, of Belgium, 
on April 4, notification that her kinswoman, Mrs. Mortimer Hancock, has 
received from the King "order of distinguished merit" for her heroic work 
for the sick and wounded soldiers. 

Mrs. Hancock, known among the soldiers as "Sister Glory Hancock," is of 
Asheville. When the war began she volunteered her services as a Red Cross 
nurse, and most of the time during the course of the war she has been always 
in sound of the guns and often under fire. The royal proclamation follows. 
The translation from the French was made by Miss Wakefield, of the Asheville 
High School. 

Albert, King of Belgium. 

To the Generations of the Present and Future, Salutation: 

In consideration of the royal decree of July 1, 1867, creating an order of 
distinguished merit for recompensing brilliant acts of courage and devotion 
to humanity ; in consideration of the decree of the 18th of May, 1915, relative 



212 The St. Mary's Muse 

to the granting of the insignia of this order for 1914-15, we, at the suggestion 
of the Belgian Government, have and do decree that this cross, 1914-15, be 
accorded to "Sister Glory Hancock," who for two years with complete disre- 
gard of peril has devoted herself to the care of the sick and wounded 
soldiers. 

To the Minister of the Interior is intrusted the execution of this decree. 

(Signed) Albebt. 



Tf}e Summer at St. Mary's 



The summer at St. Mary's has been very much as usual, with a 
great deal of quiet and a great deal to do. The results of the summer 
work are of course always observed in the fall. 

Dr. Lay spent June in the North where he went primarily to attend 
to the vacancies in the Faculty, but also had the pleasure of being 
present at the Finals at St. Paul's School, Concord, New Hampshire, 
where he was Master for nineteen years, and later of attending his 
class reunion at Yale where the Class celebrated its thirty-fifth anni- 
versary. He returned to St. Mary's the first of July, but with Mrs. 
Lay spent the latter half of July at Virginia Beach. Mrs. Lay's 
sister, Miss Balch, who is always a most welcome guest at the School, 
stayed on this summer until August, and was with the children 
during Dr. and Mrs. Lay's absence. The younger Lays have been 
for the most part at home. Elizabeth and Ellen have attended the 

A. and E. Summer School and Elizabeth has been taking the Red 
Cross First Aid course. Nancy did excellent work in arranging, 
with the help of others, for a Carnival in the front of the Grove the 
last of July for the Syrian and Armenian Fund, and though the 
date unfortunately conflicted with the week of rain, much to the dis- 
appointment of those interested, the entertainment when held, July 
23, was very successful. Mrs. Lay is busy with her duties as Presi- 
dent of the Woman's Club, which is a very engrossing duty. George 

B. Lay is spending this summer, as last, at the Government Experi- 
ment Station at Fairport, Iowa. 

Mr. Stone traveled for the School during June and July, visiting 
many points in the Carolinas and seeing many girls. While he was 
away Mrs. Stone and Florence were at their home, and in August 
they all go to a family gathering near Danville, Va. 



The St. Maky's Muse 213 

Miss Sutton, Miss Lee, and Mr. Cruikshank have been at the 
School most of the summer. Miss Lee has been in charge of the 
garden conservation with good results. Mr. Cruikshank expects to 
make a trip for the School to the western part of the State in August. 
Mrs. Cruikshank and the children were in Oxford for a visit in June, 
and have since been at St. Mary's. Mrs. Cruikshank's sister, Miss 
Mary Pride Jones, is spending the latter part of the summer with her. 



With the Faculty 



There will be fewer changes in the Faculty the coming session 
than for a number of years, though the going of Miss Thomas will 
be very much felt. As stated elsewhere, Miss Lucy Graham Hester 
will succeed Miss Thomas,. and Miss Agnes H. Barton (S. M. S., '15), 
graduate of the University of North Carolina at the last Commence- 
ment, will succeed Miss Julia Allen. Miss Lillian Fenner's suc- 
cessor as Housekeeper has not yet been chosen, but all the other 
teachers and officers will return. 

Miss Thomas is spending the summer at Saluda at the cottage of 
her brother, the Rev. Albert Thomas, of Cheraw. She had the cot- 
tage during June, and Eleanor Relyea and Anne Mitchell, Miss 
Thomas's niece, recently graduated from Winthrop, were with her. 
Eleanor Relyea spent part of the time in preparing the college exami- 
nations which she will take in September when she goes to Smith. 
The latter part of the summer the Rev. Mr. Thomas's family will 
themselves be at the cottage with Miss Thomas. 

Miss Katie went from St. Mary's to visit some of her friends in 
Wilmington, where she was first with Mrs. Herbert Thompson (Mar- 
guerite LeCron, '08) and later with Mrs. Kenan. From there she 
went as usual to Fayetteville to the home of her sister, Mrs. William 
Hawley, coming to Raleigh for the Winters-Knox marriage. She is 
in Raleigh the latter part of the summer with her relatives and will 
be here for the marriage of her niece, Anne McKimmon (S. M. S., 
1908-11) and Mr. Ray in August. 

Mile. Rudnicka went direct from the School to Asheville and has 



214 The St. Mary's Muse 

decided to spend the summer there. She was first with Mrs. Mitchell 
and is now staying at St. Genevieve's. She is as deeply interested as 
ever in war relief, and is delighted to have the opportunity of giving 
some elementary lessons in French to some of the soldiers around 
Asheville, just as is being done in so many parts of the country. 

At the close of the Raleigh Summer School the last of July Mr. 
and Mrs. Owen and little Miss Owen went to Flat Rock for the re- 
mainder of the vacation, where Mr. Owen will have charge of the 
organ at St. John's in the Wilderness, as he did last year. Miss Dowd 
also will spend August at Flat Rock where several of her friends are 
summer residents. 

Miss Clara Fenner had June with her friends in Baltimore and 
the Eastern Shore, while Miss Lillian Fenner was with Miss Gerber 
in Raleigh. At the close of the Summer School Miss Lillian went to 
Baltimore. 

Miss Urquhart was in Raleigh for several weeks at the close of 
School and then went back to her home in Ashfield, Massachusetts, 
to see her brother before he was called to active duty in the army. 

Miss Roberts spent the first part of the vacation at Fayetteville 
and has later been with her sister in Winston-Salem. 

Miss Shields writes that she is ready for her work in the fall and 
is looking forward to it with pleasure. She has been visiting Miss 
Robins at her home in Gloucester County, Va., and is planning a 
Kindersymphonie at her home in Scotland Neck the last of the sum- 
mer. Miss Roberts and Miss Alexander are with her in August. 

Most of the other teachers are at their homes. 



The Class of 1917 



Judging from the desire for certificates it would seem that most 
of the 1917 graduates are planning to teach the coming year. Excep- 
tions are Eleanor Relyea, who will enter Smith College, and Annie 
Robinson, who will go into training at St. Luke's Hospital in New 



The St. Mary's Muse 215 

York City. Virginia C. Allen and Emma Badham attended the 
Summer School at Nashville — the former will teach at Hickory and 
the latter at Edenton. Frances Cheatham will teach in Henderson, 
Alice Latham in Hendersonville, Eva Peel in Robersonville. An- 
nouncements from the other girls are not yet at hand. Of course 
the chief interest of the class in the early summer centered in the 
marriage of Golda Jucld to Mr. Henry Walker of Elizabeth City, 
which took place shortly after her graduation. 

The Class of 1917 was deeply appreciative of the Commencement 
thought of "Jack" Watt (Miss Jacksonia Watt, of Griffin, Ga.) who 
telegraphed to Alice Latham on Commencement Day: 

The greatest disappointment of my life that I could not graduate with you. 
The next, that I cannot be there to see you. But my graduation from Hart- 
ridge, June 15th, detains me. My love and best wishes go with you and all 
the girls of the class of nineteen seventeen. 

After spending her Freshman year here and entering on her Sopho- 
more year, Miss Watt had a special opportunity to enter the well- 
known Hartridge School at Plainfield, 1ST. J., in preparation for col- 
lege work, and our congratulations go to her on her successful com- 
pletion of the course there. But her loyalty to St. Mary's has never 
flagged. 



St. Mary's in the Summer Schools 



St. Mary's has been well represented in the summer schools of the 
N. C. A. and E. College at Raleigh, of the University of North Caro- 
lina at Chapel Hill, and Peabody College for Teachers at Nashville, 
Tenn. 

Mr. Owen, Director of the Music Department at St. Mary's, was 
in charge of the Music Department of the Raleigh Summer School, 
and Miss Dowd taught Normal Music there. Mrs. C. L. Mann, who 
as Miss Yanita Cribbs had charge of the Elocution at St. Mary's, had 
that department at the Summer School; and Miss May Hill Davis 
(S. M. S., '89), now of the State School for the Blind, was the teacher 



216 The St. Mary's Muse 

of Basketry. Miss Elizabeth Telfair (S. M. S., 1910-15) was in- 
structor in Swimming. 

Miss Catharine Albertson (S. M. S., . . ) of Elizabeth City is 
the Secretary of the Summer School. Among the students in attend- 
ance have been Miss Ellen Bowen of Jackson and the Misses Ran- 
dolph Hill, Elizabeth Walker, Lillian Riddick, Katherine Alston, 
Marian Alston, Ellen Lay, Elizabeth Lay, Frances Park, Ruth Lee, 
Nell Hinsdale, and Florence Stone, of Raleigh. 

Mr. Owen made quite a feature of the Music Department, under 
the auspices of which a number of excellent programs were given. 
Miss Emily Rose Knox, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. A. W. Knox, gave 
a violin concert on June 22d, and on July 12th Miss Llora Hoffman, 
who made such a favorable impression at St. Mary's, appeared in 
concert. On Saturday, July 21st, Mr. Owen gave an organ recital 
in St. Mary's Chapel. On Tuesday, July 21th, the concluding week 
of the Summer School, Mr. Owen and Mrs. Mann united in a joint 
program given by their students. 

On July 4th much interest was taken in the Summer School's 
observance of the occasion, and a large group of St. Mary's girls 
appeared under the School banner. 

Of special interest in the Summer School was the lecture of Presi- 
dent Emilie W. McVea of Sweetbriar College, who spoke on "The 
American Woman." This was quite a St. Mary's occasion. Dr. 
McVea was introduced by Mrs. Bickett, wife of Governor Bickett, 
and devoted graduate of St. Mary's, who took occasion to remind 
Miss McVea of how much she had meant to St. Mary's and St. Mary's 
girls during the many years that she was student and teacher here. 
And Miss McVea, in return, again voiced her devotion to her old 
School. Among the half-dozen other ladies occupying seats on the 
platform were Mrs. Lay, President of the Woman's Club, and Miss 
Martha Haywood (S. M. S., '90), President of the Equal Suffrage 
League. Miss McVea's address was a strong one and added to her 
high reputation as a thinker and speaker. 

At Chapel Hill, Mr. Hagedorn, who has charge of the Violin 
teaching and Orchestra at St. Mary's, is, as heretofore, in charge of 
the Music Department. 



The St. Mary's Muse 217 

Miss Harriet E. Bowen (S. M. S., '96) of the Chapel Hill Schools 
is an instructor in the Model School at the University Summer 
School, and among the students have been Misses Julia W. Allen, 
Katharine Bourne, Annie Cameron, Margaret Bottum, Esther 
Springs, Anna May Freeman, Sophronia Cooper, and Janie Row- 
land. 

At Nashville have been Misses Frances Bottum, Emma Badham, 
Fannie Stallings, Virginia C. Allen, Frances Geitner, and Maud 
McCulloch. 



Mrs. Margaret Busbee Shipp, Author 



The following appreciation of Mrs. Margaret Busbee Shipp ap- 
peared in the literary section of the Raleigh Times of June 4th. It 
will be interesting to those who have not seen it as giving present 
facts about Mrs. Shipp, who since her St. Mary's days has always 
been such an object of interest and admiration to St. Mary's girls, 
her younger sisters : 

Mrs. Margaret Busbee Shipp considers with more pride just now the Ameri- 
can National Red Cross certificate which she has recently received for the 
successful completion of a First Aid course than she does the frequent appear- 
ance of her stories in the leading magazines of the country. 

"It was the proudest moment of my life, the climax of my career," she 
insisted, turning her chair away from her desk in the office of J. W. Bailey, 
Collector of Internal Revenue, where she is a real business woman in spite of 
the difficulty of associating typewriters, desks, and bare offices with Mrs. 
Shipp. 

But there came a light of pure joy into her eyes when asked about her first 
story which even the First Aid certificate had not brought there. 

"Do I remember the first story I had accepted? Well, I should think I do!" 
The story, entitled "A Homely Little History of Today," appeared in Ainslee's 
Magazine. It was Mrs. Shipp's first effort toward the business of making a 
living after the death of Lieut. William E. Shipp in the battle of San Juan 
in the Spanish-American War. 

"I had always loved to write stories for St. Mary's Muse and other minor 
publications, so I naturally turned to story-writing," Mrs. Shipp explained 
when asked how she started into the story-writing business. The acceptance 
of the first story sent out and a check for $25 brought visions of a rich future. 
Story-writing was just fun, and she could easily turn out such a story as the 
one accepted by Ainslee's Magazine once a week, she assured herself. 



218 The St. Mary's Muse 

"And it was a whole year before I had another story accepted," she said, 
a bit ruefully even yet as thoughts of the disappointments of that first year. 

Mrs. Shipp is made of the stuff that it takes to gain success as a magazine 
writer. Among the leading magazines which have accepted her stories, 
poems, and articles since that first year of disappointment are: The Ameri- 
can Magazine, Associated Sunday Magazine, Ainsle's, Collier's, Cosmopolitan, 
Munsey, Pearson's, Red Book, Smart Set, Smith's, Saturday Evening Post, 
Woman's Home Companion, and the Youth's Companion. Besides these she 
has contributed to twelve or fifteen other religious and minor publications. 
"The Twilight of Dubiety," by Mrs. Shipp, appeared in the May Woman's 
Home Companion; "Straight Facts About Todd" appeared in the June Com- 
panion; there is a short poem in the June Munsey, and a story is to appear in 
the August issue of Everybody's. 

Success has come largely through dealing directly with the editors of the 
magazines. Mrs. Shipp does not think much of a literary agent. Some time 
ago an agent returned a story which he had unsuccessfully tried to place 
with a dozen or more magazines, mentioning among the number The Gray 
Goose and The Blue Mule, magazines entirely unknown to Mrs. Shipp. Her 
first effort to sell the returned manuscript brought a check of $125. 

Among Mrs. Shipp's early efforts, and one which she especially enjoyed, 
was a collection of fragments of poems from the Brownings for a Browning 
Year Book. 

Mrs. Shipp's stories often serve as safety valves for the stored up experi- 
ences and impressions of everyday life. Saturated with knowledge of First 
Aid methods, Mrs. Shipp has been working off some of the fire of her enthusi- 
asm in a Red Cross story. "I just had to have some arterial bleeding some- 
where," she laughed. 

As an example of what a background of unused knowledge is often neces- 
sary before writing a story, Mrs. Shipp told of the weeks and weeks which 
she spent studying before introducing in a story a woman who was a leper. 
When the story was told it had such a clinical sound it was ruthlessly rewritten, 
only one little sentence remaining to express the research of weeks. "And 
ever since then there has been a horrible sore spot of leprosy in my brain," 
said Mrs. Shipp. 

A variety of interests have been of value to Mrs. Shipp in her work. Her 
stories show a marked diversity. Among the organizations with which she 
is identified are: The Woman's Club of Raleigh, the Country Club, Fort- 
nightly Review Club, North Carolina Conference for Social Service, State 
Forestry Association, National American Red Cross Society, Raleigh Equal 
Suffrage League. She is a member of the executive committee of the State 
Literary and Historical Association, is ex-President of St. Mary's Alumna? 
Association, is president of the Raleigh Chapter of the Alliance Frangaise, 
and is local chairman of the Permanent Blind War Relief Fund. 

Mrs. Shipp is the daughter of the late Fabius H. Busbee, of Raleigh, and 
the widow of Lieut. William E. Shipp, of the 10th Cavalry, who was killed 
in the battle of San Juan in the Spanish-American War. Her two sons, 
William E. and Fabius, true to their heritage, are in the service of the United 



The St. Maky's Muse 219 

States Army. William E. Shipp, First Lieutenant of the 12th Cavalry, is 
stationed at Columbus, New Mexico, and Fabius, who is Provisional Second 
Lieutenant of Cavalry, is stationed at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 



Death) of Mrs. Randolph 



St. Mary's girls of "Dr. Bratton's" day will be interested in the 
news of the death in June, at the home of Bishop Bratton, "Battle 
Hill," Jackson, Miss., of Mrs. Randolph. Mrs. Randolph was the 
mother of the first wife of Bishop Bratton, of Mississippi, and when 
he was Rector of St. Mary's School here she lived in his home and 
was known and esteemed by a wide circle of friends. 

The Jackson paper says: 

Mrs. Elizabeth Beard Randolph died at the home of Bishop Bratton at 
9:30 o'clock this morning. Mrs. Randolph had been sinking rapidly for 
several days, and her death was not unexpected. She is taken in her 94th 
year, and her passing away was but the gradual running out of her life's 
strength. This morning, surrounded by her devoted children and grand- 
children, she passed to her reward. 

Mrs. Randolph was the mother of Bishop Bratton's first wife, Lucy Ran- 
dolph Bratton, and has made her home with Bishop Bratton for many years. 
She came with him to Mississippi when he moved to Jackson to take up his 
work in this field. Her presence in this home has been a benediction, and 
she has received always the devoted care of those who loved her for her 
splendid womanhood and beautiful life. 

Her circle of intimates was necessarily small, as she has been confined for 
many years to her bed. But she has many friends who will unite with the 
family in sorrow for their loss. 



Notes of Interest to St. Mary's People 



At the May meeting of the Woman's Club of Raleigh Mrs. Lay 
assumed the presidency, to which she was elected in March. She 
has been for the past two years chairman of the Social Service De- 
partment. 

Miss Thomas, who in March had been reelected as president of the 
Raleigh Branch of the Southern Association of College Women, 
resigned the office in May on account of leaving the city. Miss Snook 



220 The St. Mast's Muse 

will be the vice-president of this club the coming year. Mrs. Cruik- 
shank, who was president of the club in 1914-16, was the delegate 
this year to the annual meeting in Durham ; while Miss Thomas, the 
president, represented the Branch at the annual meeting of the Asso- 
ciation held in Washington City in April. 

Numbers of St. Mary's girls attended the Confederate Reunion 
in Washington the first week in June. Miss Melba McCullers 
(S. M. S., '14,) was sponsor for the North Carolina Division. In 
presenting her portrait in its issue of May 30th the News and Ob- 
server says of Miss McCullers : 

Miss Melba McCullers, sponsor for the North Carolina Division, United 
Confederate Veterans, for the reunion at Washington, June 4th, is the charm- 
ing daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Herbert McCullers, of Clayton, and the only 
granddaughter of the late Col. Ashley Home, who gave to the State the 
beautiful monument in Capitol Square, in memory of the Women of the Con- 
federacy. 

When Gen. James I. Metts, Commander-in-Chief of the North Carolina 
Division, U. C. V., appointed Miss McCullers to the highest honor the division 
has to bestow upon a young woman, his choice met State-wide approval, due 
in part to her Confederate lineage. Her grandfather, Colonel Home, was one 
of six brothers to serve the Confederacy, three of whom not only fought, but 
bled and died for the cause. 

Her grandmother, a "belle of the sixties," did her "bit" throughout the 
long struggle by making soldiers' jackets for the "Boys in Gray." She was 
Cornelia Lee, the daughter of Charles Washington Lee, a member of America's 
two most famous families — the Washingtons and Lees. 

Her paternal grandfather, Mr. William Henry McCullers, though too old 
for active service, rendered "material aid" in various ways to the cause, thus 
making her on both sides a true daughter of the Confederacy. 



St. Mary's College Graduates 



Three of St. Mary's daughters completed their courses this year 
in the higher institutions — Nell Battle Lewis, '12, of Raleigh, and 
Susannah Steele Busbee, '13, of Raleigh, graduating from Smith 
College; and Agnes Hyde Barton, '15, of Hartford, Conn., taking 
her Bachelor's degree at Chapel Hill. 

Miss Lewis will go to New York in the fall to study and work in 
Commercial Art; Miss Busbee, who majored in Chemistry at Smith, 



The St. Mary's Muse 221 

has a position as chemist in Baltimore ; and Miss Barton will return 
to St. Mary's to teach, taking the place of Miss Julia W. Allen, '14, 
who, after graduating from Randolph-Macon a year ago, has spent a 
year of teaching at St. Mary's. 

That the ability and merit of Miss Lewis are recognized at Smith 
may be judged from the following clipping from the News and Ob- 
server: 

The people of Raleigh are always delighted at learning of honors won by 
any of its sons and daughters, and there is much of this because of the promi- 
nent position taken by one of its choicest young women, Miss Nell Battle 
Lewis, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Richard H. Lewis, of Raleigh, just graduated 
at Smith College at Northampton, Mass. 

Miss Lewis was highly honored at the commencement exercises of the 
college which have just taken place, and there is a full account of this printed 
in the Springfield (Mass.) Republican, which gives individual pictures of 
Miss Lewis as one of the two speakers on Ivy Day, and in the costume of the 
jester in "Twelfth Night," presented as the senior dramatics, Miss Lewis 
being the only one of the cast thus honored in that paper. 

Raleigh has a right to be proud of the position won by Miss Lewis and by 
the notices of her in the great Massachusetts paper, which gave first page 
prominence to the commencement exercises of Smith College, the largest of 
all women's colleges in the world. The Springfield Republican says that 
"nine hundred alumnse, upward of a thousand parents, brothers, sisters, and 
suitors saw such an Ivy Day as was never seen before." Miss Susannah 
Steele Busbee, of Raleigh, was a member of the committee having the exer- 
cises in charge. 

That a Southern girl — and particularly a Raleigh girl — among the com- 
paratively few attending Smith College, should be given such marked atten- 
tion is very pleasing. In its account of the Ivy Day exercises of June 18, 
reported in its issue of June 19, the Springfield Republican says concerning 
Miss Lewis: 

"War prompted the high words of youth in 1917's exercises in John M. 
Greene hall this morning. From Josephus Daniels' own town, Raleigh, N. C, 
came Miss Nell Battle Lewis to speak on 'Our Wise Provincialism.' She did 
it cleverly, brilliantly, even for a class-day orator. Yet beneath all the sur- 
face sparkle of humor and the pleasant course of anecdote ran the sober 
burden of her thought: That one loves one's country most and serves it best 
by loving North Carolina and New York and Tombstone, Ariz., like the family 
hearth." 

In its account of the senior dramatics taking place on June 14, the Spring- 
field Republican has this to say of Miss Lewis as the jester: 

"Nell Lewis, of Raleigh, N. C, as the clown, the wistful, comical 'corrupter 
of words,' did exceptionally fine work. In spite of the fact that her voice 
had practically no training, her singing of the songs was delightful, and 
never once was she out of character during the entire performance." 



222 The St. Mary's Muse 



The Endowed Scholarships 



As a result of the competitive examination held May 2d and 3d 
in the two Carolinas for the vacant Smedes Memorial (Alumnae) 
Scholarship, that scholarship was awarded for the coming year to 
Miss Bertie E. Seawell, of Carthage, 1ST. C. 

After the competitive examination held on July 2d and 3d, the 
vacant David R. Murchison Scholarship, the holder of which must 
be a resident of the Diocese of East Carolina, was awarded to Miss 
Lucy London Anderson, of Fayetteville, an honor graduate of the 
High School there, at the recent Commencement. 



Changes Among the Raleigh Clergy 



St. Mary's girls always come to know more or less well the clergy 
of Raleigh, who assist the Rector from time to time, and are always 
good friends of the School. It is a matter of interest to us therefore 
to note the news of them. 

Rev. Julian E. Ingle, a Trustee of St. Mary's, formerly of Hen- 
derson, but in recent years of Raleigh, retired this year from the 
post of Secretary of the Diocese, which he has filled for twenty-five 
years. He is succeeded by the Rev. Morrison Bethea, of Wilson. 

Rev. IsT. C. Hughes, formerly of Chocowinity, but in late years 
Archdeacon of the Raleigh Convocation, with his home in Raleigh, 
has resigned as Archdeacon to become Chaplain at the State Farm, 
near Halifax. His daughter, Elizabeth Hughes (1912), who has 
been teaching in the Raleigh Schools, will spend the winter with her 
family at the State Farm. The new Archdeacon is Rev. Alfred S. 
Lawrence, who comes from St. Matthew's Church, Hillsboro. 

Rev. Dr. I. McK. Pittenger, Rector of the Church of the Good 
Shepherd, resigned his work with the completion of the 25th anni- 
versary of his rectorship, and has been made Rector Emeritus. The 
new Rector is Rev. C. A. Ashby, formerly of Elizabeth City. Dr. 
and Mrs. Pittenger have built a home in Cameron Park and will 



The St. Mary's Muse 223 

live there, near the home of their son-on-law, Mr. Leigh Skinner. 
Mrs. Pittenger is the Honorary Vice-President of the St. Mary's 
Alumnae, and Mrs. Skinner (Louise Pittenger, 1900), after gradu- 
ation, was a teacher at St. Mary's. 

Rev. E. W. Groold is now in full charge as Principal of St. Augus- 
tine's School. He was married on June 9th to Miss Katherine Bird- 
sail, of Orange, "N, J. The Rev. A. B. Hunter, who has long been 
Principal of St. Augustine's, has not severed his connection with the 
School and he and Mrs. Hunter will continue to live there. They are 
spending the summer at their summer home in Vermont. Mrs. 
Hunter continues as Superintendent of St. Agnes' Hospital. 

Bishop and Mrs. Cheshire and Miss Sarah Cheshire are all of the 
Bishop's family now living at "Ravenscroft." Mr. and Mrs. J. B. 
Cheshire, Jr., have moved to their new home on Ambleside, in 
Cameron Park, and Mr. and Mrs. Godfrey Cheshire, with little Miss 
Alice, have gone to Southport, 1ST. C. Mr. Godfrey is a First Lieu- 
tenant in the Coast Artillery, at present stationed at Fort Caswell. 
Bishop Cheshire's other son, Mr. James Cheshire, is now in training 
at Port Oglethorpe. 

Rev. Francis M. Osborne, Special Representative of the Trustees 
of St. Mary's, in charge of raising the Endowment Fund, whose 
home had been in Charlotte before he undertook the St. Mary's work, 
has now moved to Raleigh with Mrs. Osborne and young Francis, 
and is living on East Jones Street. 



Brief Notes of trje Girls 



Martha Wright spent July with Frances Hillman in Nashville, 
Tenn., and Frances Hillman returned with her to Boardman for 
August. 

Annie Robinson and Nancy Woolford have been accepted for train- 
ing at St. Luke's Hospital, New York City, and will report in Sep- 
tember. They are spending the summer at their homes. 

Elizabeth Carrison, '15, and Josephine Wilson, '16, are attending 
the Columbia University Summer School this summer. Josephine 



224 The St. Mary's Muse 

Wilson is now a Senior at Goucher College, and Elizabeth Carrison 
is thinking of specializing in Physical Education. 

Sadie Vinson, '13, of Littleton, Anniebelle King, '13, of Louis- 
burg, and Helene JSTorthcott, ex-' 13, of Winton, spent a night in July 
at the School with Elizabeth Lay, on their way to a holiday month 
in Waynesville. 

Susan Smith attended the Blue Ridge Conference the last of June 
as representative of the Junior Auxiliary of the Diocese of ISTorth 
Carolina. 

Anne Wilson was operated on for appendicitis in June. 

Mary Mullins is spending the summer in Hendersonville at her 
summer home, and Allene Hughes is visiting her there in August. 



Alumnae Weddings 



Munt-W right. On Monday, May 14th, at Boardman, 1ST. C, Miss 
Helen Cherry Wright, '16, and Dr. Herbert Frederick Munt. At 
home, Boardman, N". C. 

Pratt-Russ. On Monday, June 4th, at Christ Church, Raleigh, 
Miss Betty Russ (S. M. S., 1910-11) and Mr. Jesse H. Pratt of 
Hartford, Conn. 

McCarthy-GuirJcin. On Tuesday, June 5th, in Raleigh, N. C, 
Miss Chloe Guirkin (S. M. S., 1914-15) and Mr. Joseph Karl 
McCarthy, of Raleigh. 

Windham-Rouse. On Wednesday, June 6th, in LaGrange, UST. C, 
Miss Eliza Rouse (S. M. S., 1914-15) and Mr. A. B. Windham, of 
Petersburg, Va. 

Bruton-Smith. On Thursday, June 7th, in St. Timothy's Church, 
Wilson, K C, Miss Evelyn Gladys Smith (S. M. S., 1913-14) and 
Mr. John Bruton, of Wilson. 

Kirksey-Horner. On Monday, June 11th, in St. Martin's Church, 
Charlotte, K C, Miss Kate Murchison Horner (S. M. S., 1903-04) 
and Mr. William A. Kirksey. At home, Charlotte, 1ST. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse 225 

Winters-Knox. On Monday, June 18th, at Raleigh, 1ST. C, Miss 
Elizabeth Washington Knox (S. M. S., 1904-05) and Dr. Rhett 
Youmans Winters. At home, Raleigh, 1ST. C. 

Walker-Judd. On Wednesday, June 20th, at Raleigh, Miss Golda 
Foy Judd, '17, and Mr. Henry Grady Walker, of Poplar Branch, 
K C. 

Leach-Boy den. On Wednesday, June 20th, in St. John's Church, 
Nashville, Tenn., Miss Jennie Belle Boyden (S. M. S., 1912-13) 
and Mr. Robert Swepson Leach. At home, Boston, Mass. 

Dees-Gulley. On Wednesday, June 27th, in Rocky Mount, 1ST. C, 
Miss Metta Graham Gulley (S. M. S., 1901-02) and Mr. Percy 
Monroe Dees. 

Bunn-Lamb. On Wednesday, June 27th, in the Church of the 
Holy Innocents, Henderson, 1ST. C, Miss Mary Hilliard Lamb 
(S. M. S., 1911-12) and Mr. Arthur Alexander Bunn, of Henderson. 

MacMillan-Hartridge. On Thursday, June 28th, in the Church 
of the Good Shepherd, Jacksonville, Fla., Miss Helen Sandwich 
Hartridge (S. M. S., 1911-13) and Mr. Thomas Hasley MacMil- 
lan, Jr. 

Kehaya-Whitdner. On Saturday, June 30th, in St. Paul's Church, 
Winston-Salem, N". C, Miss Grace Buxton Whitaker (S. M. S., 
1903-06) and Mr. Ery Euripides Kehaya, of New York City. 

Hanes-Borden. On Tuesday, July 3d, in Goldsboro, 1ST. C, Miss 
Mildred Borden (S. M. S., 1907-09 ) and Mr. Robert Marche Hanes. 
At home, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Leonard-Ivey. On Tuesday, July 17th, in Raleigh, N. C, Miss 
Bessie Ivey (S. M. S., 1904-07) and Mr. George Leonard, of Green- 
ville, 2sr. c. 

Swindell-Hales. On Tuesday, July 24th, in Trinity Church, Wash- 
ington City, Miss Lorna Hales (S. M. S., 1908-09) and Dr. Charles 
LeRoy Swindell, First Lieutenant in the Medical Reserve Corps, 
IT. S. A. 

Wilder-Fuller. On Wednesday, July 25th, at Fort Leavenworth, 
Kansas, Miss Georgia Fuller (S. M. S., 1911-12) and Lieut. Cyrus 
Jenness Wilder, Thirteenth U. S. Cavalry. 



226 The St. Mary's Muse 

Boylan-Huglies. On Wednesday, July 25th, at Norfolk, Va., Miss 
Mary Winder Hughes (S. M. S., 1906-08), of New Bern, K C, and 
Mr. William Montfort Boylan, of Baleigh, ~N. C. 

Horton-Stedman. On Thursday, August 9th, in Christ Church, 
Kaleigh, K C, Miss Margaret Gray Stedman (S. M. S., '04) and 
Mr. Archibald Horton, of Baleigh. 



The St. Mary's Muse 

Subscription Price One Dollar 

Single Copies --------- Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's 
School, Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the 
editorial management of the Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, 1916-17. 

Virginia Caroline Allen, '17 Editor-in-Chief 

Elmyra Jenkins, '17 Exchange Editor 

Alice Cohn Latham, '17 ") „ . „ 

I Senior Reporters 

Annie Huske Robinson, '17 f 

ESTELLE STKOZIER RAVENEL, '18 ) „ 

( Junior Reporters 

Katharine Parker Drane, '18 C 

Emma Hudgins Badham, '17 Business Manager 

Frances Howe Cheatham, '17 , 

]. Assistant Business Managers 

Sara Louise Wood, '18 



EDITORIAL 



This Summer Number of The Muse completes the twenty-first 
volume. The first number of the twenty-second volume, the "Opening 
Number," will be published September 10th, with the new editors in 
charge. 

Miss Allene Hughes, '18, of Henderson, will be Editor-in-Chief the 
coming session, and Miss Agnes Pratt, '18, of Madison, will be the 
Business Manager. 

The hold-over members of The Muse Club are Katharine Drane, 
'18, Nina Burke, '19, Bessie Folk, '18, Ruth Gebert, '18, Allene 
Hughes, '18, Helen Laughinghouse, '18, Novella Moye, '18, Agnes 
Pratt, '18, Estelle Kavenel, '18 ; the new members are Bertha Albert- 



228 The St. Mary's Muse 

son, '19, Helen Battle, '20, Elizabeth Bowne, '20, Mildred Collins, 
'19, Katharine Darden ) '20, Mildred Kirtland, '19, Ellen Lay, '20, 
Helen Mason, '18, Catherine Mott, '21, Mary Mullins, '19, Mary 
Neal, '21, Ella Pender, '20, Mary Polk, '20, Susan Smith, '20, Eliza- 
beth Waddell, '20, and Mary C. "Wilson, '20. 






Read! Mark! Act! 



(The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
iders of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
inciple to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
3m to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
is their loss, not ours. 



DON'T FORGET 

TAYLOR'S 

206-10 MASONIC TEMPLE 



Success in the Campaign for the Raising of the $250,000 
Fund to pay off the debt and provide additional new build- 
ings, and the beginning of an Endowment Fund is of the 
utmost importance to St. Mary's. 

Think of it, talk of it, and help in every way you can. 







B. W. JONES 


"You get them when promised" 


The 
Best in 
Groceries 


Hortroh s Studio 

Masonic Temple 


I ones 667-668 528 Hillsboro Street 


"Workers in Artistic Photography" 



Advertisements 




HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
THE WAKE DBUG STOBE 

Phones 228 


HICKS' UPTOWN DBUG STOBE 

Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 


s 
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Call OLIYE'S BAGGAGE TBANSFE1 

Phone 529 




PESCUD'S BOOK STOBE 

12 W. Hargett St. 


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ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 




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CHOICE CUT FLOWEBS 


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All Kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 


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Subscriptions for the monthly Muse are very acceptable 
at all times. One dollar will bring the ten copies of the 
Muse published next after its receipt. 


IK 

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S. Wilmington St. 


MARRIAGE INVITATIONS AND 
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CORRECTLY and PROMPTLY ENGRAVED 

Send for samples and prices 

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Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 




California Fruit Store, 111 Fayetteville St., Raleigh 

Fancy fruits and pure ice cream. Best equipped and most 
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Meats of All Kinds 





Advertisements 



tationery, College Linen, Pennants, 
Cameras and Supplies 
TVaterman's Ideal Fountain Pens 

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THE FOOTERY SHOP 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THE ALUMNAE ARE REMINDED 
that a complete Alumnce Register, which should include 
information about all past students of St. Mary's, is 
now in course of preparation for publication. 

Information for this Register is solicited. 



TLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

ome Company Home Capital 

Safe, Secure, and Successful 

AS. E. JOHNSON, President 

A. A. THOMPSON, Treasurer 
R. S. BUSBEE. Secretary 

Insure Against Loss by Fire 

t Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

Charles E Johnson, Jr., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
SHOES AND HOSIERY 



Hafapette 



A Cafe which invites the patronage of 
ladies. The girls of St. Mary's •will enjoy 
the beauty and convenience of our modern, 
well-appointed dining- place. 

Fayetteville Street, next to Almo. 



Thomas H. Briggs & Sons 

Raleigh, N. C. 

THE BIG HARDWARE MEN 

GOLF, TENNIS, AND SPORTING GOODS 

MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
104 EAST HARGETT ST. Bell Phone 71 



Advertisements 



THE YARBOROUGH 



Raleigh's Leading and Largest Hotel 



Dinners and Banquets a Specialty 



B. H. Griffin Hotel Co., Proprietor! 



Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Co. 

COLLEGE 
JEWELRY 

128 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

WATSON PICTURE AND ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades. 

SHOES! WHOSE? 
BERNARD L. CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street 

GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 



YOUNG & HUGHES 



Plumbers 

Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating 



S. Wilmington Stree 



C. D. ARTHUR City Marke 

FISH AND OYSTERS 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Colleg-e Pennants, Pillows, Pictures, 
Frames, Novelties 



EOYSTER'S CANDY A SPECIALTY 

Made Fresh Every Day 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars 
to San Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tick- 
ets on sale to principal Western points. Convenient local, as well 
as through trains. Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining 
Car Service on all through trains. Ask representatives of Southern 
Railway about special rates account Christmas holidays; also 
about various other special occasions. If you are contemplating a 
trip to any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. They will 
gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to the 
cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you 



H. F. CARY, General Pass. Agent, 
Washington, D. C. 



J. 0. JONES, Traveling Pass. Agent, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements 



St. Mary's Girls Always Welcome at 

Hudson-Belk Company 

\Full line of Ready-to-wear, Hosiery, Gloves, Furnishings, Dry 
Goods, Shoes, Toilet Goods, Ribbons and Laces 



ESTABLISHED 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

M. ROSENTHAL & COMPANY 

GROCERS 

Wilmington and Hargett Streets 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 
AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Cor. Fayetteville and Hargett Sts. 



THOMAS A PARTIN COMPANY 

Raleigh, N. 0. 

Specialty of Ladies' Ready-to-Wear Gar- 
ments and Gossard's Lace Front Corsets 



THE SCHOOL AUTHORITIES 

are at all times pleased to send full information 
about St. Mary's on request without charge. 
We should like every one interested to have at 
least copies of 

The Illustrated Catalogue, 

The Books of Views, 

The Song Book. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

the 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



BOYLAN-PEARGE 

COMPANY 

The Greatest Store 
in the City for the 

SCHOOL GIRLS 



Location Central for the Carolmas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Marts School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

75th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBEE 20, 1917. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 24, 1918. 



1. THE COLLEGE 

2. THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
St. Mary's V s TEE ART DEPARTMENT 

offers 
instruction { k- THE ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT 

in these J Sm TEE E0MB ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 

Departments i 

6. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL 

7. THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



In 1916-17 were enrolled 275 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. 
Thirty-six Pianos. Neio Gymnasium, Dining Hall and 
Dormitories. 
Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without 
slight to the Scholastic training. 
For catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, D. C, L., 

Rector. 

(DWARDS & SROUSHTON PRINTING CO.. RALIIGH. N. C.